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FOR SHARPE AND HAILES, PICCADILLY; TAYLOR AND HESSEY,
FLEET-STREET; CRADOCK AND JOY, PATERNOSTER-ROW;

AND J. M. RICHARDSON, CORNHILL.

1811.

methoisa solicitous to Europe in general; to which I must also add, a

aluse to deserve it. Bat, certaia dignity in yourself, that to say the least Be then to it, are valo-saw, that of the arraigoment of its prelates t; and 10 spect that ibe bow far the civil power, in the late and present to inclinations, reigo, has been indebted to your counsels and

the many national the public has received from your administration, that she id to base lord high chancellor of England. In the beginning of

and dea lor por 1700 be was removed from his post of lord chancellor; hva ducated at and the fear after was impeached of high crimes and mis

de Tangle. I dentapors by the house of commons, of which be was ac
Api,

pakly blead-quitted upon trial by the house of lords. He then retired
4 wipe data w a piece Royal Society. IR 1706 be proposed a bill for the regulation

arished hisuell to a studious course of life, and was chosen president of the ta Patatand the two last of the law; and the same year was one of the principal mamula bexten bi- nagets for the onion between England and Scotland. Ja

powing and 1708 he was made lord president of the council, from which all the cat post be was temored in 1710, upon the change of the minitants, barstry. In the latter end of Queen Aope's reiga, bis lordship s, ita tid the main paw very infirm in his health; wbich indisposition is sup been the base posed to bave been the reason that be held no other post than

ta te ciboca stat at the council table after the accession of King George I. 22 tree, He died of an apoplectic fit, April 26, 1716. Lord Somers, be

bet dracht sides being a most incorrupt lawyer, and honest statesznany Sterlin 1992 was a master-orator, a genius of the finest taste, a great patron Sedert vald Lapland of men of parts and learning, and was the person who re

as the practice of deemed Milton's 'Paradise Lost' from that obscurity in which ha ditored coed party-prejudice and hatred bad suffered it long to lie neglecte

sästy's absence, ed. He wrote several pieces on the subject of politics, and
Vies. In 1997 be translated certain parts of Plutarch and Ovid.

TO TRS
SIT HONOURABLE JOHN LORD SOMERS,

LAROS OF EVESTAN

| services which you have effected. Do what you
pet d'an impartial Spec. will

, the present age will be talking of your virtues,
azkiloring papers to one though posterity alone will do them justice,
serate and most ac

Other men pass through oppositions and con

tending interests in the ways of ambition; but your a ti libed character can great abilities have been invited to power, and imattrak etich endeavours portoned to accept of advancement. Nor is it sau lit, by promoting strange that this should happen to your lordships emily recomzending what who could bring into the service of your sovereigu zatil et ertagtertał to so- the arts and policies of ancient Greece and Rome;

as well as the most exact knowledge of our own <lar pay you, is offer- constitation in particular, and of the interests of tras particular in which of it) bas been always equal to those great honours

which have been conferred upon you. espainits

, a zeal for It is very well known how moch the church
and the most persuasive owed to you, in the most dangerous day it ever

Bat to enumerate the great advantages which
+ Trial of the seven bishops, June 19, 1689.

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se extraerdinary quali. wisdom.

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TO TAS

RIGHT HONOURABLE JOHN LORD SOMERS,

BARON OF EVESHAM

XY LORD,

services which you have effected. Do what you | Seould not act the part of an impartial Spec-will, the present age will be talking of your virtues, tator, if I dedicated the following papers to one though posterity alone will do them justice. who is not of the most consummate and most ac Other men pass through oppositions and conknowledged merit.

tending interests in the ways of ambition; but your None but a person of a finished character can great abilities have been invited to power, and imbe a proper patron of a work which endeavours portuned to accept of advancement. Nor is it to cultivate and polish human life, by promoting strange that this should happen to your lordship, ristne and knowledge, and by recommending what. who could bring into the service of your sovereign Bever may be either useful or ornamental to so- the arts and policies of ancient Greece and Rome; ciety,

as well as the most exact knowledge of our own I know that the homage I now pay you, is offer constitution in particular, and of the interests of ing a kind of violence to one who is as solicitous to Europe in general; to which I must also add, a ubun applause, as he is assiduous to deserve it. But, certain dignity in yourself, that (to say the least my lord, this is perhaps the only particular in which of it) bas been always equal to those great honours your prudence will be always disappointed. which have been conferred upon you.

While justice, candour, equanimity, a zeal for It is very well known how much the church the good of your country, and the most persuasive owed to you, in the most dangerous day it ever eloquence in bringing over others to it, are valu- saw, that of the arraignment of its prelates t; and able distinctions; you are not to expect that the how far the civil power, in the late and present public will so far comply with your inclinations, reign, has been indebted to your counsels and * te forbear celebrating such extraordinary quali-wisdom. ties. It is in vain that you have endeavoured to But to enumerate the great advantages which Conceal your share of merit in the many national the public has received from your administration,

* This illustrious patriot, who has been justly said to have lord high chancellor of England. In the beginning of "dispensed blessings by bis life, and planned them for pos- 1700 he was removed from his post of lord chancellor; terity,' was born at Worcester, 1652. He was educated at and the year after was impeached of high crimes and misOpered, and afterwards entered bimself of the Middle Temple, demeanors by the house of commons, of which he was acMere be studied the law with great vigour, judiciously blend- quitted upon trial by the house of lords. He then retired ting with polite literature. He soon distinguished himself to a studious course of life, and was chosen president of the

the bar; and in 1681 had a considerable share in a piece Royal Society. In 1706 be proposed a bill for the regulation lattaled, ' A just and modest Vindication of the two last of the law; and the same year was one of the principal maPertaments. In 1688 he was of counsel for the seven bi nagers for the union between England and Scotland. In Sups at tbeir trial, and argued with great learning and 1708 he was made lord president of the council, from which once against the dispensing power. In the convention post he was removed in 1710, upon the change of the miniweet net by the Prince of Orange's summons, Jan. 22, stry. In the latter end of Queen Anne's reign, his lordship 5854, le represented Worcester; and was one of the mana grew very infirm in his health; which indisposition is supons for the house of commons, at a conference with the house | posed to have been the reason that he held no

a seat at the council table after the accession of King George I. Ring William and Queen Mary to the throne, he was ap- He died of an apoplectic fit, April 26, 1716. Lord Somers, be pated solicitor-general, and received the honour of knight-sides being a most incorrupt lawyer, and honest statesman, Bd la 1692 be was made attorney-general, and in 1693 ad- was a master-orator, a genius of the finest taste, a great patron tenced to the post of lord keeper of the great seal of England of men of parts and learning, and was the person who reis lags be proposed an expedient to prevent the practice of deemed Milton's 'Paradise Lost' from that obscurity in which

prag the coun; and the same year was constituted one of party-prejudice and hatred had suffered it long to lie neglectSuburde justices of England during his majesty's absence,

ed. He wrote several pieces on the subject of politics, and

ed. He wrote several pieces on he was likewise in the two following years. In 1697 he translated certain parts of Plutarch and Ovid. deated Lord Somers, Baron of Evesham, and made + Trial of the seven bishops, June 29, 1689.

would be a more proper work for an history, than himself, without thinking the less * meanly of bi for an address of this nature.

own talents. But if I should take notice of all tha Your lordship appears as great in your private might be observed in your lordship, I should have life, as in the most important offices which you have nothing new to say upon any other character o borne. I would, therefore, rather choose to speak distinction. I am, MY LORD, of the pleasure you afford all who are admitted to

Yoor lordship's most devoted, your conversation, of your elegant taste in all the

Most obedient humble servant, polite arts of learning, of your great humanity and complacency of manners, and of the surprising in

THE SPECTATOR. fluence which is peculiar to you, in making every

• This must certainly be an error ; and for less we sbonld one who converses with your lordship prefer you to read more

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