Зображення сторінки
PDF
ePub

1920

ENGLISH AB-GRAMMAR, COMPOSITION, READING,

AND STUDY Tuesday, June 22

9 a.m. Three hours

[This is the ordinary or restricted examination, for those who wish to take English A and English B together. For separate question papers in English A and English B see pages 4 and 5.]

ENGLISH A-BOOKS FOR READING

I. Write a composition of not less than four hundred words on any one of the

following topics:

1. The military, family, or business life of today as contrasted with that

depicted in the Old Testament, the Odyssey, or the Aeneid. 2. The scene of action, and its appropriateness to the events, in any one

of the following novels or dramas: A Tale of Two Cities, Silas Marner, Quentin Durward, The House of the Seven Gables, The Merchant of

Venice, Julius Caesar, As You Like It. 3. Craft and cruelty as exemplified in any one or more of these same

novels and dramas.

4. The Sir Roger de Coverley Papers or The Sketch Book as a record of the

customs and background of another age or place. 5. Word-pictures as an aid to history in Macaulay's Lord Clive or

Parkman's Oregon Trail: their virtues and their defects. 6. The element of the heroic in the poetry that you have read by

Tennyson, Browning, Scott, or Arnold.

ENGLISH B_BOOKS FOR STUDY

PART 1-GRAMMAR

II. That it is unwise to be heedless ourselves while we are giving advice to others,

I will show in a few lines.

1. Is this sentence complex or compound? Why?
2. Change this to a simple sentence without altering the meaning.
3. Give the construction of (a) unwise; (6) to be heedless; and (c) to

others.

PART II—COMPOSITION

III. Write a composition of not less than two hundred words on one of the

following topics:
1. The industry or business that keeps my town alive.
2. The cost of advertising and its effect upon the cost of living.
3. Unjustifiable strikes.
4. Popular versus classical music.
5. School politics.
6. Why should we read poetry?
7. The problem of the immigrant in my town.
8. A book character who seems especially “human.'
9. Duties and privileges of citizenship in the United States.
10. The usefulness of the United States Senate.
11. The thought suggested by the late war which recurs most often to me.
12. The best kind of place for summer recreation.
13. What the library has meant to me.

PART III-LITERATURE

IV. Answer a and either b or c.

a) Give the important facts of Shakespeare's life and tell what you can

of the period in which he lived.
6)

Cure her of that.
Canst thou not minister to a mind diseas'd,
Pluck from the memory a rooted sorrow,
Raze out the written troubles of the brain,
And with some sweet oblivious antidote
Cleanse the stuff d bosom of that perilous stuff

Which weighs upon the heart?
Give the occasion of the foregoing speech, and explain the italicized words

and phrases. Which seems to you to play the greatest part in the down-
fall of Macbeth, his ambition, his fear, or his imagination? Give full
reasons for your answer.
c) How all occasions do inform against me
And spur my dull revenge!

Rightly to be great
Is not to stir without great argument,
But greatly to find quarrel in a straw
When honour's at the stake.

[ocr errors]

(THIS EXAMINATION IS CONTINUED ON PAGE 3)

On what occasion does Hamlet speak these words ? Explain their meaning

in your own words. Why does he reproach himself as he does in the first two lines ? Show in what specific ways Hamlet may seem to deserve this reproach. Do you yourself think that he deserves it?

V. Answer either a or b.

a) Do you regard Milton's use of allusion as a grace or as an encum

brance to his verse ? Illustrate your answer by reference to particular passages in L'Allegro, Il Penseroso, or Comus in which he employs allusions of (1) a mythological, (2) a pastoral, or (3) a literary nature.

6)

The Terror of Death
When I have fears that I may cease to be
Before my pen has glean'd my teeming brain,
Before high pilèd books in charact'ry
Hold like rich garners the full-ripen'd grain;

When I behold upon the night's starr'd face,
Huge cloudy symbols of a high romance,
And think that I may never live to trace
Their shadows with the magic hand of chance;

And when I feel, fair Creature of an hour!
That I shall never look

upon
thee

more,
Never have relish in the faery power
Of unreflecting lovethen on the shore

Of the wide world I stand alone, and think
Till Love and Fame to nothingness do sink.

-KEATS.

How does the form of the foregoing sonnet differ from the sonnet form used

by Wordsworth? Explain why Keats should be writing of death, and show how his desires as here expressed are partially, at least, realized in the Ode to Autumn and Ode on a Grecian Urn or any other of his poems to which you may wish to refer.

VI. Answer either a or b.

a) What were the principles underlying Lord North's policy in regard

to America ? Upon what different principles does Burke base his

objections to Lord North's project? 6) What were the internal conditions in America which led Washington

to argue as he did for a firm union? What bearing have this situation and this argument upon the present problem of international union ?

1920

ENGLISH A-GRAMMAR, COMPOSITION, AND READING Tuesday, June 22

Two hours

9 a.m.

[This is the ordinary or restricted examination. Those who wish to take English A and English B together should take English AB, printed on pages 1-3.]

PART I-GRAMMAR

I.

With little here to do or see
Of things that in the great world be,
Sweet Daisy! oft I talk to thee,

For thou art worthy.
1. Point out the clauses in the foregoing sentence, and tell the function

of each. What kind of sentence is it, simple, complex, or compound? 2. Explain the grammatical construction of (a) With little here to do or see, (6) Sweet Daisyl and (c) worthy.

PART II-LITERATURE
II. Write a composition of not less than four hundred words on any one of the

following topics:
1. The military, family, or business life of today as contrasted with that

depicted in the Old Testament, the Odyssey, or the Aeneid.
2. The scene of action, and its appropriateness to the events, in any of the

following novels or dramas: A Tale of Two Cities, Silas Marner, Quentin Durward, The House of the Seven Gables, The Merchant of

Venice, Julius Caesar, As You Like It.. 3. Craft and cruelty as exemplified in any one or more of these same

novels and dramas. 4. The Sir Roger de Coverley Papers or The Sketch Book as a record of the

customs and background of another age or place. 5. Word-pictures as an aid to history in Macaulay's Lord Clive or

Parkman's Oregon Trail: their virtues and their defects. 6. The element of the heroic in the poetry that you have read by Tennyson,

Browning, Scott, or Arnold.

PART III—COMPOSITION
III. Write a composition of not less than two hundred words on one of the

following topics:
1. The industry or business which keeps my town alive.
2. How I should like to vote in the coming election, and why.
3. A“drive" for better English.
4. Trees with character.
5. The hobby which I have clung to most persistently.
6. The thought suggested by the late war which recurs most often to me.
7. My own experience with the high cost of living.
8. The best kind of place for summer recreation.
9. What the library has meant to me.
10. My early play and playmates.

1920 ENGLISH B-GRAMMAR, COMPOSITION, AND STUDY Tuesday, June 22

9 a.m. Two hours

[This is the ordinary or restricted examination. Those who wish to take English A and English B together should take English AB, printed on pages 1-3.)

PART 1-GRAMMAR
I. That it is unwise to be heedless ourselves while we are giving advice to others,

I will show in a few lines.
1. Is this sentence complex or compound? Why?
2. Change this to a simple sentence without altering the meaning.
3. Give the construction of (a) unwise, (6) to be heedless, and (c) to others.

PART II-COMPOSITION
II. Write a composition of not less than four hundred words on one of the

following topics:
1. Duties and privileges of citizenship in the United States.
2. The cost of advertising and its effect upon the cost of living.
3. Unjustifiable strikes.
4. Popular versus classical music.
5. School politics.
6. Why should we read poetry?
7. The problem of the immigrant in my town.
8. A book character who seems especially “human.”
9. The usefulness of the United States Senate.

PART III-LITERATURE

Omit any one of questions III, IV, and V. III. Answer a and either b or C.

a) Give the important facts of Shakespeare's life and tell what you can of

the period in which he lived.
b)

Cure her of that.
Canst thou not minister to a mind diseas'd,
Pluck from the memory a rooted sorrow,
Raze out the written troubles of the brain,
And with some sweet oblivious antidote
Cleanse the stuf'd bosom of that perilous stuff

Which weighs upon the heart?
Give the occasion of the foregoing speech, and explain the italicized words

and phrases. Which seems to you to play the greatest part in the downfall of Macbeth, his ambition, his fear, or his imagination? Give full reasons for your answer.

(THIS EXAMINATION IS CONTINUED ON PAGE 6)

« НазадПродовжити »