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G. R. G.

ness is so infectious that his example may turn the heads, formerly. Perhaps it is that I attempt its cultivation. It of a whole district. Yet his bite is not half so venomous must come of natural buoyancy of spirits, I think, to be as that of another species—a kind of ground-shark-who genuine. It is else but a hot-house plant in a snowaffects the same sort of insanity, and while digging be- storm-its leaves torn off by the blast or shriveled in a low ground, puts his “ placer” on the “Stock List.” frosty embrace. I doubt much whether our intellectual

It is astonishing, too, that we will be caught once in a pleasures, as we proudly call them, are half as exhilaratwhile in this way, while there are people all around us, ing, and deeply steeped in genuine happiness, as were anxious friends, who exclaim, “I knew it!" but who those more animal sensations which we experienced when never hinted a word about the matter. Did it ever strike boys, as we went hallooing and shouting along in the you that we live in a very sagacious and knowing world very exuberance of our spirits, with a gay, glad, spirited -the mind of each man being simply the reflection of that defiance of care and all its imps. This was the riches of another ? Our brightest fancies are but the suggestions of the heart and not of the pucket. Was it not? We had of other people's brains-our good fortune in life is no gold in those days, so it could not have been that! always known beforehand-our reverses have always been most indubitably predicted by parties, who coufirm their sagacity with a consolatory—“ I told you so." We THE FEBRUARY NUMBER.-Our number for the last are, after all, then, but the mere creatures of the impulses month has been pronounced, everywhere, the very best of of other people-our destiny it is to work out their pre- the Magazines for the month, and has thus far so largely dictions. The iron energy, the indomitable perseverance, incrensed our sales, that we shall be obliged to issue a sleepless vigilance, untiring industry-have all been very greatly increased edition of future numbers. The weighed beforehand-duly appreciated and predicted. year 1849 seems to have opened with most unparalloled There is no such thing as surprising any body. It is all promises for magazine literature; and while our own sales perfectly understood.

have augmented on all sides, we have the gratification, in W-, by a keen sagacity in detecting, and ready tact in our good fortune, to feel that we are not impairing the managing a new business, has struck the tide that bears prosperity of our neighbors. Indeed, the Philadelphia to fortune. But he has made no discovery. Forty other magazines, high as they have heretofore stood before the men, with scarcely brains to comprehend, much less ori- country, and widely as they have been circulated, seem ginate an idea, knew all about it. They told you so! | just now to have made a bound in popular favor that W– gocs on, originates new combinations of trade, savors of romance. Fifteen or twenty thousand copies enlarges business ideas, and still succeeds. But Told yeso of a monthly magazine was formerly regarded as the knew it, and was indifferent.

highest point of success to enterprising publishers, and SHARP has his eye upon W- “Ah!" says he " there ambitious editors, but the dawning of this brighter day is a man who has a soul above buttons-a genius for busi- promises such results as a simple matter of increase on the ness. Every thing he touches turns to gold.”

year's business. We hope that our readers see, in the But W-, with his multitude of irons in the fire, incau- growing improvement of “Graham," a disposition to imtiously takes hold of the hot end of one of them, and is part a higher value to the book, as patronage increases, mained. “ BAH!” says Sharp, “I knew how it would and a careful catering to taste, which shows no falling off be! He was always rushing business up against the in efforts to please, as well as to instruct our literary stream. Bound to fail—I told you so!And yet nobody | household. Our aim has been to furnish our readers with ever knew Sharp to originate, or succeed in, any thing, a work, in point of literary excellence, that is unsurpassbut he knows-and that must be some consolation to a able, and in pictorial beauty at once chaste and elegant. ninny.

We could multiply, ad infinitum, second rate articles and But, Jeremy, not to initate the folly of this world in engravings, but we feel that we are consulting both the regard to the past, nor to affect the wisdom of the vext, to

reader's taste and interest in adhering rigidly to the course tell of the future, I have a story about mining to give you we have adopted, and we certainly have sufficient eviin my next, in which you will find both Sharps and Flats, dence of its good policy, in the ample support we have which I think will induce you to believe with me-ihat received. people who have cultivated a dangerous intimacy with The March number may fairly challenge a rigid scru. Copper-Heads ought to be cautious, and particularly shy tiny, and we invite a comparison between the literary how they now run after Gold-Bugs with a hum.

matter and that of the other magazines. The embellishC. has been in town, and I passed an evening with him ments are all most beautifully executed; but the plate of since last I wrote you. He has still the same joyous " Christ Weeping Over Jerusalem” is a gem

in the way of laugh, that used to set the table in a roar, and it is quite engraving, and we refer to it with-a conscious pride that as contagious. At every jest he would burst out with a it can neither be successfully imitated nor excelled. Our sort of a shout in his hearty guslaw, which, is practiced at eyes linger over it with something like exultation, as we home, must wake the echoes of his native mountain. I present to our readers a plate of such exquisite beauty. was thoughtful over the past, and became partially a con

In this effort even Tucker scems to have surpassed himself. vert to your theory, in regard to the chilling effects of extra city refinement; and your beautiful picture of coun- THE FAMILY MESSENGER.–This is one of the cheapest try life, with its honest, hearty friendships, came to my and best of the weekly newspapers. Its circulation is mind forcibly. It must be true, for I confess I felt that I equal to its deserts, numbering now some sixty thousand had grown older, and colder, too. Can you, Jeremy, readers. It has so long held its position before the news. laugh as of yore-as loud and as long ?—with the same paper world, and is so widely and well known, that we hearty good will and utter abandon. Or is your mirth but endorse the general opinion, when we say that it is choked and clogged with bitter remembrances, which will one of the best Family journals in the nation. How the steal upon the heart even in its gayest moments? Thought! enterprising publisher cau furnish it at a dollar per annum is it a companion with which you can entertain hilarity ? | is a wonder to us, and we have no doubt to its thousands Or is your joy overshadowed with the darkness of evil of subseribers. A specimen copy is furnished to any perthat has been, or that you anticipate, you scarce know son who may wish to see it, by application, post-paid, to why? I cannot experience the light-heartedness we had the publisher.

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OH HAVE I NOT BEEN TRUE TO THEE:

A SONG,

WRITTEN AND ADAPTED TO A BEAUTIFUL MELODY,

BY JOHN H. HEWITT.

Presented by G. Willig, No. 171 Chestnut St. Published by G. Winig Jr. Baltimore.

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thee?

SECOND VERSE.

1

Thy falcon now has thy caress,
Thy hound leaps gladly to thy beck;
But she who loves to wild excess
Cannot one pulse of feeling wake.
This should not be, I cannot brook
The icy smile thou givest me;
There's death in each reproachful look
Oh! have I not been true to thco?

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