The British constitution: its history, structure, and working

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Сторінка 254 - That neither house of parliament had any power, by any vote or declaration, to create to themselves any new privilege, that was not warranted by the known laws and customs of parliament.
Сторінка 406 - Congress, that is in the two Houses, not as here, in the two together with the chief magistrate. We are therefore first of all to consider the constitution of that governing body, which consists of the House of Representatives and the Senate. The House of Representatives is chosen every two years by each of the States in the Union electing Deputies, in the proportion of one for every 30,000 inhabitants.* Their numbers are...
Сторінка 408 - Each state appoints, in whatever manner its own legislature may direct, a number of electors equal to the whole number of those whom it sends to both the Senate and the House of Representatives, no person holding any office in or under the Government being eligible as 'an elector. The electors then meet and vote by ballot for two persons, one as President, and one as Vice-President; one of whom at least must not be an inhabitant of the State. A list of all the persons voted for, with the number of...
Сторінка 62 - I ever heard such a thing even whispered; and I am as certain as I am of my own existence, that, during the whole of that period, not one act of a corrupt nature had ever been done by any one member of either House.
Сторінка 255 - ... house, have assumed to themselves alone a legislative authority, by pretending to attribute the force of a law to their declaration ; have claimed a jurisdiction not warranted by the constitution, and have assumed a new privilege to which they can...
Сторінка 219 - In the time of James I., as we have seen (Chap, xvi.), the Commons ordered a person who was charged only with having spoken disrespectfully of the Palatine, then an object of popular favour, to be led ignominiously in procession on horseback, with his head towards the tail of the beast, to be whipped from London to Westminster, to pay a fine of £5,000, and to be imprisoned for life; and all but the whipping was executed upon this unfortunate gentleman. In Charles I.'s time they habitually voted...
Сторінка 228 - May, carried to the Lords on the 7th, and agreed to by them on the 8th ; so that in three days the whole Constitution was changed, and the King's power became little more than nominal. The Bishops were then excluded from Parliament; and the King's assent to this was his last concession. What followed was done by main force, and on the eve of taking arms, or in the midst of that din which proverbially puts all law to silence. The immediate causes of the rebellion were, first, the religious zeal, or...
Сторінка 1 - There are three great divisions under which governments, where they are of the simple and unmixed form, may be classed, according to the hands in which the supreme power is lodged. It may be vested in a single person, or it may be vested in a particular class different from the bulk of the community, or it may be vested in the community at large. In the first case, the government is called a Monarchy ; in the second, an Aristocracy ; in the third, a Democracy.
Сторінка 401 - Bohemia as a member and subject of the Germanic empire, while the Bohemian was the Emperor's subject as King of Bohemia, So before 1801 a Hanoverian was the King of England's subject as Elector of Hanover, and an Irishman was his subject as King of Ireland ; nor did the existence of States in Hanover and of a Parliament in Ireland prevent the Sovereign from exercising his authority as ruler, greater or less according to the constitution of the two countries, in Hanover and in Ireland; but Hanover...
Сторінка 229 - Stuarts, treats this step as an indiscretion beyond " the fondest wish of his enemies;" as a course entered on " without concert, deliberation, or reflection ;" as an act " the prudence of which nobody pretended to justify," (Chap. Iv.) Lord Clarendon confesses that this unwarrantable and infatuated act alienated the generality of those who were beginning to judge more favourably of Charles, probably alarmed by the growing violence of the Parliamentary proceedings. Dr. Lingard...

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