Matthew Paris's English History: From the Year 1235 to 1273, Том 2

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Сторінка 21 - Cumin ing, an illustrious and very powerful baron of Scotland, and some others of that kingdom, had fortified two suspected castles in Galway and Lothian, to the prejudice of the king of England, and contrary to the charters of their ancestors ; also that the above-named noble had entered into a confederacy with the French, and had received some banished men and fugitive enemies of his ; for instance, Geoffrey Marsh at this present time, and some others formerly ; thus, as it were, knowingly endeavouring...
Сторінка 54 - Warren, on behalf of the general community of the kingdom, was sent, on the morrow of the feast of the apostles Peter and Paul, to Master Martin, the oft-mentioned pope's clerk, who was staying at the New Temple at London.
Сторінка 285 - This year passed, temperate and. calm, filling the barns with abundance of corn, and making the presses flow with wine ; so much so, that a measure of corn fell in price to two shillings, and a cask of choice wine was freely sold for two marks ; the orchard fruit was very abundant in some places, but scanty in others ; but the gourd-worms entirely destroyed everything green where the disease made its way into the shrubs. The events of the year proved hostile to the Holy Land, inimical to Italy, deadly...
Сторінка 260 - Frederick, he groaned in spirit, and with reiterated sighs, as though deeply wounded m2 for the death of Thaddeus and the insult of the pope wounded the heart of Frederick even to bitterness, more than all his other losses ; for we, who read and examine into the annals of history, never found such an. instance of intense and inexorable hatred as that which existed between the pope and Frederick.
Сторінка 508 - ... lower classes so many laborious services, and harassed them by so many robberies and injuries, that of all nations existing, England appeared to be in the lowest condition. In one place the houses of merchants, in another their carts, and their small possessions, were forcibly seized on, and nothing was left as an indemnity for them, save tallages and ridicule. On seeing these proceedings, some even of the more noble of the English, whom I am ashamed to mention by name, said in their pride, and...
Сторінка 529 - King and his nobles. So far back as the year 1252, when Henry III ruthlessly infringed one of the charters of the Order, the Prior of Clerkenwell sought audience of the offender, and laid his complaint before him in a very decided manner, at which the enraged King cried out in a loud voice : — "You prelates and religious men, and especially you Templars and Hospitallers, have so many liberties and charters that your superfluous possession of them makes you proud, and from pride drives you on to...
Сторінка 289 - The abbat, as he could not honourably reply otherwise, answered, — " I have sometimes given, but never lent ; nor will I now !" and he immediately borrowed that sum from the Caursins, at heavy interest, that he might satisfy the wants of this beggar-king. About the same time, too, the king worried the abbat of Peterborough with similar entreaties for money, declaring that it would be greater charity to bestow pecuniary assistance on him than on any beggar at his door ; but as the abbat excused...
Сторінка 83 - ... ever built or founded either churches, monasteries, hospitals, or other pious places. Now these, then, are not light, but convincing grounds for suspicions of heresy being entertained against him ; since civil law declares that they are contained in the list of heretics, and ought to submit to the sentences pronounced against them, who have been detected in deviating, even in a slight degree, from the judgment and rule ot the Catholic religion. Besides this, the kingdom of Sicily, which is the...
Сторінка 514 - ... her will, and one of compulsion (she having been given to Faulkes by the tyrant John, who blushed not at the perpetration of any wickedness), nobility was united to meanness, piety to impiety, beauty to dishonour ; and concerning which union a certain writer justly says, — Lex connectit eos, amor et concordia lecti : Sed lex qualis ? amor qualis ? concordia qualis ? Lex exlex, amor exosus, concordia discors. [Law makes them one, love and the nuptial rites : What law, what love, what tie such...
Сторінка 247 - ... 166 The third mention of Matthew's visit occurs in his account of a terrible fire in Bergen, followed, a day or two later, by a fearful thunderstorm. " A sudden flash of lightning struck a large ship which had arrived from England during the night, killing one man in it, wounding or severely bruising...

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