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New Works published by E. Walker, 112 Fulton-st.

an analysis of his style of oratory. The book, we doubt not, will meet a ready sale.”— Whig. “A very handsome 1Smo, entitled ‘The Beauties of Henry Clay,’ as an accompaniment to the ‘Beauties of Daniel Webster.' Without any necessity of comparing those two beauties,' it may be said very safely that the present volume is a very interesting one, and one which does honor to the distinguished man from whose speeches the contents of the volume are selected. The work is accompanied by a very good introduction, embracing the most interesting points in Mr. Clay's biography.” Erpress. “This neat little volume contains some of the most admirable passages in the speeches of the great Western orator, in Congress and on Public occasions. It should be in the hands of every youthful aspirant to rhetorical distinction.” – Times. “Beautics of Clay, with a Memoir.—This is a little book of 235 pages, from the press of Edward Walker. It gives a just outline of one of the best men in Christendom, and choice selections from his many public speeches. The public cannot know too much of Henry Clay, for none can “know him but to love him,' or name him but to praise.” — New York Express. * Memoir and Beauties of Henry Clay. The great success of the volume published by Mr. Walker, entitled ‘The Beauties of Webster,' which ran through three editions in about as many months, has induced the publisher to send forth, in a similar style, a companion piece, entitled The Beauties of Henry Clay.' It is a neat and most acceptable little work.” Courier. “A match volume for the compilation from the writings of Daniel Webster, by the same editor. The admirers of the Kentucky statesman will find it a carcanet filled with gems, and every American who reads it will feel a pride in the thought that a countryman is its author.” —Signal.

Third AMERICAN EDITION OF

MY NIECE; OR THE STRANGER'S GRAVE.

Opinions of the Press.

“A deeply afflicting story of guilt, and sorrow, and death — well written, and impressing strongly the salutary admonition to beware of the first beginnings of sin. It is published in a very handsome style, and is a book to be commended for its literary merit, and still more for its moral tendency.” — New York Reriew.

“A thrilling story, with an awful catastrophe-well told, and original.” Ladies' Companion.

“This is a reprint of one of the most interesting and beautiful works for the young, to be found. The publisher deserves much praise for the admirable style in which the volume is put forth. Its typography is unexceptionably neat, and the embossed muslin binding is very elegant. New Works published by E. Walker, 112 Fulton-st.

We cheerfully commend this work to the attention of parents.”— New York Mirror. “This beautiful narrative, having been for some time out of print, is now reproduced in a style, both as regards the typographical execution and the binding, which cannot fail to procure for it a lasting popularity. It is indeed the most perfect bijou of its kind that has ever yet emanated from the American press, and both the publisher and the printer are entitled to great credit, for the excellent taste they have displayed, in presenting “My Niece' to the public in an attire so eacquisitely in keeping with her pretensions and intrinsic merit.”—New York Expositor. “This beautiful and instructive tale, which has been out of print for some years, comes before the public in a style worthy of all praise. Weautifully printed and beautifully bound, externally it resembles our best annuals, and internally a great superiority is evinced over the most of them. The instructive moral of the tale may be gathered from the author's concluding paragraph, which we extract: “‘Reader, I have told thee a tale of no ordinary wo; but it has a moral in it. Whatever thou mayst be, or however situated, guard well the first avenues which lead to sin; for if one false step be taken, thou canst not tell of how many evils it may be the prelude.’” New York Literary Gazette.

New Editions of the following Works to be had of all the Booksellers.

BEAUTIES OF DANIEL WEBSTER, with a copper-plate Portrait.
MEMOIR AND BEAUTIES OF HENRY CLAY.
MY NIECE; OR, THE STRANGER'S GRAVE.
WHEWELL AND HENRY ON MORALS.
REED'S COLLECTION OF HYMNS FOR THE CITIZENS OF
ZION.
ILLUSTRATIONS TO THE BIBLE.
ROMAN TALES.—By Edward MATURIN.
BONNELL's TOPOGRAPHICAL DESCRIPTION OF TEXAS,
with an account of the Indian Tribes.

All descriptions of Binding neatly executed. Gentlemen's Libraries fitted up and repaired. Music and Periodicals bound to pattern. Binding done for Libraries, Institutions, Societies, &c., on advantageous terms.

N. B. Gentlemen residing at a distance, experiencing difficulty, in getting their Binding done, will find it to their advantage by packing and directing them as above, stating style and price; they may rely upon their being well bound, at the lowest prices, and carefully packed and returned without delay. In all such cases, the owner will be charged with freight, and an order for payment for the binding, on a bank or

firm in New York, is required. E. WALKER, 112 Fulton-st.

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EMBRACING THE EXECUTIVE PROCLAMATIONS, RECOMMENDATIONS, PROTESTS, AND VETOES, FROM 1789 TO 1842,

together with

THE DECLARATION OF INDEPENDENCE AND CONSTITUTION OF THE UNITED STATES.

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In the Clerk's Office of the District Court of the United States, for the Southern District of New York.

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HAVING observed with regret the imperfect manner in which the last edition of Presidents' Messages was executed, it occurred to me that a correct and handsome edition, from their commencement to William H. Harrison's inaugural address, would not be unacceptable to my fellow citizens; believing as I do that, of all great national documents, few perhaps are more deserving permanent preserVation than those which emanate directly from the head of the executive government. Their intrinsic value and importance must be coeval with our national existence; they have respect no less to the interests of after times than to those of the present day; for while they mark the several great epochs of its political history, they at the same time afford the best exposition and clue to the right appreciation of its administrative proceedings. Apart from their public utility, these documents must ever be considered of great value, from the high rank they deservedly retain in their literary reputation, as gems of republican eloquence and rhetorical skill, exhibiting specimens of Some of the purest models of style which are to be found in our language.

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