Principles of Elocution

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Oliver & Boyd, 1857 - 412 стор.
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Зміст

Love of Country
65
A Portion of Grays Bard
71
MISCELLANEOUS LESSONS
79
Patience recommended
86
Westminster Abbey
92
Remarks on the Swiftness of Time
98
Dryden and Pope compared
105
The Koran
112
Remarks on some of the best Poets both Ancient and Modern
119
Siege and Conquest of Jerusalem by the Crusaders
125
Field Sports and Agriculture of the Middle Ages
132
The World made with a bountiful Design
140
The Works of Creation
142
Luxury and Avarice
144
On Slavery
146
On Grieving for the Dead
148
On Remorse
149
On Human Grandeur
151
The Effect of Association of Ideas on the Belief of Mankind
152
The Encounter of Brave and the Panther
155
St Paul at Athens
159
Dramatic Poets
161
Security
163
On the Sublime in Writing
164
HISTORICAL AND BIOGRAPHICAL EXTRACTS 1 Our natural Fondness for History and its true Use
168
Character of Francis the First and of Charles the Fifth
169
Character of William the Third
170
Character of Mr Pitt
173
Character of Lord Clive
174
Character of Addison
176
Character of James Watt
177
Character of Hannibal
179
Character of Mary Queen of Scots
180
PATHETIC EXTRACTS 1 St Peters Chapel in the Tower
182
The Funeral of the Fishermans Son from the Antiquary
183
Maria Part I
186
Maria Part II
187
SPECIMENS OF PULPIT ELOQUENCE 1 The Change produced by Death
190
Charity
191
Religious Knowledge a Source of Consolation
193
Spiritual Blindness
194
The Works and Attributes of the Almighty
197
The Injustice of War
198
Prayer
200
The State of Man before the Fall
201
The departed Spirits of the Just are Spectators of our Conduct on Earth
203
Religious Knowledge
204
The End of the Year
206
The Promises of Religion to the Young
208
Autumn
209
SPECIMENS OF MODERN ELOQUENCE 1 The British Monarchy
212
Extract from Mr Burkes Speech on Conciliation with America
213
Lord Lytteltons Speech on the Repeal of the Act called the Jew Bill A D 1753
216
Arbitrary Power not given to Man
218
Extract from Henry Broughams Speech at the Liverpool Election 1812
219
Old Age and Death
276
Prologue to Cato 1713
280
Character of Villiers Duke of Buckingham
281
Character of Shaftesbury
282
The Art of Criticism
283
Harmony of Expression
284
On Man
285
Universal Order
287
Conclusion of the Dunciad
288
The Treasures of the Deep
289
Address to the Nightingale
290
From the Spirits Epilogue in Comus
292
Freedom
293
The Village Preacher
294
The beautiful but still and melancholy Aspect of the once busy and glorious Shores of Greece
296
From the Traveller
297
To the Memory of my beloved Master William Shakspeare and what he hath left us
298
A Ship Sinking
299
Solitude
300
Happiness the Reward of Virtue
301
Ode on the Fate of Tyranny
302
Grongar Hill
304
Worth makes the Man
308
The Siege of Corinth
310
Christian and his Comrades at Otaheite
311
Sonnet The World is too much with us
313
Hymn to Adversity
314
BLANK VERSE 1 Retirement
315
From Miltons Comus 316
316
On Slavery
317
Despondency rebuked by Fame
318
Address to Evening
319
Perseverance
320
Forest Scenery 321
321
Cardinal Wolseys Speech to Cromwell
322
11 Human Life
323
Flattery unworthy of a Poet
324
Description of Adam and Eve
325
Autumn Evening Scene
327
On Death
328
Apostrophe to Night
329
Hymn on the Seasons
330
Lochiels Warning
333
Hotspur and Sir Richard Vernon from the First Part of Henry the Fourth
335
From the Play of As you Like
336
Master Matthew and Bobadil
342
The Quarrel of Brutus and Cassius
348
Hesperus and Floribel from the Brides Tragedy
355
Zangas Reasons for hating Alonzo
361
Othellos Apology
367
Eves Address to Adam after dreaming that she had tasted of
373
Speech of Rolla
380
Catos Soliloquy on the Immortality of the Soul
386
Contest between the Nose and Eyes
392
Justice and the Oyster
399

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Сторінка 383 - With a bare bodkin ? who would fardels bear, To grunt and sweat under a weary life, But that the dread of something after death, The undiscover'd country from whose bourn No traveller returns, puzzles the will And makes us rather bear those ills we have Than fly to others that we know not of ? Thus conscience does make cowards of us all...
Сторінка 72 - But yesterday, the word of Caesar might Have stood against the world ; now lies he there, And none so poor to do him reverence. 0 masters ! if I were disposed to stir Your hearts and minds to mutiny and rage, 1 should do Brutus wrong, and Cassius wrong, Who, you all know, are honorable men. I will not do them wrong ; I rather choose To wrong the dead, to wrong myself, and you, Than I will wrong such honorable men.
Сторінка 381 - Wilt thou upon the high and giddy mast Seal up the ship-boy's eyes, and rock his brains In cradle of the rude imperious surge ; And in the visitation of the winds, Who take the ruffian billows by the top, Curling their monstrous heads, and hanging them With deafning clamours in the slippery clouds, That, with the hurly, death itself awakes ? Canst thou, O partial sleep!
Сторінка 365 - tis true, this god did shake ; His coward lips did from their colour fly, And that same eye whose bend doth awe the world Did lose his lustre : I did hear him groan : Ay, and that tongue of his that bade the Romans Mark him and write his speeches in their books, Alas, it cried, 'Give me some drink, Titinius,
Сторінка 64 - O, young Lochinvar is come out of the west, Through all the wide Border his steed was the best ; And save his good broad-sword he weapon had none, He rode all unarmed, and he rode all alone. So faithful in love, and so dauntless in war, There never was knight like the young Lochinvar.
Сторінка 380 - ... twere, the mirror up to nature ; to show virtue her own feature, scorn her own image, and the very age and body of the time his form and pressure.
Сторінка 314 - Fame is the spur that the clear spirit doth raise (That last infirmity of noble mind) To scorn delights, and live laborious days ; But the fair guerdon when we hope to find, And think to burst out into sudden blaze, Comes the blind Fury with the abhorred shears And slits the thin-spun life.
Сторінка 50 - O, you hard hearts, you cruel men of Rome, knew you not Pompey? Many a time and oft have you climbed up to walls and battlements, to towers and windows, yea, to chimney-tops, your infants in your arms, and there have sat the livelong day, with patient expectation, to see great Pompey pass the streets of Rome...
Сторінка 363 - Most potent, grave, and reverend signiors, My very noble and approved good masters, That I have ta'en away this old man's daughter, It is most true ; true, I have married her : The very head and front of my offending Hath this extent, no more. Rude am I in my speech, And little bless'd with the soft phrase of peace ; For since these arms of mine had seven years...
Сторінка 381 - O gentle sleep, Nature's soft nurse, how have I frighted thee, That thou no more wilt weigh my eyelids down, And steep my senses in forgetfulness...

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