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TELEGRAPH RATES— Continuel.

TELEGRAPH RATES TO FOREIGN COUNTRIES. These rates are from New York City. The address and signature are included in the chargeable matter, and the length of words is limited to fifteen letters. When a word is composed of more than fifteen letters, every additional fifteen or the fraction of fifteen letters will be counted as a word. Per Word. Per Word. Per Word.

Per Word. Abyssinia.. $. SO Denmark.

$0.35 Martinique. $1.00 Russia (Asia). Algeria. 0.32 Ecuador. 1.25 Matanzas..

20 Santo Domingo. 1.32 Alexandria (Egypt) .50 England. 25 Melbourne, Vic, 0.66 Scotland

25 Antigua .81 France .25 Mexico City,$1.75,10 wds. Servia,

34 Argentine Repub.. 1.00 Germany. 25 Nassau (Bahamas). .35 Sicily

31 Austria. .32 Gibraltar.. .43 Natal (So. Africa).. .86 Siam

1. 05 Barbados.. .91 Greece. .36 New South Wales.. 66 Singapore

1.11 Belgium 25 Guatemala. .55 New Zealand 66 Spain

38 Bermuda. 42 Havana 15 Noi way 35 St. Thomas

.96 • Bolivia 1. 25 Hayti..... 1.05 to 1.55 Orange River Col’y. 86 Sweden

38 Brazil. .85 to 1.60 Holland.

25 Panama
97 Switzerland

30 Bulgaria. .35 Honolulu. :47 Paraguay

1.00 Sydney (N. S. W.). 66 Burmah 74 Hungary .32 Penang. 1.11 Tangier

45 Callao (Peru).. 1.25 Iceland

.42 Peru...
1.25 Tasmania

66 Cairo (Egypt). .50 India. 74 Philippine Is. (Lu- Transvaal

86 Cape Colony(S.Af.) 86 Ireland .25 zon, Manilla, etc.) 1.12 Trinidad

98 Ceylon..... 76 Italy

Other islands..... 1.27 Turkey (Europe). .37 Chile. 1.25 Jamaica 48 Porto Rico 75 Turkey (Asia)

45 China.. 1.22 Japan 1.33 Portugal

.39 Uruguay

1.00 Cochin China.... 1. 19 Java.

1.20 Queensland

.66 Venezuela ..1.50 to 1.60 Colon... .97 Korea (Seoul). 1.33 Roumania

.34 Vera Cruz, $1.75, 10 wds. Cyprus.. .50 Malta....

.35 Russia (Europe).... .43 Victoria (Aus.)..... Demerara.... 1. 44

TELEGRAPH STATISTICS.

THE WESTERN UNION TELEGRAPH COMPANY. Statement exhibiting the mileage of lines operated, number of offices, number of messages sent, receipts, expenses, and profits for 1870, 1875, and 1880, and each year from 1893 to 1906, inclusive:

Miles of Poles Miles of
YKAR.

Offices.
and Cables. Wire.
Messages. Receipts.

Profits.

Expenses. 1870. 54,103 112,191 3,972

9,157,646 $7,138,737.96 $4,910,772.42 $2,227,965.54 1875. 72,833 179,496

6,565 17,153,710 9,564,574.60 6,335,414.77 3,229,157.83 1880 83,645 233,334

9077

29,215,509 12,782,894.53 6,948,956.74 5,833,937.79 1890. 183,917 678,997

19,382

55,878.762 22,387,028.91 15,074,303.81 7,312,725.10 1893.

189,936 769,201 21,078 66,591,858 24.978,442.96 17 482,405.68 7,496,037.28 1894.

190,303 790,792 21,166 58,632,237 21,852,655.09 16,060,170.21 5,792 484.88 1895

189,714 802,651 21,360 58,307,315 22,218,019.18 16,076,629.97 6,141,389.21 1895

189 918 826,929 21,725 58,760,444 22,612,730.28 16,714,756.10 5,897,980.18 1897.

190,614 841,002 21,769 58,151,6 22,638,859.16 16,906,656.03 5,732,203.13 1898

189,847 874,420 22,210 63,173,749 23,915,732.78 17,825,581.52 6,090,151.26 1899.

189,856 904,633 22,285 61,398,157 23,954,312.05 18,085,579.19 5,868,732.86 1900

192,705 933,153 22,900 63,167,783 24,758,569.55 18,593,205.87 6,165,363.68 1901 193,589 972,766

65,657,019 26,354,150.85 19,668,902.68 6,685,248.17 1902.

196,115 1,029,984 23,567 69,374,883 28,073,095.10 20.780,766.21 7.292,328.89 1903.

196,517 1,089,212 23,120 *69,790,866 29, 167,686.80 20 953,217.07 8,214,471.73 1904

199.850 1,155,405 23,468 *67,909,973 29,249,390.44 21 361,915.46 7,887,474.98 1905

200.224 1,184,557 23.815 *67,477,320 29,033,635.04 21,845.570.32 7,188,064.72 1906.

202,959 1,256,147 24,323 *71,487,082 30,675,655.00 23,605,072.00 7,070,583,60 * Not including messages sent over teased wires or under railroad contracts.

The average toll per message in 1868 was 104.7: in 1889 was 31.2; in 1890 was 32.4; in 1891 was 32.5; in 1892 was 31.6; in 1893 was 31.2; in 1894 was 30.5; in 1895 was 30.7; in 1896 was 30.9; in 1897 was 30.5; in 1898 was 30.1; in 1899 was 30.8; in 1900 was 30.8; in 1901 was 30.9; in 1902 was 31.0; in 1903 was 31.4; in 1904 was 31.7; in 1905 was 31.6; in 1906 was 31.6. The average cost per message to the company in 1868 was 63.4; in 1889 was 22.4; in 1890 was 22.7; in 1891 was 23.2; in 1892 was 22.3; in 1893 was 22.7; in 1894 was 23.3; in 1895 was 23.3; in 1896 was 24.0: in 1897 was 24.3; in 1898 was 24.7: in 1899 was 25.1; in 1900 was 25.1; in 1901 was 25.1; in 1902 was 25.7; in 1903 was 25.6; in 1904 was 26.1; in 1905 was 27.3: in 1906 was 27.6.

The Postal Telegraph Cable Company also transacts business over a portion of the United States, and in 1905 had 53,476 miles of poles, 306,207 miles of wire, and 22,000 offices.

[graphic]

23,238

GROWTH OF THE TELEGRAPH SERVICE IN THE WORLD. Number of messages, 1870: Norway. 466,700; Sweden, 590,300; Denmark, 513,623; Germany, 8,207,800; Netherlands, 1,837,800; Belgium, 1,998,800; France, 5,663,800; Switzerland, 1,629,235; Spain, 1,050,000; Italy, 2.189.000; Austria, 3,388,249; Hungary, 1,489,000; 'United States, 9,157,646; Great Britain and Ireland, 9,650,000.

Number of messages, 1904-05: Norway, 2.303,025; Sweden, 2,885,625; Denmark, 2,406,193; Germany, 47.576,600; Netherlands. 5,807,951; Belgium, 15,585,354; France. 50,419,776; Switzerland, 4,245,844; Spain, 4,843,289 : Italy, 12,142,617: Austria, 16,463,654: Hungary, 17,109,383, Russia, 118,135,818; United States (1906), 71,487,082; Great Britain and Ireland, 88,959,000; Japan, 21,036,955; Australia, 11,311,265: New Zealand, 5,159,745; Argentine Republic, 2,121,543: India, 7,307,087; Mexico, 3,383,518; Canada, 5,963,247; Turkey, 5 129,862: Bulgaria, 1,248,411 ; Egypt, 1,824.622 Roumania, 2,575,270; Cape Colony, 3.328,287; Portngal, 4,595,360, Brazil, 1,481,068; Chile. 4,603,628: Greece, 1,304,573; Servia, 1,301,320: Guatemala, 1,106,822; 'Uruguay, 223,283: Colombia, 1,388,388; Persia, 152,837: Peru, 152,808; Paraguay, 97,044.

Messages, per capita: New Zealand, 5.05; Australia. 2.39 : Belgium, 2.15: Great Britain and Ireland, 2.15: France, 1.25: Switzerland, 1.19; United States, 1.08; Netherlands, 1.04; Norway, 1.01; Germany, 0.68; Italy, 0.24; Spain, 0.28.

Telephone Statistics. The following are the latest statistics made public hy the American (Bell) Telephone Company. (See article on Electrical Progress in 1903" in reference to other telephone companies.) The igures are for January 1 of each year:

4,632

1904. 1905. 1906.

1904.

1905. 1906. Exchanges and

1,609

Miles of wire submarine. 6 358 6,671 9,373 4,080 2,131

Total miles of wire. 2,983,189 3,549,8104,778.282 Miles wire poles and

Total circuits....

798,901 930,251 1,135,449 Buildings.

1,358,140 1.
1,654,379 2,183,167
Total employés..

53.795 59,451 74,718 Miles underground.... 1,618,691 1,888,760 2,585,742 Total stations..

1,526,167 1,799,633 2,241 367 The number of instruments in the hands of licensees under rental at the beginning of 1906 was 5,698.258. The number of exchange connections daily in the United States is 13,543, 168. ora total per year of over 4.360,996,000 The average number of daily calls per subscriber is six. The capital of the company is $158,661,800.

There are several thousand independent telephone companies whose estimated aggregate number of instruments is over 5,000,000. Independents operate 228,000 telephones in Ohio, and 175,009 in Indiana; statistics are scattered and indefinite. Consolidation of independent interests is going on and an International Indepeudeut Telephone Association has been orgauized.

Telephone messages per annum (latest reports): France, 203,084,217; Germany, 1,069,070,462; Great Britain and [reland, 723,216,353; U tel State, 4,3 0,996,000: Austria, 135,618,349; Deim:ưrk, 97 545.60); Hungary, 62,810,543; Belgium, 47,010,611; Switzerland, 33,510,519; Netherlands, 31,470,096. Iu Italy and Spain the use of the telephoue is very limited.

Canals. STATEMENT showing the cost and date of construction, length, number of locks, and navigable depth of the principal canals of the United States used for commercial purposes.

Cost of

When Len’h No. of Depth
CANALS.

Construc- Com-
miles. Locks. feet.

Location.
tion. pleted
Albemarle and Chesapeake. $1,641,363 1850 14

1 7% Norfolk, Va., to Currituek Sound, N. C. Augusta

1,500,000 1817 9

11 Savannah River, Gil, t) Augusta, Ga. Black River.

3,681,954 1819 35 109 4 Rome, N. Y., to Lyons Falls, N. Y. Caragiu and Seneca....

2,232,6:2 1839 25

11 7 Montezuma, N. Y., to Cayug: and Seneca Lakes, N. Y. Champlain ...

4,011,000 1822 81

32 6 Whitehall, N. Y., to West Troy, N. Y. Chesapeake and Delaware. 3,730,2301 1999 14

3 9 Chesapeake City, M., to Delaware City, Del. Chesapeake and Ohio.

11, 2:0,27 1850 184 73 6 Cumberland, Md., to Washington, D. C. Companys...

90,000 1847 22

1 6 Mississippi River, La., to Bayou Black, La. Delware and Rauritan. 4,888,749 188 66

7 New Brunswick, N. J., to Trenton, N. J. Dels ware Division.,

2, 133, 350 1830 60

33 6 Easton, Ps., to Bristol, Pa. Des Moines Rapids.

4.582 009 1877 7% 3 5 At Des Moines Rapids, Mississippi River. Dismal Swamp.

2,800,000 1822 22

7 6 Connects Chesa peake Bay with Albemarle Sound.

52,510,800 1826 387 72 7 Albany, N. Y., to Buffalo, N. Y. Fairfield

4% None. Alligator River to Lake Matuimuskeet, N. C. Galveston and Brazos.

310,000 1851 38

3% Galveston, Tex., to Brazos River, Tex. Hocking

975, 181 1813 42 26 4 Carroll, o., to Nelsonville, 0. Illinois and Michigan.

7,357187 1848 1 2 15 6 Chicago, nl., to La Salle, Ill. Illinois and M - issippi..

7,250,00 1895 75

3 7 Around lower rapids of Rock Riv.,III. Connects with Miss. R. Lehigh Coal and Navigation Co. 4,155,000 1821 108 57

Coalport, Pa., to Easton, Pa. Louisville and Portland..

5,578.631 1879

2

At Falls of Ohio Riser, Louisville, Ky. Miami and Erie...

8,0 2,80 1835 274 93 5% Cncinnati, O., to Toledo, O. Morris.. 6,000,000 1836 103

5 E: ston, Pa., to Jersey City, N. J. Muscle Shoals and Elk R. Shosis. 3,156,919 1899 16

11 6

Big Muscle Shoals, Tenn., to Elk River Shoals, Tenn. New berne and Beaufort

3 None.

Clubfoot Creek to Harlow Creek, N. C. Ogeechee

40°,810 1810 16

5 3

Savannah River, Ga., to Ogeechee River, Ga. Ohio

4,695,201 1815 317 150 4 Cleveland, O., to Portsmouth, 0. Oswego.

5,239,520 1828 38

13 7 Oswego, N. Y., to Syracuse, N. Y. Pennsylvania.

7,731,150 1839 193 71 6 Columbia, Northumberland, Wilkes-Barre, Hunting ion, Pa. Portnge Lake and Lake Super'r. 528,892 183

None. 15 From Keweenaw Bay to Like Superior. Port Arthur..

1899 7

26 Port Arthur, Tex., to fiulf of Mexico. Santa Fe

70.000 1880 10

5 Waldo, Fla., to Melrose, Fla. Sault Ste. Marie (ship canal).. 4,000,000 1895 3

2 18 Connects Lakes Superior and Huron at St. Mary's River. Schuylkill Navigation Company 12,461,600 1826 108

6% Mill Creek, Pa., to Philadelphia, P:1. Sturgeon B:v and Lake Michii 99.61 1881 144 None 15 Between Green Bay and Lake Michigan. St. Mary's l'alls..

7,909,667 1896

1 21 Connects Lakes Superior and Huron at Sault Ste. Marie, Mich. Suspehanna and Tidewater ... 4,9:1,45 1810 45

32 5% Colunbia, Pa., to Havre de Grace, Md. Walhond ng

602,259 1813 25

11 1 Rochester, O., to Riscoe, O. Wellan' (ship canal).

23, 7:6 353

55

Connets Like Ontario and Lake Erie. *And improvements. + Nitvigable depth.

The Ha:lem River Ship Canal, connecting the Hudson River and Long Island Sound, by way of Spuyten Duyvil Creek and Harlem River, Wils opened for trautic on June 17, 1895, and cost about $2,700.000.

[graphic]

Regulation of Railroad Rates. The following are the clauses of the act approved Jule 29, 1908, to amend the act of 1887 and to the construction of switches, filing of schedules of rates and fares, prohibition of discriminations and rebates and hearing of complaints and remedial action thereou by the Interstate Commerce Commission.

FURNISHING SWITCHES AND TRANSPORTATION. Any common carrier subject to the provisious of this act, upon application of any lateral, branch line of railroad, or of any shipper tendering interstate traffic for transportation, shall construct, maintain, and operate npon reasonable terms a switch conuection with any such lateral, branch line of railroad, or private sio track which may be constr cted to connect with its railroad, where such connection is reasonably practicable and can be put in with safety and will furnish sufficient business to justify the construction and maintenance of the same; and shall furnish cars for the movement of such trainc to the best of its ability, without discrimination in favor of or against any such shipper.

FILING OF SCHEDULES OF RATES. Every common carrier subject to the provisions of this act shall file with the commission created by this act and print and keep open to public inspection schedules showing all the rates, fares and charges for transportation between different points on its own route and between points on its own route and points on the route of any carrier by railroa i, by pipe line, or by water when a through route and joint rate have been established. If no joint rate over the through route has been estahlish cd, the several carriers in such through route shall file, print and keep open to public inspection as aforesaid, the separately established rates, fares and charges applied to the through transportation. The schedules printed as aforesaid by any such common carrier shall plainly state the places between which property and passengers will be carried, and shall contain the classification of freight in force, and shall also state separately all terminal charges, storage charges, icing charges, and all other charges which the commission may require, all privileges or facilities granted or allowed, and any rules or regulations which in anywise change, aftect, or determine any part of the aggregate of such aforesaid rates, fares and charges, or the value of the service rendered io the passenger, shipper, or cousiguee.

DISCRIMINATION FORBIDDEN. No carrier, unless otherwise provided by this act, shall engage or participate in the transportation of passengers or property, as defined in this act, unless the rates, fa res, and charges upon which the same are transported by said carrier have been filed and published in accordance with the provisions of this act; nor shall any carrier charge or demand or collect or receive a greater or less or different compensation for such transportation of passengers or property, or forany service in connection herewithi, between the poinis named in such tariffs than the rates, fares, and charges which are specified in the taritf filed and in effect at the time; nor shall any carrier refund or remit in any manner or by any device any portion of the rates, fares, and charges so specified, nor extend to any shipper or person any privileges or facilities in the transportation of passengers or property, except such as are specified in such tariffs.

REBATES. Any person, corporation, or company who shall deliver property for interstate transportation to any cominon carrier, subject to the provisions of this act, or for whom as consignor or consignee, any such carrier shall transport property from one State, Territory, or the District of Columbia to any other State, Territory, 'or the District of Columbia or foreign country, who shall knowingly by employó, agent, officer, or otherwise, directly or indirectly, by or throngh any means or device whatsoever, receive or accept from such common carrier any sum of money or any other valuable consideration as a rebate or offset against the regular charges for transportation of such property, as fixed by the schedules of rate provided for in this act, shall in addition to any penalty provided by this act forfeit to the United States a sum of money three times the amount of money so received or accepted, and three times the value of any other consideration so received or accepted, to be ascertained by the trial court; and the Attorney-General of the United States is authorized and directed, whenever he has reasonable grounds to believe that any such person, corporation, or company has knowingly received or accepted from any such common carrier any sum of money or other valuable consideration as a rebate or offset as aforesaid, to institute in any court of the United States of competent jurisdiction, a civil action to collect the said sum or sums so forfeited as aforesaid; and in the trial of said action all such rebates or other considerations so received or accepted for a period of six years prior to the commencement of the action, may be included therein, and the amount recovered shall be three times the total amount of money, or three times the total value of such consideration, so received or accepted, or both, as the case may be.

HEARING OF COMPLAINTS. The commission is authorized and empowered, and it shall be its duty, whenever, after full hearing upon a complaint made as provided in section thirteen of this act, or upon complaint of any common carrier, it shall be of the opinion that any of the rates, or charges whatsoever, demanded, charged, or collected ny common carrier or carriers, subject to the provisions of this act, for the transportation of persons or property, as defined in the first section of this act, or that any regulations or practices whatsoever of such carrier or carriers affecting such rates, are unjust and unreasonable, or unjustly discriminatory, or unduly preferential or prejudicial, or otherwise in violation of any of the provisions of this act, to determine and prescribe what will be the just and reasonable rate or rates, charge or charges, to be thereafter observed in such case as the maximum to be charged ; and what regulation or practice in respect to such transportation is just, fair, and reasonable to be thereafter followed ; and to make an order that the c rrier shall cease and desist from such violation, to the extent to which the commission find the same to exist, and shall not thereafter publish, demand, or collect any rate or charge for such transportation in excess of the maximum rate or charge so prescribed. All shall couforin to the regulation or pratice so prescribed.

ESTABLISHMENT OF ROUTES AND RATES. The commission may also, after hearing on a complaint, establish through routes and joint rates as the maximum to he charged, and prescribe the division of such rates as hereinbefore provided, and the terms and conditions under which such through routes shall be operated, when that may be necessary to give effect to any provision of this act, and the carriers complained of have refused or neglected to voluntarily establish such through routes and joint rates, provided no reasonable or satisfactory through route exists, and this provision shall apply when one of the connecting carriers is a water line,

Railroad Statistics. MILEAGE, ASSETS, LIABILITIES, EARNINGS, EXPENDITURES, AND TRAFFIC OF SUR

FACE STEAM RAILROADS IN THE UNITED STATES. This table was compiled from "Poor's Manual of Railroads of the United States for 1906."

Mileage of Railroads....

212,624.18 Miles of Railroad Operated........ 215,506.92 Second Tracks and Sidings..

88,707.57
Passenger Train Mileage.......

467,270,447 Freight

559,434,683 Total Track

301,331. 75
Mixed

26,715,494 Steel Rails in Track.

290,529.24 Iron Rails in Track.

10, 802.51
Total

1,053, 420, 624 Locomotives... 449,616 Passengers Carried....

745,446,641 Cars, Passenger..

30,777
Passenger Mileage..

23,906, 420, 668 Baggage, Mail, etc.... 10,552 Tons of Freight Moved...

1,435,321,748 Freight 1,757, 105 Freight Mileage...

187,375, 621,537

Traffic Earnings. Total Cars 1,798,434 Passengers

$486,420,902 Freight

1,478, 167, 246 Liabilities. Miscellaneous..

147, 609, 622 Capital Stock..

$6,741,956,825
Total Traffic Revenue..

$2,112,197,770 Bonded Debts

7,821, 243, 106 Unfunded Debt...

201,978, 773
Net Earnings.

$685, 464,488 Current Accounts.... 620, 7:20. 096 Receipts from other sources......

80,927, 659 Sinking and Other Funds...

182,8 3,229

Total Available Revenue......... $766,392,147 Total Liabilities......... $15,568,752, 029

Payments.
Interest on Bonds.............

$247,155,897 Other Interest.

12,956,346 Assets. Dividends on Stock.....

193,753, 869 Cost of Railroad and Equipment. $12. 143, 997,551 Miscellaneous...

59,856,679 Other Investments. 2,935, 276,877 Rentals-Interest.....

31,716,773 Sundry Assets

367, 454,847
Dividends.

22, 314,069 Current Accounts......

772,844,570
Miscellaneous..

22, 208.880 Taxes.....

54,553, 620 Total Assets

$16, 219,573,845
Total Payments..

$644,516,133 Excess of Assets over Liabilities....

$650,821,816 Surplus.................................... $121,876,014 $Including, in 1905 and 1904, real estate mortgages, equipment trust obligations, etc., previously included in item "unfunded debt.' COMPARATIVE STATISTICS OF RAILROADS IN THE UNITED STATES, 1895-1905.

Miles
YEAR.
Capital Stock,

Bonded Debt. Gross Earnings. Net Earnings. Interest Paid. Dividends Paid. Operated 1895. 179, 887 5, 231,373,852 $5,712,052,517 $1,105, 284, 267 $327,505,716 $242,943,243 $83,175,774 1896.180,891 5.290.730.567 5,426,074,969 1,125,632.025 332 333, 756 242, 415,494 81,364,854 1897 181, 133 5,453.782.046 5.411.058,525 1.132.866.626 338.170.195 231,046,819 82,630,989 1898. 184.194 5.581.522.858 5.635.363 594 1.249,558.724 389, 666,474 237,133,099 94.937,526 1899.186,280 5.742,181,181 5,644.858.027 1.336,096,379 423, 941, 689 239, 178,913109,032,252 1900. 191,511 5,804,346, 250 5,758, 592.764 1,501, 695.378 483, 247,526 244, 447,806 140,343,653 1901. 195,886 5.978, 796. 249 6.035.469, 741 1.612,448,826 520.294.727 261, 645,714 156,887 283 1902. 197,381 6,078,290.596 6,465, 290,839 2,720,814.900 560.026.277 263, 237,451178,200.752 1903. 206,876 6,355, 207,335 6,722, 216,517 1.908,857,826 592,508.512 278,101,828 190,674,415 1904.211,074 6,477,045.374 7.475,840,203 1,977, 688.713 639, 240,027 275, 800,200 211,522,166 1905. 212,6:24 6,741,956.825 7,821,243, 106 2112,197,7701 685,464,488 270,315,290 203,675,622

SUMMARY OF RAILWAY MILEAGE IN THE UNITED STATES.

(From Statistical Report of the Interstate Commerce Commission.)

[blocks in formation]

1905
1217, 017.68 1,083.36 1218, 101.04 4.196.70 *7.34

+26, 44 1904 212, 577.57 1,326.77 213.904, 34 5,927. 12

7.20

26. 34 1903 207, 186.84 790,38 207.977.22 5,505, 37

7.00

26. 03 1902 201,672.83 799.02 202,471.85 5,234.41

6.82

25.76 1901 196.075.07 1,162.37 197.237.44

3,891. 66
6. 64

25.52 to 1900 192, 940.67 405.11 193, 345.78 4,051.12

6.51

25. 44 1899 188, 277.49 1,017.17 189, 294. 66 2,898, 34

6.37

25, 34 1898 185, 370.77 1,025. 55 186, 396.32 1.967. 85

6. 28

25.400 1897 182, 919.82 1,508. 65 184, 428.47 1,651.84 6.21

25.59 * On basis of 2,970,038 square miles, which covers and surface” oniy, and excludes Alaska.

+ On basis of 82 494.575 population for 1905, which is reached by adding to population of the United States in 1900 75,994,575 (which excludes Alaska and persons in the military and naval service stationed abroad), an estimated annual increase of 1,300,000 for each successive year.

$ Excludes 61.79 miles in Alaska

Principal Railroad Systems of United States and Canada

WITH A SYNOPSIS OF LAST ANNUAL REPORT OF INCOME AND EXPENDITURE AS

SUBMITTED TO "THE WORLD ALMANAC" BY THE RAILROAD COMPANIES.

SYSTEMS, LOCATION, AND Divisions, Mileage, and Operating
FINANCIAL DATA.

General Officers.

Express.
Atchison, Topeka and
Santa Fe Ry. System.

- Santa Fe."
[Illinois, Iowa, Missouri,

President, E. P. Ripley, Chicago, Kansas, Nebraska, Colo- Atchison, Topeka and Santa Fé Ry.,

IlI.; Vice-Presidents, J, W. Ken6,908.98 n.; Gulf, Colorado and rado, Texas, New Mexico,

drick, G. T. Nicholson and W.B. Santa Fé Ry., 1,473,46 m.; Southern Arizona, California, OklaKansas Ry. of Texas, 129.17 m.;

Jansen, Chicago, Ill. ; General homa. )

Manager, J. E. Hurley, Topeka, Grand Canyon Ry., 66.89 m.; Santa For year ending June 30, 1906. Total earnings..

Kan.; Secretary, E. L. Copeland, .$78,044,347

Fé, Prescoit & Phoenix Ry., 412.89 Topeka, Kan. ; Assistant Secre

m.; Pecos System, 370.24 m.; S.F.& Operating expenses 51,035,356 N.W. Ry., 53.62 m. Total mileage,

tary, L. C. Deming, New York.

General Offices, Chicago, Ill., and Netearnings.. -$27,008,992 9,415.25. Other income..... 1,346,401 EXPRESS CO.-Wells, Fargo & Co.

Topeka, Kan.; New York Offices,

5 Nassau St., 377 Broadway.
Total net income.$28,355,393
Total payments...... 25,128,079
Surplus..

$3,227,314

First Div. Districts: Richmond, 130.65

m.; Norfolk, 289.18 m.; WilmingAtlantic Coast LineR.R. ton, 512.35 m.; Charleston, 314.59 m.; (Virginia, North Carolina, Columbia, 437.46 m.; Fayetteville, President, T. M. Emerson; 1st

South Carolina, Georgia, 212.13 m. Total mileage, first divi- Vice-President, Alex. Hamilton, Florida, Alabama. ). sion, 1,896.36.

Petersburg, Va. ; 2d Vice-Presi. For year ending June 30, 1906. Second Div. Districts: Savannah, dent, C. S. Gadsden, Charleston, Total earnings.....$24,868,448 230.77 m.; Thomasville, 468.85 m.; S. C. ; 3d Vice-President, J. R. Operating expenses 16,082,329 Montgomery, 348.42 m, Total mile- Kenly: General Manager, w.N. Net earnings... $8,786,119

age, second division, 1,048.04. Royall; Secretary, H. L. Border,

Third Div. Districts: 'Jacksonville, Other income.. 2,565,934

New York. General Offices, Wil503.66 m. Lakeland, 313.86 m.; Total net income. 11,352,053 Gaiuesville, 365.70 m.; Terminals 71, 407, and 1218 Broadway.

mington, N.C.; New York Offices, Total payments.... 9,253,740 at Jacksonville, 9.87 m. Total Surplus..

$2,098,313 mileage, third division, 1,193.09.

Grand total, 4,137.49 m.

EXPRESS Co. --Southern. Baltimore & Ohio R. R. (New Jersey, Pennsylvania,

President, O. G. Murray; 1st ViceDelaware, Maryland, Dis

President, George F. Randolph;2d trict of Columbia, Virginia,

Vice-President, H. L. Bond ; 3d West Vi

Vice-President, G. L. Potter;4th a, Ohio, 11

Vice-President, J. V. McNeal; linois, Indiana, Kentucky, Missouri, ) Lines included in income account,

Secretary, c. W. Woolford ; GenFor year ending June 30, 1906. 4,029.93 m.; affiliated lines, 455.78

eral Manager, T. Fitzgerald ManTotal earnings... $77,392,006 m. Total mileage, 4,486.71.

ager Freight Traffic, Č. S. Wight; Operating expenses 49,515,220 EXPRESS Co.-United States.

Manager Passenger Traffic, D.

B. Martin, General Offices, Bal. Net earnings.. $27,876,836

timore, Md.; New York Offices, Other income... 3,466,371

2 Wall Street, 434 Broadway. Total net income. $31,343,207

General Offices B.' & O. S. W. Total payments.... 22,416,310

Div., Cincinnati, O.; New York

Office, 2 Wall Street. Surplus..

$8,926,897

Bangor and Aroostook Aroostook Junction to Caribou,154.95
Railroad.

m.; Oldtown to Greenville, 76 m.; (Maine.)

Fort Fairfield Junction to Fort For year ending June 30, 1906.

Fairfield, 13.30 m.; Ashland JuncTotal earnings...... $2,496,546

tion to Fort Kent, 94.89 m.; Caribou President, F. W. Cram; ViceOperating expenses 1,544,669 to Van Buren, 33.11 m.; Milo Junc

President, A. A. Burleigh, Houltion to Katahdin Iron Works, 18.95 Net earnings..

ton, Me. General Offices, Bangor, $951,877

m.; Patten Junction to Patten, 5.67 Other income.

Me. 13,179

m.; Caribou to Limestone, 15.72 m.; Total net income.. $965,057 Spurs, 15.86 m.; South Lagrange to Total payments.... 892,126 Searsport, 54.13 m. Total mileage, Surplus......

482.58. $72,931

EXPRESS Co.-American.

Main Line, Boston, Mass., to Albany, Boston and Albany R. R.

N.Y., 200 m.; Ware River Br., 49 m.; The Boston and Albany R. R. is leased

Athol Br., 45 m.; Pittsfield and to the New York Central and Hud(Massachusetts, New York.) Earnings, expenses, etc., peNorth Adams Br., 19 m.; Hudson

son River R. R. ported by New York Central

and Chatham Br., 17 m.; Milford and Hudson River R. R. Br., 12 m.; Webster Br., 11 m.;

Second Vice-President, Edgar Van Lessee, other branches, 39 m. Total mile

Etten. General Offices, Boston,

Mess.
EXPRESS -Adams; Americay

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age, 392.

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