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ILLUSTRATIONS.

Subject.

Painter.

Engraver. Page
CÆSAREA ............. W. H. BARTLETT.C. COUSEN ..... 1
AN ADVOCATE IN HIS STUDY ..... A. OsTADE.. W. H. WORTHINGTON . 31
YÉRÉ BATAN SERAÏ ......... Miss PARDOE ... J.T. WILLMORE . ...
THE LADYE ANNE ................... C. Woods .....
BRIDGE, AND AVALANCHE GALLERY . . W. H. BARTLETT . , J. CoUSEN .....
THE MIDSHIPMAN .......... A. E. CHALLEN, R.A.. 11. ROBINSON . ....
THE CASTLE OF DOUNE. ....... T. ALLAM. ..... J. CARTER , ..., 193
THE MERIAH SACRIFICE ..... i W. DANIELL, R.A.. . R. BRANDARD ... 198

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Tal. VII.

THE

NEW TALE BY FRANK FAIRLEGH.

On the First of November, in the First Part of the Eighth Volume of SHARPE'S LONDON MAGAZINE, will be commenced

LEWIS ARUNDEL;

OR, THE RAILROAD OF LIFE.

When that intellectual character, Mr. Merryman, first makes his appearance in the magic ring at Astley's, he announces his presence by promulgating the self-evident fact contained in the words, “ Here we are again,which he usually follows up by the polite inquiry, " Horo are you?Now, albeit I cannot pretend to rival that sapient individual in jocosity, I am by no means too proud to learn of a fool, and am unable to herald my reappearance as a candidate for public favour by any more pertinent address than " Here we are again.I say we, for the kindness which the reading public has accorded to Frank Fairlegh, has emboldened me to introduce to their favourable notice my friend Lewis Arundel, with an account of his trip along the great railroad of life.

'Tis true that men travel by different trains; some hurry on impetuously--the express train scarcely quick enough to satisfy their eagerness ; others proceed more leisurely, pausing at the various stations, and reflecting on the aim and end of their journey.

There are also different conveyances: the first-class passengers know little of the jolting and shaking, by reason of well-stuffed cushions and easy springs; while those in the second and third class carriages must put up with heat and cold, sparks, cinders, dust and steam; but now and then comes a grand smash, which knows no distinction of persons, and all classes suffer together.

Still, fare as they may on the journey, all sooner or later arrive at the same terminus, “the Grave.”

Should the scenes through which Lewis Arundel will pass be found to possess some interest, the line he chooses be deemed a good one, and the train which conveys him be voted anything but a "slow coach," his faithful chronicler, Frank Fairlegh, will be a proud and happy man.

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