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I suppose that all, or nearly all, of your 0.M. readers have heard of the 0.M. Scholarships, but I am sure that the words to most of them must hitherto have been vox et præterea nihil. The School List published at Christmas always contains a list of Subscribers' names, with a brief account of the foundation and application of these Scholarships, from which the following facts may be gathered.

On the 29th of January, 1861, there was a meeting of O.M's in London brought together presumably by the spirit of that period, when the School was already full of vigorous and manly life and energy, and of that promise for the future which has since been so largely realised, but still contending with difficulties, of which insufficient endowment was not the least. The O.M's present at this meeting resolved, as a means of emphatically expressing their abiding interest in the School, to open a Fund, to be known as the “O.M. Scholarship Fund," to be maintained by subscriptions, usually of 10s. 6d. per annum, and donations, and to be employed in founding a Scholarship or Scholarships to be held by present Marlburians by the gift of their brothers of the past.

Since then there has always been in the School an 0.M. Scholarship or Exhibition thus endowed: at present here are three Exhibitions, one of £50 per annum, tenable for three years given triennially for Classical subjects, and two, each of £25 per aunum, for Modern School subjects, one of which is vacant annually. But the Fund is inadequately supported. A glance at the list of subscribers' names will show that many of the early contributors have remained firm in their support, and that the older generations of O.M's still welcome this opportunity of showing by tangible proof that the interest of the School is always dear to them.

But where are the younger 0.M's, who, after all, might support this Fund most appropriately and gracefully for a year or two after leaving School ?

Sir, I know that their devotion to the School is even greater than that of their predecessors, and I feel sure that the lukewarm spirit in which this Fund has lately been supported is due not to indifference but to want of information or recollection. Yet more than 1000 circulars were sent out in 1882, and again in 1883 by the present Secretary of the Fund, 8. T. Fisher, Esq., 4, Park Prospect, Little Queen Street, Westminster, by whom contributions are gladly received at

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services are more or less full; but that reason does not hold in regard to the morning service, which as far as I can see could pass off just as well in classrooms as anywhere else. But why on Sunday mornings should we have to traverse the Court through any amount of rain ? Why at that time above all others should we have the exclusive privilege of getting wet ? I may also mention that it is more difficult to avoid getting wet in going to chapel than at most other occasions, For umbrellas are practically useless, if you have any regard for them; in the confusion of the ante-chamber they often lose their presence of mind and have a curious tendency to walk away with other people. Apologising for taking up so much of your valuable space, I am, yours, etc.,

ANTI-C.

To the Editor of the Marlburian. SIR,-Now that the studies at the bottom of B House appear to be going the way of all flesh, could not the space, where they used to be, be converted into a room for the especial purpose of keeping and drying flannels ? There is not very much room to spare in any of the lavatories for this purpose ; and a room of the kind has long been a grevious want. May I be allowed to hope that this opportunity will not be missed.

Yours., etc.,

N.T.

To the Editor of the Marlburian. 81R, -Without wishing to add needlessly to the heavy labours of Mr. Preston in regard to the new Museum, I should like to draw the attention of your readers to the existance of a want. We all feel immense gratitude to the energy which has provided the School such useful recreation ; but would notthat recreation be rendered still more useful by the publication of a short catalogue descriptive of the contents of the Museum ? Mr. Preston it is true delivered a lecture this term before some members of the Natural History Society to explain how the Museum could be most profitably used; but only a small number of the School were present ; and the majority of those who walk round the Museum on Sunday mornings have, I fear, a very scanty idea as to the nature of the objects that they see in the various glass cases before them; they remark that some objects are beautiful and that others are not, but beyond this they do not go. A catalogue of the character which I suggest would do something to dispel this ignorance, would excite curiosity, and finally, I should think, if I may appeal to baser and more mercenary motives, would pay.

I am, Sir, yours, etc.,

B. & B.

OLD MARLBURIAN SCHOLARSHIPS.

To the Editor of the Marlburian. DEÁR SIR,—It may seem somewhat out of place to address to you an appeal which is intended to apply to Old Marlburians solely, but your paper has become a recognised and valuable medium of communication between the present and the past.

8.

86

To the Editor of the Marlburian. GENTLEMEN,- In acknowledging the receipt of the sum collected for his testimonial (£16 9s.) Serjeant Purdey has asked me to make known to all subscribers his gratitude for their kindness.

May I just briefly, once more appeal to the school to support the Rifle Corps a little more heartily? I feel that the appeal is not made to ears entirely deaf, for last term there was a decided improvement both in the number and size of recruits. I hope I am right in thinking that this is no delusive sign of returning vigour. This term it is especially important for the credit of the corps, and therein of the school, to get fellows who possess thews and sinews. These qualities as a rule imply perve; and nerve is what we want in shooting at Wimbledon. There must be a fair number of fellows, who for some reason or other cannot hope to distinguish them. selves in games, but who might without a very great amount of trouble, win fame with the rifle. It is not a very hard thing to get into the VIII. Let me cite an instance of what perseverance and enthusiasm did last year. I have been told on the best authority that of the VIII. sent up to Wimbledon by a Public school, considerably junior to Marlborough, barely one member had handled a rifle before the preceding Christmas ; and yet they came very close to victory. I have ran on beyond my intention. With many apologies Yours faithfully,

G. W. RUNDALL,

To the Editor of the Marlburian. DEAR SIR,– The subject upon which I am writing is i one that deserves the attention of Marlburians generally 2. and has most thoroughly the interests of Marlborough at heart.

It is the Marlborough Nomad Football Club. This club for some reason or other, rightly or wrongly, seems to be 1 unpopular and in disfavour with the authorities at Marlborough,

and it is my object in writing this letter to point out a : few simple statements of fact which are worthy of the

attention of those interested in the best welfare of the

club it is necessary to state its present position and upon what basis that position rests.

Our club in the past has included the best athletes that the school has produced, and has always united amongst its members representatives from either university.

But then as the mint cannot go on producing sovereigns unless the raw material, gold, is supplied, equally the Nomads cannot continue in their present proficiency if Marlborough does not supply its contingent of new members.

It is fair to ask, why it is that our recruits have been scarce ?

Is it because our club does not do credit to the school?

Is it that our society is avoided by other schools, or by the crack football clubs of England ?

Or is it merely that Marlborough has an idle prejudice against us?

My natural modesty prevents my answering these questions; but it is fair and right that a few statements of fact should be brought to the notice of all those who watch the interests of this school.

To be brief: the Nomads have played with all the leading Metropolitan Clubs; they have met the Military Academies at Woolwich and Sandhurst; they have defeated the sailors and lowered the colours of the soldiers ; they have carried the name of Marlborough victoriously into the great trading districts of the north, playing Manchester, Huddersfield, and other big towns; at all these places and at several Schools they have been most warmly received at first, and welcomed again.

I venture to think that these matches, to which reference has been made, are likely to increase rather than lessen the good opinion which the public hold of Marlborough.

Are these invitations which we receive, these matches which we play, suggestive of the rowdyness and bad conduct with which our members are charged ?

I venture to think not, and without any hesitation I assert that no one has the better interests of Marlborough at heart, nobody is more anxious to further the interests of the School than the club to which I belong.

That club cannot continue to exist unless Marlborough supplies it with new members; and I certainly think that present Marlburians should consider the welfare of a club that does credit and honor to the school.

It may be thought that I am writing merely in the cause of the Nomads; this is not so, as through an accident it is never likely that I shall play football again, and it is under these circumstances that I have ventured to ask you to publish this letter, which is written, as I most sincerely believe, in the best interest of all those concerned in the scbool of which I am so humble a member.

And lastly let me add that the club was never more popular or better conducted than at present, and all Marlborough boys joining our ranks can be assured a hearty welcome and a thoroughly enjoyable game of football.

Yours sincerely,

ROBERT M. YETTS.

College.

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It has been stated, perhaps with some degree of truth, that the conduct of the Nomads was not as orthodox as the $ Masters might bave wished.

Mr. Editor!

This surely was in the past :- the chapter is finished, a new volume is begun, and with some degree of confidence I ask the readers of your excellent publication if there was anything objectionable or discreditable in the conduct of the team who recently visited you.

The answer I freely give in anticipation, and it is emphatic. No!

Then arises the question. How is it that reports and rumours decidedly detrimental to the interests and work of our club are continually reaching us from Marlborough? We think that certain persons, remembering the past, continually place it in prominence, in a manner calculated to crush the future. In order properly to consider the position of this

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£208 13 4

To the Editor of the Marlburian. SIR,-May I draw attention, through the assistance of your columns, to a slight grievance, the rectification of which would be a great convenience ? The Blue Book, which contains the various subjects for the prizes which competed for at the beginning of the term, does not usually arrive until a week, at least, of the holidays is past. In consequence there is never any great superfluity of time for working at the prizes, and it is not pleasant to waste any of the time that does remain. Moreover, I usually find that my bookseller makes some muddle or other in the ordering of the books. I should like to suggest that for the future the names of the publishers should be added; it would not, I should think, be a great trouble, and if it had been done last holidays it would have spared me a good deal of unnecessary bother.

I am, yours, etc.,

A.

EXPENDITURE.

...

...

...

March 29th.-Curate's Stipend...

-Cemetery Subscriptions June 29th.-Curate's Stipend Sept. 18th.-do do Dec. 14th.-do do

£ 8. d 37 10 0

10 0 37 10 0 37 10 0 37 10 0 15 15 4 4 4 4 0 4 15 15 0 14 1 41

Natural History Society.

A private meeting was held on Thursday, Jan. 24th. R. G. Durrant, Esq., and E. K. Chambers have joined the Committee, in place of G. F. Rodwell, Esq., and G. T. K. Maurice. Besides other smaller donations the Museum has been enriched by 52 very beautiful glass models, from Germany, of Sea Anemones, cuttle fish, &c., presented by Miss Preston. The last sheet of the large map of the Downs has been in the hands of the publisher for the last month. In the forthcoming report will be printed a handbook to the Museum, prepared by the Rev. T. A. Preston. On Feb. 14th, J. A. Boardillon, Esq., O.M., will read a paper on " Bengal as it is.” On March 6th, Dr. Rae, F.R.S., who has distinguished himself so greatly in the cause of Arctic explorations, will give some account of his five years' experience in the northern regions. For March 20th, W. Fergus, Esq., M.D. of Glasgow, has promised a paper on “the Eye."

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MARLBOROUGH COLLEGE MISSION FUND, AND OFFERTORY ACCOUNTS, 1883.

RECEIPTS. 1883.

£ 8. d. Jan. 1st.–Balance in hand

8 7 37 26th,--Offertory

23 10 0 Feb. 27th.—Walter C. Stunt, Esq.(subscription) 1 1 0 March 7th.- Offertory...

16 6 April 2nd.-Offertory

21 5 0 April 6th.-Box in Cloisters (Lent Term) 4 19 41 May 7th.-Offertory

22 0 29th.- Editors of Marlburians

6 10 0 June 19th.-Offertory. July 23rd.-Offertory

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...

Savernake Hospital
»-Preshute Parish
»-St. Peter's do
»-St. Mary's do
„-Society for Propagation of Gospel
Balance

£208 13 41

M. H. Gould, Secretary and Treasurer.

SCHOOL HONOURS.

Hubert Brinton, Exhibitioner of New College, Oxford, 1st Class in Classical Moderations.

Henry Raywood Firth, Scholar of Worcester College, Oxford, 1st Class in Classical Moderations.

William Hastings Sharp, 1st Open Classical Scholarship at Trinity College, Oxford.

Edward Alexander Molony, Open Scholarship at Emmanuel College, Cambridge. *Walter H. Rotheram,

Open Nomina. Francis W. D. Quinton.

tions to Godfrey Stuart Roupell.

Woolwich. * Passed direct from the School.

SCHOOL PRIZES.

Vth Form Poetry Prize-H. M. Giveen.

Hon. Mem.-E. F. Benson.

NOTICE TO CONTRIBUTORS.

Contributions should be written on one side of the paper only, and should be accompanied by the name the writer, not necessarily for publication, but as guarantee of good faith.

NOTICE TO SUBSCRIBERS.

24 7 0

The subscription to the Marlburian is 68. per year or 2s. 2d. per term. P.O.O.'s should be made payall to W. H. Sharp, The College, Marlborough.

!..

... 17 5 0

Printed by Chas. PERKINS, at his General Printing Office

Waterloo House, Marlborough.

LYDOS

WSOANE

PRICE 3d.

average, we failed to secure a single victory. We are inclined to attribute our failure to three several causes, one beyond our control and two preventible. Firstly, an unusual number of candidates for the XV, including both the half-backs, were temporarily disabled early in the season. The full importance of such a disaster can be appreciated only by those who have had to create a team. Secondly, there was no really good back player fit to represent the School. Bull was finally driven into playing back, not because it was his place, but faute de mieux. It was not a mere accident that there was no good “back” in the School last year. In ordinary games it is such a singularly uneventful place to occupy, as things are now, that the better players decline to play there, and the race of “ backs” is becoming extinct. It will be a difficult task of next year's Captain to revive it. Thirdly, and here we believe is the real secret, we

behind the times, The clubs we compete against have adopted a looser, faster game forward, and until we

ALII

THE MARLBYRIAN

VOL. XIX.-No. 303.

FEBRUARY 1317, 1884.

FOOTBALL SEASON, 1883.

To have to record that the School last year played five foreign matches and lost them all is not the most pleasant of duties for the Editor of the Marlburian.

The O.M.'s beat us by 3 goals and a try to 2 goals and 2 tries.

Clifton beat us by 1 goal to 0.

Cirencester beat us by 1 goal and 3 tries to 1 goal and 1 try.

The Nomads beat us by 2 goals and 2 tries to 1 goal and 1 try.

Keble beat us by 1 goal and 1 try to 0. So that we had scored against us 8 goals and 7 tries, and ourselves scored 4 goals and 4 tries. Such a result was rightly no small disappointment to the School, and we are bound to ask ourselves where the blame lay. Certainly not with our Captain, who from first till last took the utmost pains to select the best men, and set such an example in every way as a captain should.

Neither are

we inclined to attribute our failures to any individual shortcomings: the spirit we believe in every case was willing, and yet with a good Captain and a team not below the

tread more nearly in their steps we must expect to be heavily handicapped. Rome, we are told on the highest authority, was not built in a day, and we cannot change our style in a year, so we need not reproach ourselves over much. The change is coming by

are

Sept. 26th.-H. I. Grummett, (subscription) 10 6

.. -Box in Cloisters (Summer Term) ... 2 8 11 ,, 29th-Additional to July Offertory ... ... 10

, ,--Offertory ... ... ... ... ... 24 3 Nov. 12th.-Offertory ... ... ... ... ... ... 12 19 Dec. 17th.–Offertory ... ... ... ... ... ... 19 80

, ,-Box in Cloisters (Christmas Term).., 2 11 114 „ .-Sale of photos by H.M.Elder, Esq.,O.M. 6 8

£208 13 4}

To the Editor of the Marlburian. SIR,—May I draw attention, through the assistance of your columns, to a slight grievance, the rectification of which would be a great convenience ? The Blue Book, which contains the various subjects for the prizes which are competed for at the beginning of the term, does not usually arrive until a week, at least, of the holidays is past. In consequence there is never any great superfluity of time for working at the prizes, and it is not pleasant to waste any of the time that does remain. Moreover, I usually find that my bookseller makes some muddle or other in the ordering of the books. I should like to suggest that for the future the names of the publishers should be added; it would not, I should think, be a great trouble, and if it had been done last holidays it would have spared me a good deal of unnecessary bother.

I am, yours, etc.,

A.

10

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EXPENDITURE.

£ 8. d March 29th.-Curate's Stipend...

100 , ,-Cemetery Subscriptions

100 June 29th.—Curate's Stipend ...

... 37 10 0 Sept. 18th.-do do ... .... Dec. 14th.- do do ... ... ... ... ... 37 10 0 , ,-Savernake Hospital ...

,,-Preshute Parish ... ...
,,-St. Peter's do ...

... i 4 4 0 ,,-St. Mary's do

... ... 4 4 0 ,,-Society for Propagation of Gospel ... 15 15 0 Balance ... ... ...

... 14 1 41 £208 13 4}

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4

4

0

Natural History Society.

M. H. Gould, Secretary and Treasurer.

SCHOOL HONOURS.

A private meeting was held on Thursday, Jan. 24th. R. G. Durrant, Esq., and E. K. Chambers have joined the Committee, in place of G. F. Rod. well, Esq., and G. T. K. Maurice. Besides other smaller donations the Museum has been enriched by 52 very beautiful glass models, from Germany, of Sea Anemones, cuttle fish, &c., presented by Miss Preston. The last sheet of the large map of the Downs has been in the hands of the publisher for the last month. In the forthcoming report will be printed a handbook to the Maseum, prepared by the Rev. T. A. Preston. On Feb. 14th, J. A. Boardillon, Esq., O.M., will read a paper on “ Bengal as it is.” On March 6th, Dr. Rae, F.R.S., who has distinguished himself so greatly in the cause of Arctic explorations, will give some account of his five years' experience in the northern regions. For March 20th, W. Fergus, Esq., M.D. of Glasgow, has promised a paper on “the Eye.”

Hubert Brinton, Exhibitioner of New College, Oxford, 1st Class in Classical Moderations.

Henry Raywood Firth, Scholar of Worcester College, Oxford, 1st Class in Classical Moderations.

William Hastings Sharp, 1st Open Classical Scholarship at Trinity College, Oxford.

Edward Alexander Molony, Open Scholarship at Emmanuel College, Cambridge. *Walter H. Rotheram,

Open NominaFrancis W. D. Quinton.

tions to Godfrey Stuart Roupell.

Woolwich. * Passed direct from the School.

SCHOOL PRIZES.

Vth Form Poetry Prize-H. M. Giveen.

Hon. Mem.-E. F. Beyson.

NOTICE TO CONTRIBUTORS.

Contributions should be written on one side of 4 paper only, and should be accompanied by the name the writer, not necessarily for publication, but as guarantee of good faith.

NOTICE TO SUBSCRIBERS.

' MARLBOROUGH COLLEGE MISSION FUND, AND OFFERTORY ACCOUNTS, 1883.

RECEIPTS. 1883. Jan. 1st.–Balance in hand ... ... ... ... 8 7 34 , 26th,-Offertory ... ... ... ... ... ..

23 10 0 Feb. 27th. -Walter C. Stunt, Esq. (subscription)

1 1 0 March 7th.- Offertory... ... ... ... ... ... 16 2 6 April 2nd.-Offertory ... ... ... ... ... April 6th.-Box in Cloisters (Lent Term) ... 4 May 7th.-Offertory ... ... ... ... ...

.. 29th.-Editors of Marlburians ...... June 19th.-Offertory ... ... ... ... ... ... 17 5 July 23rd. -Offertory

100 ... ... 24 7 0

voor Nov

The subscription to the Marlburian is 6s. per yed or 2s. 2d. per term. P.0.0.'s should be made payal to 1. H. Sharp, The College, Marlborough.

Printed by Chas. PERKINS, at his General Printing Of

Waterloo House, Marlborough.

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