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THROUGH

ISLIN G T O N;

COMPRISING AN

HISTORICAL AND DESCRIPTIVE ACCOUNT

OF THAT

EXTENSIVE AND IMPORTANT DISTRICT, BOTH IN ITS ANCIENT

AND PRESENT STATE:

TOGETHER WITH SOME PARTICULARS OF THE MOST REMARKABLE

OBJECTS IMMEDIATELY ADJACENT.

BY

THOMAS CROMWELL,
AUTHOR OF OLIVER CROMWELL AND HIS TIMES,” “HISTORY AND

DESCRIPTION OF CLERKENWELL," &c.

EMBELLISHED WITH NUMEROUS ENGRAVINGS,

BY J. & H. S. STORER.

LONDON:
PRINTED FOR SHERWOOD, GILBERT, & PIPER,

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LONDON: GILBERT & RIVINGTON, PRINTERS,

$T. JOAN'S SQUARE.

PREFACE.

are o

To become acquainted with the most important and interesting facts and circumstances connected with the place of our birth, or in which we either are or have been resident, must be a desire congenial to all cultivated minds. And few are the suburban districts around the vast metropolis, which have been more fertile in changes, or are more inviting in their existing aspect, than that of ISLINGTON. The distant and unpretending village of a former age, besides having become almost an integral part of London through the immense increase of intermediate buildings, now comprises within itself a mass of population, respectability, and wealth, which confer upon it an importance exceeding that of many provincial towns: while, at the same time, the major part of the large parish of Islington continues to partake of the rural character, and may boast of features not often surpassed by the most distant rural tracts, whether as regards the delightful undulations of its surface, or the extent of the views it commands from a variety of elevated situations.

In giving an historical and descriptive account of a place favoured in so many important particulars, it has been the Author's study to avail himself of all the information bearing upon the subject before him, collected by previous historians of this and the neighbouring parishes; while he has also aimed to render his narrative something more than a dry detail of localities and facts, and especially to present a picture of ISLINGTON BOTH AS IT WAS AND NOW IS. In the first-mentioned of these respects—in the representation of Islington as it was—it is incumbent upon him to avow, that the basis of his account has been the work of the late local historian, Mr. John Nelson ; while it may be not less proper to remark, that had that gentleman been as skilful in the arrangement of his materials as he was diligent in collecting them, there would have been small occasion for any subsequent labours upon the same field, so far at least as antiquities formed his subject

matter.

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