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CHAPTER IX.

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Introduction of English capital has been relied on by many as a

means of improvement

Capital cannot be forced . - - •

Much capital belonging to Irishmen invested abroad

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Large importation of the public funds from England to Ireland

proves the difficulty of making a profitable investment, rather

than any want of capital - - - - -

If profitable occupation offered, accompanied by security, capital

would flow into the country - - -

Absenteeism of the landed proprietors often complained of

Evils of non-residence peculiarly felt during the past year

How to secure the residence of proprietors a difficult matter .

Compulsory laws are out of the question -

It must be made the interest of landlords to reside -

If land could be freely sold, they would probably dispose of their

estates to others, who could give their personal attention to

manage them - - -

Decay of manufactures in Ireland -

The growth of the factory system a main cause - -

Few persons of property in the South of Ireland have been willing

to undertake a business involving so much labour, and requir-

ing the investment of so much capital - -

High price of coals of minor importance . - - -

Manufacture of flax more slowly adapted itself to the factory

system than that of either wool or cotton . - -

Number of persons employed in flax mills . - - -

Combinations of workmen have had more effect in Ireland than

in England - - - - - -

Difference between wages of skilled and unskilled labour

Limiting the number of apprentices a principal means of main-

taining the rate of wages

Reference to the shipwrights of Dublin

Question of apprenticeship considered . - - -

An increase of manufactures would be very valuable to Ireland

The removal of restrictions, if such exist, is all that can be looked

for from the Government - - -

Want of a sufficient home-demand has an injurious influence

The linen manufacture and the cultivation of flax of the greatest

importance - - - - -

Soil and climate favourable to the growth of flax -

Flax may be made more valuable to Ireland than cotton is to

England - - - - -

Great extent of imports of flax, flax-seed, and oil-cake

Increased cultivation of flax and exports of limen would compen-

sate for the present deficient export of agricultural products .

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Great extent of emigration - - - -

Emigrants mostly consist of the young and enterprising who

possess some capital . - - - - -

Less advantageous to Ireland than to the emigrants themselves

Money sent back by emigrants to enable their friends to follow

them

Note on emigration -

Emigration to Great Britain - - -

Number of Irish residing in Great Britain in 1841 -

This emigration must continue, until the difference between the

condition of the working classes in the two countries cease to

exist - - - - - -

Landlords sometimes assist their tenants to emigrate - -

Emigration must be on a very large scale, in order to relieve the

labour market - - -

Difficulties of carrying such emigration into effect

Estimate of the expense necessary - - - -

Would not the same sum, if expended on improvements in Ire-

land, afford the means of employing those who might be assisted

to emigrate 2 . - - - - - -

Government assistance would interfere with private emigration

Cultivation of waste lands has been proposed

Important results to be expected from this -

Can it be best effected by government interference, or by pri-

vate enterprise? . - • - - - -

Much waste land has been reclaimed by cottiers, by means of

the cultivation of potatoes - - - -

Doubtful whether this plan be practicable with any other crop

Reclamation of waste lands on a large scale by government con-

sidered - - - - - -

Private enterprise sufficient if sale of land were free

Note—Extract from speech of Sir Robert Peel in illustration

Importance of improving the lands already under culture

M“Culloch's opinion on this subject . - - -

Subdivision of land into small farms has been objected to

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