Зображення сторінки
PDF
ePub
[ocr errors][ocr errors]

but he said he had thought of two names which he should like for him-Paul and Siegfried.”

Lucy. “I suppose he thought of the apostle St. Paul. But who was Siegfried ? it is an odd name.”

Mrs. 0. “ Siegfried is a very ancient name in Germany and the northern countries of Europe. There are many old songs and stories relating to a hero of this name, and he might very likely have been a brave and noble character. But it appeared to be the meaning of the name which made the count think of it for his child; it is composed of two words which mean in German victory and peace; and these words might bring to us many good and pleasant thoughts, and the count spoke of some of them in his letter. However, there is one way in which our Christian names may be of use to us all, whatever they may be—what do you think it is, Matilda ?

Matilda. Do you mean because they are our Christian names ?"

Mrs. 0. 6 Yes. I mean, that we may all be reminded of the same things as we repeat when we answer the question in the Catechism, “Who gave you this name?' I have read of a native of India, who became a Christian, and when he was to be baptised, he did not wish to be called by his former

He said, “Give me a new name, that with the help of God it may remind me of my baptism, and my profession as a Christian.'"

A pause followed, and Lucy and Matilda, who both delighted in hearing their mamma talk to them, sat still beside her, Matilda hushing the baby to sleep again. Theodore went to the other end of the room to play with little Edward and Charlotte.

In the mean time the last streak of light had almost faded from the sky, but Lucy and Matilda had begged that the candles might not be lighted yet, for they were anxious both to prolong the pleasant talk, and to watch for the arrival of the kind aunt and uncle whom they were expecting that

naine,

evening. After being silent for some time, Lucy said,

“I am so very glad, mamma, that little Mary is to be baptised to-morrow,

because of its being the 1st of November, All Saints', you know. I think there was almost no day in the whole year that one would have liked so well. Did papa and you fix it on purpose, mamma?

Mrs. o.'“No, we did not exactly fix it on pur. pose, because many circumstances happened to make it desirable that it should be to-morrow; but I feel as glad as you can do, Lucy, that it is so, especially since our dear baby is to be called after her darling sister. It does seem, as you say, as if no day could have been so suitable for bringing into the Church of Christ the little one who has been given us in her place.”

Matilda. “I think I understand you, mamma. For this afternoon, when we walked with papa through Burnley Wood, he was talking to us about to-morrow, and telling us what it was meant to remind us of.

Lucy. “I had never thought so much about it before, not even last year, though I did think of it then, for I did not know till then how much such thoughts could comfort us."

Mrs. O. “ We cannot know how sweet such comfort is, or be really thankful for it, till we have known sorrow, dear Lucy. But, Matilda, can you tell me something of what you learned from your papa this afternoon ?

Matilda paused and coloured, but after a little thought, she said, " Papa said, that to-morrow was intended to remind us, that we are not alone, and must not think only of ourselves, but that we belong to the whole Church of Jesus Christ, and that part of the Church was still on earth, and part at rest in paradise; but that we were still all one, united through Jesus Christ, and all waiting to be gathered together again."

Lucy. And he said we ought very often, and especially at such seasons, to think of the good and holy persons of all times who have gone before us, that we may try to follow their examples; and of those we have loved and lost awhile ourselves, not to make us more sad, but more happy, because we should remember that they are not really separated from us, though we cannot see them now, and that if we follow them, by doing the will of God, we shall be brought together again at the coming of our Lord Jesus Christ, and love each other even more than we could do now. Papa said the services for to-morrow were intended to bring to us such thoughts as these, and he mentioned the gospel for the day, and how we ought to learn from it the character of those who are called saints. And I thought after papa had explained all this, that it was such a pleasant day for dear baby's baptism, though I did not know her name was to be what would make me think so still more." Matilda. 6 And

you

know, Lucy, what papa said just as we came out of the wood.

Lucy. “ He said that such things as he had been telling us had comforted him and you, mamma, and that we could not begin too soon to try to think of them and feel them ourselves."

Mrs. 0. “I am very glad you have both remembered so much, my dear children.”

Lucy. The wood was so very beautiful, mamma. I wish you could have seen it. When we got nearly to the top of the hill, there was a little wind there, and the leaves were beginning to fall, but so very gently. It was just a day to make one think of those lines in the Christian Year' about the leaves falling; you know which I mean, mamma.”

Mrs. Ò. “Yes, my love, the lines our dear Mary liked so much."

Lucy. “ And was it not strange, mamma, just as I was thinking of those verses, papa repeated some words from them: he said, “The calm leaves float, evening. After being silent for some time, Lucy said,

“I am so very glad, mamma, that little Mary is to be baptised to-morrow, because of its being the 1st of November, All Saints', you know. I think there was almost no day in the whole year that one would have liked so well. Did papa and you fix it on purpose, mamma?

Mrs. o.'“No, we did not exactly fix it on purpose, because many circumstances happened to make it desirable that it should be to-morrow; but I feel as glad as you can do, Lucy, that it is so, especially since our dear baby is to be called after her darling sister. It does seem, as you say, as if no day could have been so suitable for bringing into the Church of Christ the little one who has been given us in her place.”

Matilda. “I think I understand you, mamma. For this afternoon, when we walked with papa through Burnley Wood, he was talking to us about to-mor. row, and telling us what it was meant to remind us of."

Lucy. “I had never thought so much about it be fore, not even last year, though I did think of it then, for I did not know till then how much such thoughts could comfort us."

Mrs. O. 6 We cannot know how sweet such comfort is, or be really thankful for it, till we have known sorrow, dear Lucy. But, Matilda, can you tell me something of what you learned from your papa this afternoon ?

Matilda paused and coloured, but after a little thought, she said, “ Papa said, that to-morrow wa intended to remind us, that we are not alone, arc must not think only of ourselves, but that we belorg to the whole Church of Jesus Christ, and that par of the Church was still on earth, and part at rest ir paradise; but that we were still all one, unite through Jesus Christ, and all waiting to be gatheretogether again.”

Lucy: “ And he said we ought very often, and especially at such seasons, to think of the good and holy persons of all times who have gone before us, that we may try to follow their examples; and of those we have loved and lost awhile ourselves, not to make us more sad, but more happy, because we should remember that they are not really separated from us, though we cannot see them now, and that if we follow them, by doing the will of God, we shall be brought together again at the coming of our Lord Jesus Christ, and love each other even more than we could do now. Papa said the services for to-morrow were intended to bring to us such thoughts as these, and he mentioned the gospel for the day, and how we ought to learn from it the character of those who are called saints. And I thought after papa had explained all this, that it was such a pleasant day for dear baby's baptism, though I did not know her name was to be what would make me think so still more.” Matilda. “And you know, Lucy, what papa

said just as we came out of the wood.”

Lucy. “He said that such things as he had been telling us had comforted him and you, mamma, and that we could not begin too soon to try to think of them and feel them ourselves."

Mrs. O. “I am very glad you have both remembered so much, my dear children.”

Lucy. The wood was so very beautiful, mamma. I wish you could have seen it. When we got nearly to the top of the hill, there was a little wind there, and the leaves were beginning to fall, but so very gently. It was just a day to make one think of those lines in the Christian Year about the leaves falling; you know which I mean, mamma.”

Mrs. O. “Yes, my love, the lines our dear Mary liked so much." Lucy: “ And was it not strange, mamma, just as I

thinking of those verses, papa repeated some words from them: he said, “The calm leaves float,

was

« НазадПродовжити »