The social condition and education of the people in England and Europe: shewing the results of the primary schools and of the division of landed property, in foreign countries, Том 1

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Longman, Brown, Green, and Longmans, 1850
 

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Сторінка 173 - ... dyer or the tailor. The country is incapable of greater cultivation than it has received. All has been done for it that industry and an extreme love of gain can devise. There is not a foot of waste land in the Engadine, the lowest part of which is not much lower than the top of Snowdon. Wherever grass will grow, there it is ; wherever a rock will bear a blade, verdure is seen upon it ; wherever an ear of rye will ripen, there it is to be found.
Сторінка 158 - The peasants are not, as with us, for the most part, totally cut off from property in the soil they cultivate, totally dependent on the labour afforded by others — they are themselves the proprietors. It is, perhaps, from this cause that they are probably the most industrious peasantry in the world. They labour busily, early and late, because they feel that they are labouring for themselves.
Сторінка 537 - How they lie down to rest, how they sleep, how they can preserve common decency, how unutterable horrors are avoided, is beyond all conception. The case is aggravated, when there is a young woman to be lodged in this confined space, who is not a member of the family, but is hired to do the field-work, for which every hind is bound to provide a female. It shocks every feeling of propriety to think, that, in a room, and within such a space as I have been describing, civilised beings should be herding...
Сторінка 187 - Give a man the secure possession of a bleak rock, and he will turn it into a garden ; give him * Arthur Young's Trtnelt m francl, ml. ip 88. « Ibid. p. 61. a nine years lease of a garden, and he will convert it into a desert.
Сторінка 91 - ... to the most effective use of the powers of the soil ; that no other existing state of agricultural economy has so beneficial an effect on the industry, the intelligence, the frugality, and prudence of the population...
Сторінка 529 - Another clergyman stated to me that he never recollected an instance of his having married a woman who was not either pregnant at the time of her marriage or had had one or more children before her marriage. Again : a third clergyman told me that he went to baptize the illegitimate child of one woman, who was...
Сторінка 536 - ... a decent condition thre-e or four weeks after they had come into one of these hovels. " In vain did they try to stop up the crannies, and to fill up the holes in the floor, and to arrange their furniture in tolerably decent order, and to keep out the weather. Alas ! what will they not suffer in the winter. ^ There will be no fireside enjoyment for them. They may huddle together for warmth, and heap coals on the fire ; but they will have chilly beds and a damp hearthstone ; and...
Сторінка 554 - ... hay-lofts together. So prevalent is want of chastity among the females, that, although I promised to return the marriage fee to all couples whose first child should be born after nine months from the marriage, only one in six years entitled themselves to claim it.
Сторінка 537 - It shocks every feeling of propriety to think that in a room, and within such a space as I have been describing, civilized beings should be herding together without a decent separation of age and sex. So long as the agricultural system, in this district, requires the hind to find room for a fellow-servant of the other sex in his cabin, the least that morality and decency can demand, is, that he should have a second apartment, where the unmarried female and those of a tender age should sleep apart...
Сторінка 448 - Each of these cellar-houses contains at the most two, and often, and in some towns generally, only one room. These rooms measure, in Liverpool, from 10 to 12 feet square. In some other towns they are rather larger. They are generally flagged. The flags lie directly upon the earth, and are generally wretchedly damp. In wet weather they are very often not dry for weeks together. Within a few feet of the windows of these cellars, rises the wall which keeps the street from falling in upon them, darkening...

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