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Railway Employes in the United States.

COMPARATIVE SUMMARY OF EMPLOYES AND AVERAGE DAILY COMPENSATION,
(From Statistical Report of the Interstate Commerce Commission.)

1905.
1904.

1903.

1902.

AVKRAGE
Per 100

Per 100
CLASS.

DAILY
Num-

Per 100
Num-
miles

Per 100
Num-
miles

Num-
ber.

miles

COMPENSATION. ber.

ber. of line.

miles

ber.
of line.
of line.

of line. 1905. 1904. 1903. General officers...

5,536 2 5,165 2

4,842

2 4,816 2 11.74 11.61 11.27 Other oflicers 5,706 3 5,375 8 5,201 3 5,039

6.02 6.07 5.76 General office clerks... 51,284 24 46,137 22 42,218 21

37,5701 19 2.24 2.22) 2. 21 Station agents......

35,245 -16 34,918 16 34,892 17 33,478 17 1.93 1.93 1.87 Other station men

125,180 58 120,002 57 120,724 59 105,433) 53 1.71 1.69 1.64 Enginemen.

54,817 25 52,451 25 52,993 26 48,318 24 4.12 4.10 4.01 Firemen.......

57,892 27 55,004 23 56,041 27 50,651 25 2.38 2.35) 2.28 Conductors

41,061 19 39,645 19 39,741 19 35,070 18 3.50 3.50 3.38 Other trainmen.

111,405 51 106,734 50 104,885 51 91,383 46 2.31 2.27 2.17 Machinists.

47.018 22 46,272 22 44,819 22 39,145 19 2.65 2.61 2.50 Carpenters.

56,089 26 53,646 25 56,407 27 61,698 26 2.25 2.26 2.19 Other shopmen..

176,348 81 159,472 75 154,635 75 136,579 68 1.93 1.91) 1.86 Section foremen.

38.217 18 37,609 18 37,101 18 35,700 18 1.79 1.781 1.78 Other trackmen..

311,185 143 289,044 136 300,714 147 281,075 140 1.32 1.33 1.31 Switchtenders, watchmen.. 45,532 21 46,262 22 19,961

50,489 25 1.79 1.77 1.76 Tel. operators, despatchers.. 31,963 15 30,425 14 30,984 15 28,244 14 2.19 2.15 2. (8 Emplo's-acct float'g equip't. 8,753

7,495 3 7,949

7,426 4 2.17 2.17 3.11 All other emplo's and labor's 178,905 82 160,565 76 168,430 82 147,201

1.83 1.82 1.77 Total.

1,382,196 637 1,296,121 611 1,312,5371 639 1,189,315) 594

Railway Accidents in the United States.

222

(From Statistical Report of the Interstate Commerce Commission.)
EMPLOYES.

PASSENGERS.
OTHER PERSONS.

TOTAL, YEAR ENDING JUNE 30.

Killed. Injured. Killed. Injured. Killed Injured. Killed. Injured. 1897.

1,693
27,667

2,795 4,522 6,269 6,437 36,731 1898.. 1,958 31,767 221 2,945 4,680

6,176
6,859

40,882 1899..

2,210 34,923
239 3,442 4,674 6,250

7,123 44,620 1900..

2,550 36 643
249 4,128 5,066

6,549 7,865 50,320 1901

2,675 41.142

282 4,988 5,498 7,209 8,455 53,339 1902

2,969 50,524 845 6,683 5,274 7,455 8,588 64,662 1903.. 3,606 60,481 855 8,231

5,879 7,841 9,840 76,553 1904

3,632 67,067

441

9,111 5,973 2,977 10,046 81,155 1905. 3,361 66,833 537 1 10,457

5,805 8,718 9.703 86,008 The total number of passengers carried in 1905 was 738,834,667, as against in 1904, 715,419.682, 694,891,535 in 1903, 649,878,505 in 1902, 607,278,121 in 1901, 576,865,230 in 1900, 623,176,508 in 1899, 501,066.681 in 1898, and 489,445,198 in 1897.

***13

EMPLOYES.

PASSENGERS. OTHER PERSONS.
KIND OF ACCIDENT.
Killed. Injured. Killed. Injured.

Killed.

Injured. Coupling or uncoupling...

230

3, 543 Collisions.

419 3,617 196 3,336

480 Derailments.

253 1,906 145 2,717

60

312 Parting of trains.

25 648

109 13

16 Locomotives or cars breaking down.

34 267

18
2

10 Falling from trains, locomotives, or cars.

479 0,330

52
454

375 655 Jumping on or off trains, locomotives, or cars, 172 4,537 88 1, 294 460 1,628 Struck by trains, locomotives, or cars.

1,192 2,090 31 1374,538 4,026 Overhead obstructions..

64 890 Other causes....

305 14, 226 ***2 2,180

1,187 Total.

3,173 37,054

10, 245 15.727 8,314 Two nundred and seventy persons were killed and 30,395 injured in handling traffic. tools, machinery, supplies, etc., and in getting on or off locomotives or cars at rest and from other causes.

206

533

Railroad Clubs. Canadian R’y Club.-James Powell, Secretary, Box 7, St. Lambert, Montreal, Que. Dentrol R'y Člub. -Harry D. Vought, Secretarv, 62 Liberty Street, New York City. Jowa R’y Člnb. - W.B. Harrison, Secretary, Union Station, Des Moines, Iowa. New England R. R. Club.-E. L. Janes. Secretary, 185 Summer Street, Boston, Mass. New York R. R. Club.-Harry D. Vought, Secretary, 62 Liberty Street, New York City. Northern R’y Club, Dulnth. Minn. Northwest R’y Club.-T. W. Flannagan. Secretary, "Soo Line" Shops, Minneapolis, Minn. R'y Olnb of Pittsburgh.-J.D. Conway, Sec’y, General Offices P. & L. E. R.R., Pittsburgh, Pa. Richmond R. R. Club. F. 0. Robinson. Sec' y. Room 16. 8th & Main Streets, Richmond, Va. Rocky Mountain R’y Club.-M. M. Currier, Secretary, Box 229, Colorado City, Col.

L'S R’y U100.-B. W. Frau.othal, Secretary, 4th Floor, Union Station, St. Louis, Mo. Sowhern and southwester R’y Club.-W. A. Love, Box 755. Atlanta, Gan Western R’y cimp.-Jos. W. Taylor, 390 Old Colony Building, Chicago, Ill.

Railroad Speed.

NOTABLE FAST RUNS OF PASSENGER TRAINS FOR LONG DISTANCES,

DATE.

Railroad.

Terminals.

May, 1848. Great Western (England).

London-Didcot
July, 1885. West Shore

East Buffalo-Frankfort..
Aug., 1888. London, N.W.& Caledonian. London-Edinburgh
Aug. 1894. Plant System, Atlantic Coast Line Jacksonville-Richmond.
April 1895. Pennsylvania.

Camden-Atlantic City..
Aug. , 1895. London & Northwestern

London- Aberdeen...
Sept., 1895. New York Central & H. R. New York-Buffalo...
Sept., 1895. N.Y.Central “World Flyer'' Albany-Syracuse.....
Feb., 1897. Chicago, Burlington & Quincy... Chicago-Denver...
April, 1897. Lehigh val., Black Diamond Exp. Alpine, N. Y.-Geneva Junc., N. Y.
Aug., 1897. Union Pacific

North Platte-Omaha...
May, 1900. Burlington Route.

Burlington-Chicago.
Mar, , 1902. Burlington Route..

Eckley-Wray.
Aug. , 1902. 20th Century Ltd.,'' on L. Shore Kendallville-Toledo..
Mar., 1903. Atlantic Coast Line.

Jacksonville-Savannah.
May, 1903. 20th Century Ltd.,' on L. Shore Toledo-Elkhart..
July, 1903. eat Western (England). London-P ymouth...
April, 1904. Michigan Central.

Niagara Falls--Windsor.
July, 1904. Great Western (England). Paddington-Bristol...
Nov., 1904. Pennsylvania..

Crestline-Fort Wayne. June, 1905. Pennsylvania

Chicago--Pittsburgh.. June, 1905. Lake Shore & Mich. Southern.. Buffalo-Chicago. June, 1905. Pennsylvania..

New York-Chicago. June, 1905. New York Central

Chicago-New York. July, 1907. Pennsylvania

Washington, O. ---Fort Wayne. Oct. , 1905.. Pittsburgh, Ft. Wayne & C. Crestline, 0. -Clark Junc., Ind.

*Including stops. Excluding stops.

INCLUSIVE Distance, Time,

Miles Miles.

per H, M.

Hour. 53.25 0.47 68 201. 7 4.00 50.4 400 7. 38 52.4 661.5 12.51 51. 48 58.3 0.4534 76.50 540 8.32 63. 28 436.50 6.47 64.33* 148 2.10 68.3 1,025 18.52 56.74

43.96 0.33 80 291 4.39

63.49 205.8 3.08%% 65.51 14.8 0.9 98.7 91 1.15 72.8 172 2. 32 70.7 133.4 1.54 70. 2 246 3. 54 63. 13 225.66 3.11470.74 118.5 (1.34 84.6 131 1. 53

69.56 468

17.20 63.53 525 7.50

69.691 897 16.3 56.07 960.52 15.56 60.281

81 1.4 75.84 257.4 13.27 74.55

FASTEST RECORDED RUNS FOR SHORT DISTANCES.

Dis

Miles DATE.

Time,
Railroad.

Terminals,

tance,
M. S.

per Miles.

Hour. May, 1893.. Central & H.R..

Crittenden-“Empire State Exp.'' 1 0.32 112.5 Aug., 1895. Pennsylvania....

Landover-Anacosta....

5.1 3.00 102 Jan., 1899.. Burlington Route..

Siding-Arion..

2.4 1.20 108 Mar., 1901.. Plant System.

Run from Fleming to Jacksonville. 5 2.30 120 Jan., 1903. N. Y. Central & H. R..

Palmyra--Macedon...

7.29 4.00 109.35 April, 1904. Michigan Central......

Crisman-Lake....

3.732.00 111.90 July, 1904.. Phila. & Reading.

Egg Harbor -Brigantine Junction. 4.8 2.30 115.20 Oct. , 1904.. N. Y. Central & H.R.

Croton-Ossining....

3.51 2.00 105 The fastest time on record for a distance of over 440 miles was made by the Lake Shore and Michigan Southern R.R. from Buffalo to Chicago, in June, 1905, noted above. The fastest long-distance run less than 440 miles was on the New York Central R.R. September 11, 1895, from New York to Buffalo, 436 1-2 miles, in 407 minutes actual time. Average speed, 64 1-3 miles an hour, with two stops and 28 slow-ups, and on January 1, 1903, from Albany to Buffalo, 302 miles, in 295 minutes.

Among the fastest regular trains in the United States, for a shorter distance, are believed to be the New York Central “ Empire State Express," between New York and Albany, 148 miles in 160 minutes, and the “Congressional Limited,” on the Pennsylvania Railroad, which makes the run from Jersey City to Washington in 4 hours, 46 minutes, a distance of 227 miles.

On August 15, 1898, on P. & R. and C. R. R. of N.J., “Royal Blue Line,” between Elizabeth, N.J., and Jenkintown, a distance of 69 miles, in 61 minutes, including 2 "slow-ups," some of the miles being traversed in 38 seconds.

The quickest run between Jersey City and Washington, 231 miles, was made on the Central Railroad of New Jersey, March 2, 1897 (by a special train, bearing Vice-President-elect Hobart and party), in 4 hours 8 minutes, making the running time, including "glow-ups" for taking water, changing engines, etc., 60 miles an hour. This beat the time of the “Aunt Jack” train, made by the Madison Square Theatre Company March 10, 1890, which was 4 hours 18 minutes, each way, going and returning. The fastest long-distance foreign trains, including all stops, are, according to the "Railroad Gazette, as follows:

Inclusive Speed
ROUTE.
Railways.

From
Το

Time-
Miles.
Hrs. Min.

in Miles per

Hour. Sud Express... Orleans and Midi. Paris.. Bayonne....

8 59

6

54.13 East Coast.. Gt. N. and N. E. Railways.. London..... Edinburgh.. 3931 7 45 3

50.77 West Coast.... L. & N. W. and Caledonian Rys. 'London..... Glasgow....

8 00
3

50.18 Of long-distance runs in France one is made on tiie Northern Railway of France by the Paris-Calais express, which runs 185 miles in 1844 minutes, or a fraction over a mile a minute, ailowing for a stoppage of 24 minutes at Amiens.

Other notable long-distance fast runs: February 14-15, 1897 ---Pennsylvania Railroad and C., B. and Q., Jersey City to Denver, 1,937 miles, in 48 hours; average speed, 40.3 miles per hour. August 29-31, 1891-Canadian Pacific, Vancouver to Brockville, 2,802 miles, in 77 hours 9 minutes; average speed, 36.32 miles per hour.

The Jarrett and Palmer special theatrical train, Jersey City to Oakland (San Francisco), 3,311 miles, June, 1876, 83 hours 45 minutes; average speed, 39.53 miles per hour.

In October, 1905, the "Harriman Special” made the run from Oakland to Jersey City (3,239 miles) in 73 hours, 12 minutes, or 41.30 miles per hour. In May, 1906, the “Harriman Special ” made the run from Oakland, Cal., to New York City in 71 hours, 27 minutes.

The Scott Special”left Los Angeles, Cal., July 9, 1905, and arrived in Chicago (2,445.5 miles), July 11, having made the run in 44 hours 54 minutes, maintaining an average speed while in motion of 51 miles an hour.

Stops.

48674

4012

Railroad Commissions.
INTERSTATE COMMERCE COMMISSION.

WASHINGTON, D. C.
Martin A. Knapp, of New York, Chairman. Franklin K. Lane, of California
Judson C. Clements, of Georgia,

Edgar E. Clark, of Iowa.
Charles A. Prouty, of Vermont.

James S. Harlan, of Illinois.
Francis M. Cockrell, of Missouri.
Edward A. Moseley, Secretary.

Martin S. Decker, Assistant Secretary. STATE RAILROAD COMMISSIONERS, Alabaina Railroad Commission-Mont- Missouri Railroad and Warehongo gomery, B. B. Comer, President, Birmingham; Commission-Jefferson City. Joseph P. Rice, W. T. Sanders, Athens; W. C. Tunstall, Greens- Chairman; John A. Knott, F. A. Wightman;T. M. boro; V. C. Griffin, Secretary, Montgomery. Bradbury, Secretary. Arkansas Railroad Comin ission-Little

Montana-No' reports Rock. J. W. Phillips, Chairman; B. B. Hudgins, taxation.

required except for J. E. Hampton;

Wm. E. Floyd, Secretary. California Railroad Commission-A. C.

Nebraska State Board of Equalization

Lincoln,
Irwin, President, Marysville: Adam Andrew,
San Francisco; Orrin $. Henderson, Stockton; Nevada-Secretary of State, Carson City.
Judson C. Brusie, Secretary, San Francisco.

New Hampshire Railroad Commission Colorado State Board' of Equalization--Concord. Henry M. Putney, Chairmau, ManR. R. Leese, Secretary, Denver, Col.

chester; Arthur G. Whittemore, Clerk, Dover. Connecticut Board of Railroad Commis

New Jersey-Comptroller, Trenton. sioners-Hartford. A. F. Gates, Chairman,

New York Board of Railroad Commis. Hartford; William 0. Seymour, Ridgefield; 0, R. Fyler, Torringtou; Henry F. Billings, Clerk,

sioners-Albany. George W. Dunn, Chairman;

F. M. Baker, J. M. Dickey, Geo. W. Aldridge; Hartford.

Florida Railroad Commissionery-Talla- H. N. Rockwell; J. S. Kennedy, Secretary.
hassee. J. B. Browne, Chairman; R. Hudson North Carolina Corporation Commis-
Burr, J. L. Morgan, White Springs; Royal C. sion - Raleigh. Franklin McNeill, Chairman;
Dunn, Secretary.

Sam. L. Rogers, E. O. Bedingfield; H. C. Brown,
Georgia Railroad Commission - H. W. Secretary.
Hill, Chairman, Greenville; Joseph F. Brown, North Dakota Commissioners of Rail.
Marietta; 0, B. Stevens, Cornelia; Geo. F. Mont- roads-Bismarck. 0.-S. Deisem, Chairman,
gomery, Secretary, Marietta.

La Moure; E. A. Stafne, Galchu t;'J. ChristianIdalo State Board of Equalization, sen, Towner; C. C. Hammond, Secretary, Ashley. Robert S. Bragaw, State Auditor and Secretary, Ohio Commissioner of Railroads – CoBoise City.

lumbus, J. C. Morris, Chairman; O. H. Hughes, plinois Railroad and Warehouse Com-0. P Gothlin; H. D. Maniugton, Secretary, Comission--Springfield. James S. Neville, Chair-lumbus. man, Bloomington; Arthur L. French, Chapin; Oregon Railroad Commission-Abolished Isaac L. Ellwood, De Kalb; Wm. Kilpatrick, by the Legislature, October, 1898. Secretary, Springfield. Indiana Board of Railroad Commis.

Pennsylvania Department of Internal Union B. Hunt, Chairsioners-Indianapolis.

Affairs-Harrisburg. Isaac B. Brown, Secreman; Wm. J. Wood, C. V. McAdams; Chas. B. tary; Theo. B. Klein, Sup't Bureau of Railways. Ritev, Secretary.

Rhode Island Railroad CommissionerIowa Board of Railroad Commissioners Providence. E. L. Freeman. -- Des Moines. D. J. Palmer, Chairman; N. S. South Carolina Railroad CommissionKetcham, E. A. Dawson; D. N. Lewis, Secre- erg-J. H. Wharton, Chairman, Waterloo; B. L. tary.

Caughmans, Columbia; J. H. Earle, Greenville; Kansas Railroad Commission - Topeka. D. P. Duncan, Secretary, Columbia. A. D. Walker, Chairman ; J. W. Robinson, G. W.

South Dakota Railroad Commissioners Wheatley; Cyrus Anderson, Secretary.

-Sioux Falls. Frank Le Cocq, Jr., Chairman, Kentucky Railroad Commission-Frank. Harrison; D. H. Smith, Miller; W. G. Smith, fort. C. C. McChord, Chairman, Springfield; McD. Sturgis; Wm. H. Stanley, Secretary, Sioux Falls. Ferguson, Paducah; A. T. Siler, Williamsburg;

Tennessee Railroad Commissioners Moses R. Glenn, Secretary, Frankfort.

Nashville, Louisiana Railroad Commission-Baton Enloe, Thomas L. Williams; Frank Avent, Sec'y.

J. N. McKenzie, Chairman; B. A. Rouge. C. L. de Fuentes, Chairman,

New

Texas Orleans; Overton Cade, Youngsville; W. L. Fos

Railroad Commission - Austin. ter, Shreveport; W. M. Barrow, Secretary, Ba- L. J. Storey, Chairman; O. B. Colquitt, Allison ton Rouge.

Mayfield; E. R. McLean, Secretary. Maine Railroad Commissionerg-Augusta. Vermont State Railroad Commissioners Joseph B. Peaks, Chairman, Dover; Parker -Montpelier. F. C. Smith, Chairman, St. Albans; Spotford, Bucksport; B. F. Chadbourne, Bidde- Henry 8. Bingham, Bennington; Geo. T. Howard, ford; E. C. Farrington, Clerk, Augusta.

Craftsbury. Maryland-State Tax Commissioner, Bu- Virginia Railroad Commission -- Richchanan Schley, Annapolis.

mond. Beverly T. Crump, Chairman, RichMassachusetts Board of Railroad Com- mond; Henry č. Stuart, J. E. Willard; R. T. Wilmissioners-Boston, James E. Jackson, Chair

son, Clerk man, Fall River; Clinton White, Melrose; Washington-H, A. Fairchild, Chairman, BellGeorge W. Bishop, Newtonville; Charles E.

ingham; J. S. McMillin, Seattle; J. C. Lawrenca, Mann, Clerk, Malden.

Olympia. Michigan Commissioner of Railroads

West Virginia-State Auditor, Charleston.. Lansing. Theron W. Atwood; D. H. Clark, Deputy Commissioner,

Wisconsin Railroad CommissionersMinnesota Railrond anal Warehonse Madison. John Barnes, Chairman; B. H. Meyer. Commission-St. Paul. Ira B. Mills, Chairman; Halford Erickson, J.W. Thomas; John M. WinterW. E. Young, C. F. Staples; A. C. Clausen, Sec- botham, Secretary. retary, St. Paul.

Wyoming, Board of Equalization * Mississippi Railroad Commission-Jack- Cheyenne. The State Treasurer, President; the son. S. D. McNair, President; R. L. Bradley, J. State Auditor, Secretary; the Secretary of State, C. Kincannon; T. R. Maxwell, Secretary.

Member; F. J. Niswander, Clerk.

[graphic]

Miles of

Cost of Roads and Passengers
COUNTRIES.

Tons of Freight
Railroad. Equipments.

Carried.
Carried.

Receipts. Expenditures. Europe

175,000 $20,100,000,000 2,700,000,000 1,145,000,000 $1,800,000,000 $1,040,000,000 America .....

250,000 15,800,000,000 700,000,000 1,250,000,000 1,800,000,000 1,300,000,000 Africa .... 12,500 760,000,000 36,000,000 11,000,000 65,000,000 34,000,000 Asia

37,500 1,500,000,000 248,000,000 42,000,000 120,000,000 60,500,000 Australia ...

15,000 760,000,000 62,000,000 13,500,000 55,000,000 33,000,000 Total 490,000 $38,920,000,000 3,746,000,000 2,461,500,000 $3,840,000,000 $2,427,500,000

These estimates are for 1900. Cost of roads and equipmeuts in 1905 was estimated at $42,000,000,000, or an average of $76,000 per mile.

RAILROAD MILEACE OF THE WORLD. Following statistics are of date Jan. 1, 1905: Total mileage, 550,735, made up as follows: 279,975 miles in America, 189,774 miles in Europe, 47,974 miles in Asia, 16,202 miles in Africa, and 16,810 miles in Australasia. Of the mileage of European railroads Germany stands first

(34,016) followed in their order by Russia (33, 286), France (28, 266), Austria-Hungary (24, 261), the United Kingdom (22,592), Italy (10,025), Spain (8,656), Sweden and Norway (7,730).

Railway Mileage in the United States.
(From Statistical Report of the Interstate Commerce Commission.)
MILEAGE ON JUNE 30, 1905.

MILEAGE ON JUNE 30, 1905. STATE OR TERRITORY.

Total

STATE OR TERRITORY.
Official. Unofficial.

Total
Mileage.

Official. Unofficial.

Mileage. Alabama....... 4,776.06 77.46 4,853,52 New Jersey

2,223.70 50.50 2,274.20 Alaska (See foot note)

New Mexico...

2,533.73

2,533,73 Arizona.... 1,820.85 25.00 1.845.85 New York,

8,336.30

8,336.30 Arkansas. 4,183.49 46.12 4,229.61 North Carolina...

4,210.04 46.00 4,256.04 California.

6,477.461
29.74 6,507.20 North Dakota..

3,233.38

3,233.38 Colorado..

5,027.17
5,027.17 Ohio....

9,259.22 10.00

9,269.22 Connecticut.

1,017.72
1,017.72 Oklahoma...

2,624.73

2,624.73 Delaware.

334.72
334.72 Oregon..

1,812.79

1,812.79 District of Columbia... 31.10 .80 31.90 Pennsylvania.

11,043.28 112.56 11,155.84 Florida... 3,580.78 39.00 3,628.78 Rhode Island...

211.89

211.89 Georgia. 6,442.37 70.25 6,512.62 South Carolina

3,159.87 20.00 3,179.87 Idaho........

1,465.43
1,465.43 South Dakota..

3,067.24

3,067.24 Illinois... 11,829.73 2.60 11,832.33 Tennessee..

3,560.75 15.00 3,575.75 Indiana....

6,915.11
13.41 6,928.52 Texas.....

11,983.11 64.56 12,047.67 Indian Territory.

2,638.47
2.638.47 Utah..

1,773.50 31.50 1,805.00 Iowa.....

9,870.66
22.53 9,893.19 Vermont.

1,057.84

5.00 1,062.84 Kansas

8,840.98
8,840.98 Virginia...

3,950.07 21.70 3,971.77 Kentucky 3,286.14 48.75 3,334.89 Washington.

3,367.04 21.21 3,388.25 Louisiana. 4,011.41 125.00 4,136.41 West Virginia.

2,929.06

58.61 2,987.67 Maine......

2,027.86
2,027.86 Wisconsin.

7,211.33

7,211.33 Maryland. 1,434.40 6.70 1,441.10 Wyoming...

1,247.40

1,247.40 Massachusetts.

2,119.40

2,119.40 Michigan..

8,789.28 4.60 8,793.88 Grand total in U.S. 1905 217,017,68 1,083.36 218,101.04 Minnesota.

7,992.09 72,00 8,064.09 Grand total in U.S. 1904 212,577.57 1,326.77 213,904.34 Mississippi.

3,672.24 36,00 3,708.24 Grand totalin U.S. 1903) 207,186.84 790.38 207,977.22 Missouri.

8,038.68 6.76 8,045.44 Grand total in U. S. 1902 201,672.83 799.02.202,471.85 Montana...

3,308.70

3,308.70 Grand total in U.S. 1901 196,075.07 1,162.37 297,237.44 Nebraska...

5,832.89

5,832.89 Grand total in U.S. 1900 192,940.67 405.11 193,345.78 Nevada...

1,180.49

1,180.49 Grand total in U.S. 1899 188,277.49 1,017.17 189,294.66 New Hampshire.. 1,266.73

1,266.73 Grand total in U. S. 1898) 185,370.771 1,025.55 186,396.37 * Excludes 61.79 miles in Alaska.

NUMBER OF STOCKHOLDERS IN PRINCIPAL RAILWAY COMPANIES. The Interstate Commerce Commission, in response to an order by the Senate, compiled in 1905, the first official statement showing the number of stockholders in each railway company reporting to the Commission. The number of companies was 1,220 and the aggregate of their stockholders on record was 27,851. Among the companies showing more than 1,000 stockholders were these: Pennsylvania

44,175 Denver & Rio Grande .2,910 Cin., Hamilton & Dayton.1,558 A., T. & S. F

17,523 Pitts., Ft. Wayne & Chi.....2,642 St. Louis & San Francisco..1,521 Union Pacific.

... 14,256
Morris & Essex.

2,450 Hocking Valley... .1,503 N. Y. Central

11,782 N. Y., Ont. & Western....2,437 Missouri, Kansas & Texas... 1,509 N. Y. N. H. & Hartford 10,842 Southern Pacific..

2,424 Chesapeake & Ohio.. 1,478 Southern Railway

9,572 Concord & Montreal 2,356 Vermont & Massachusetts,1,313 Illinois Central.

9,123
Boston & Lowell

2,168 Northern Central... .1,199 Boston & Albany

8,417 Northern Railroad, 2,068 North Pennsylvania. .1,100 Boston & Maine

7,402 Cleveland & Pittsburgh. 2,041 Rome, Wat. & Ogd.. 1,094 Baltimore & Ohio 7,132 Chicago & Alton...

2,039 Huntingdon & Bd. Top .1,072 Chicago Great Western.. 5,949 Pere Marquette

.1,984 N. Y., L. & Western. .1,070 C., M. & St. Paul 5,832 C., C., C. & St. L.. 1,965 Rutland.

.1,068 Lehigh Valley. 5,777 Mine Hill & Schuylkill H.,1.974 Little Miami

.1,064 old Colony 5,371 Wabash.

1,974 Chi., St. P., M. & O. .1,045 Erie...: 4,309 Missouri Pacific.

1,861 Utica, C. & S. Ry........ .1,042 Chicago & Northwestern. 4,109 Louisville & Nashville. 1,672 Georgia R, R.

.1,038 Delaware & Hudson 3,819 Boston & Providence. 1,654

P., G.&N....

.1,035 United New Jersey 3.585 Lackawanna

..1,575 Wheeling & Jake Erie.....1,004 Norfolk & Western

.... 2,911 Among important companies reporting less than 1,000 holders are the Atlantic Coast Line, 883; Mobile and Ohio, 798; Maine Central, 779; Lake Shore and Michigan Southern, 603; Central Ver. mont, 631; Michigan Central, 508.

Che Inter-Continental Railway. The project of a railway connecting New York and Buenos Ayres was the subject of reports made by special committees to the Pan-American Conferences at the City of Mexico in 1902, and Rio de Janeiro in 1906. The scheme embraces an iron road connecting with the existing United States systems through Mexico into Central America, and down the side of the Andes into the Argentine Republic. It will thus traverse Mexico, and the Central American States, Panama, Colonibia, Ecuador, Bolivia, Peru, Chile, and Argentina, with numerous radiations running to the sea coasts and connecting with Venezuela, Guiana, Brazil, ar Uruguay.

The committee which prepared the report submitted at the Rio de Janeiro Conference in 1906, was uuthorized by the Conference in the City of Mexico, and was composed in 1906 of Henry G. Davis, of West Virginia, Chairman; Andre tv Carnegie, J. D. Cassasus, Ambassador of Vexico to the United States; Charles M. Pepper, and A. Lazo- Arriaga, Most of the report of the committee was based on the investigations of Mr. Pepper, who, as special commissioner, spent a year coing ver the surveys in South America. While much has already been done, that

which remains presents difficulties, involving principally the ability of some of the countries to construct railways at this time.

LENGTH OF THE LINE. The distance from New York to Buenos Ayres along the line of the proposed Pan-American Railway is 10, 400 miles. According to the report there are not more than 3.700 miles of inter-continenta? haiiway not specifically provided for. On the point of cost the report said:

"'The committee under whose direction the inter-continental surveys were made, and of which A: J. Cassatt was chairman, approximated the cost at about $32,000 a mile; but, allowing the largest estimate for railway coustruction, which is $50,000 per mile. this would mean that the expenditure of $185,000,000 would insure the completion of all these sections. This certainly is not beyond the resources of the twelve or fifteen republics which are interested, and which could give substantial aid by large concessions of land and the granting of credit.”

In the course of the report, it is said: 'It is noteworthy that the feasibility of a through intercontinental railway line has received the endorsement of leading capitalists representing many forms of investment, such as Andrew Carnegie; President Cassatt of the Pennsylvania system, and Thomas F. Ryan." Mr. Carnegie, the report stated, had suggested that the United States Government give $100,000,000 to the project if the other countries interested pledge themselves to an equal sum. The investigations of cost indicate that all remaining gaps could be closed by the sum which would be obtained in this manner.

THE MEXICAN SECTION. After leaving the borders of the United States, probably at El Paso, the first section of the InterContinental Railway would cross Mexico, from north to south. Follo"the existing road runs south

out the building policy of President Diaz, much of this section is already completed. ihrough the City of Mexico to the

Isthmus of Tehuantepec and thence on to a point only about 12 miles from the Guatemalan border. The Mexican Government has had before it for years this project of building a line of railway connecting its northern and southern borders. The final steps m this policy were the construction of the Vera Cruz and Pacific, the Tehuantepec National, and the road known as the Pan-American. The line across the Isthmus of Tehuantepec, from the Gulf to the Pacific, has been nearly completed and will be opened early

in 1907 for actual traffic,

With the completion of certain lines in Mexico within a year the committee thought that there will be through railway communication between Guatemala and New York City, a distance of 3,770 miles.

Guatema is the next country through which the Inter-Continental will pass. For some years the Guatemala system of railways reached to a point within twenty-eight or thirty miles of the Mexican border. It has not been deemed advisable nor necessary to finish the small gap until the Mexican lines are ready to meet it. Now that Mexico pushed its railroad down so far, the work in Guatemala will soon be taken up, the connection made in accordance with some one of the various Guatemala railway projects, and then there will be a throngh line from New York City to Guatemala City Guatemala is completing an important interoceanic line which will connect Guatemala City, the capital of the country, with Puerto Barrios on the Atlantic and with San Jose on the Pacific.

Salvador and Honduras come next, but neither of these countries has progressed far in railway construction. Nearly all of the other governments furnished the committee with detailed reports, but with regard to Salvador and Honduras it is known only that the further construction of railways in those countries, which would fill in an important gap, is delayed until the extension of the Guatemalan system on the north and that of Nicaragua on the south. When this has been done Salvador and Honduras will do their share.

NICARAGUA AND COSTA RICA, In Nicaragua the government has given concessions for the construction of a line between Managua and Matagalp, and work on the surveys had already begun. This is an important linkin the long chain as the line goes to Honduras, where it will meet that coming down from Mexico through Guatemala,

Since the Pan-American Conference in 1902 Costa Rica, the next country through which the InterContinental will travel, has constructed 142 miles of railroad, making a total in the entire country of 364 miles. There are now under contemplation plans for the further construction of railways, which will be of immense importance to the Inter-Continental project.

In Panama, plans of railroad construction are under consideration. There is a possibility that a road will be projected from Bocas del Toro, where the Costa Rican line will find its end. There is no project whatever for a line southeast from Panama, but the report expressed the opinion that, because of the big hardwood forests and the mineral resources of the country, it will not be many years before there will be a line leading from the canal zone to the southeast.

IN SOUTH AMERICA Passing from Central America, the Inter-Colonial continues on its way into the Continent to the south, Following a line traversing regions of unknown wealth, it will pass through Colombia, Ecuador, Peru, Bolivia, and then into the Argentine Republic. The project does not confine itself to the construction of this main trunk line, but takes into consideration the development of the rail way interests in countries not in the line of the road. The possibilities in Chile. Uruguay, Brazil, Paraguay, and Venezuela, were discussed in the report, together with wbat has been done and wbat the varions countries expect to do. Every mlie of road that is built in Soutb America affects the vatne of the project.

It is understood that the Central and South American republics which will be traversea hy the railway will each own the lines within its territory, but the actual running of the road will be directed by a central body.

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