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AUS 24
CEM
OW?

CONTENTS

PRACTICAL OBSERVATIONS,

DRAWN FROM THE EXPOSITION OF THE TEXTS WHICH ARE HANDLED AND

IMPROVED IN THIS VOLUME.

DOCTRINE. VERSE 1.

PAGE.

1. Every covenant of God had its proper

privileges and advantages

7

2. There was never any covenant be-

tween God and man, but it had some

ordinances, or arbitrary institutions of

external divine worship, annexed unto

it.

8

3. It is a hard and rare thing to have the

minds of men kept upright with God,
in the observance of the institutions of
divide worship

ib.
4. Divine institution alone is that which

renders any thing acceptable unto God 11

5. God can animate outward carnal things

with a hidden invisible spring of glory

and efficacy:

ib.

6. All divine service or worship must be

resolved into divine ordination or insti-
tution

ib.
7. A worldly sanctuary is enough for
them whose service is worldly

.

.

49

ib.

VERSE 2.

1. Every part of God's house, and the

place wherein he will dwell, is filled

and adorned with pledges of his pre-

sence, and means of communicating

his grace

15

2. The communication of sacred light

from Christ in the gifts of the Spirit, is

absolutely necessary unto the due and

acceptable performance of all holy of-

fices and duties of worship in the

church

18

3 No man, by his utmost endeavours in

the use of outward means, can obtain

the least beam of saving light, unless it

be communicated unto him by Christ,

who is the only fountain and cause

of it

ib.

VERSES 3–5.

1. The more of Christ, by the way of re-

presentation or exhibition, any institu-

tions of divine worship do contain or

express, the more sacred and holy are

they in their use and exercise

21

VOL. IV.


sin, must take care that spiritual light

do always bear sway in their minds

6

ib.

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DOCTRINE.

Page.

3. They ought constantly to watch against

the prevalency of corrupt prejudices

and affections in their mind

49

4. When the light of the mind is solicited

by temptations, to suspend its conduct

and determination on present circum-

stances, to know that sin lies at the

door, this is its last address for admis-

sion

ib.

5. If error grow strong in the heart through

the love of sin, truth will grow weak

in the mind, as to the preservation of

the soul from it

ib.

6. Nothing ought to influence the soul

more unto repentance, sorrow, and hu-

miliation for sin, than a due apprehen-

sion of the shameful error and mistake

that is in it.

50

VERSE 8.

1. The divine ordinances and institutions

of worship are filled with wisdom suffi-

cient for the instruction of the church

in all the mysteries of faith and obedi-

52

2. It is our duty, with all humble dili-

gence, to inquire into the mind of the

Holy Ghost in all ordinances and in-

stitutions of divine worship

ib.

3. Although the Lord Christ was not ac-

tually exhibited in the flesh under the

old testament, nor had actually offered

himself unto God for us, yet had be-

lievers then an actual access into the

grace and favour of God, though the

way, the cause, and means of it, was

not manifestly declared unto them 57

4. The design of the Holy Ghost in the

tabernacle, and in all its ordinances

and institutions of worship, was to di-

rect the faith of believers unto what

was signified by them

58

5. Typical institutions, attended diligently

unto, were sufficient to direct the faith

of the church unto the expectation of

the real expiation of sin, and accept-

ance with God thereon

ib,

6. Though the standing of the first taber.

nacle was a great mercy and privilege,

yet the removal of it was a greater ib.

7. The divine wisdom in the economy

and disposal of the revelation of the

way into the holiest, or of grace and

acceptance with himself, is a blessed

object of our contemplation

ib.

8. The clear manifestation of the way of

redemption, of the expiation of sin, and

peace with God thereon, is the great

privilege of the gospel

ib.

9. There is no access into the gracious pre-

sence of God, but by the sacrifice of

Christ alone

ib.

VERSE 9.

1. There is a state of perfect peace with

God to be attained under imperfect*

obedience

65

Verse 10.

1. There is nothing in its own nature so

mean and abject, but the will and au-

thority of God can render it of sacred

use and sacred efficacy, where he is

pleased to ordain and appoint it

70

2. The fixing of times and seasons, for

the state of things in the church, is

solely in the hand of God, and at his

sovereign disposal

ib.

3. It is a great part of the blessed liberty

which the Lord Christ brought into the

church, namely, its freedom and liberty

from legal impositions, and every thing

of the like nature in the worship of

God

4. The time of the coming of Christ was

the time of the general final reforma-

tion of the worship of God, wherein all

things were unchangeably directed un-

to their proper use

ib.

VERSE 11.

1. The bringing forth and accomplishing

the glorious effects of the hidden wis-

dom of God, were the true and real

good things intended for, and promised

to the church, from the beginning of

the world

76

2. These things alone are absolutely good

to the church, all other things are good

or evil as they are used or abused ib.

3. So excellent are these good things,

that the performance and procuring of

them was the cause of the coming of

the Son of God, with his susception

and discharge of his sacerdotal office. ib.

4. Such a price and value did God put on

these things, so good are they in his

eyes, that he made them the subject of his

promises to the church from the foun-

dation of the world

5. The human nature of Christ, wherein

he discharged the duties of his sacer-

dotal office in making atonement for

sin, is the greatest, the most perfect,

and excellent ordinance of God, far

excelling those that were most excel.

lent under the Old Testament

79

6. The Son of God undertaking to be the

high priest of the church, it was of ne-

cessity that he should come by, or

have a tabernacle, wherein to discharge

that office

ib.

7. God is so far from being obliged unto

any means for the effecting of the holy

counsels of his will, that he can, when

he pleaseth, exceed the whole order

and course of the first creation of all

things, and his providence in the rule

thereof

82

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DOCTRINE.

Page.

VERSE 12.

1. The entrance of our Lord Jesus Christ

&: our high priest into heaven, to ap-

pear in the presence of God for us,

and to save us thereby to the utter-

most, was a thing so great and glori-

ous, as could not be accomplished but

by his own blood

93

2. Whatever difficulties lay in the way of

Christ, as unto the accomplishment

and perfection of the work of our re-

demption, he would not decline them,

Dor desist from his undertaking, what-

ever it cost him

ib.

3. There was a holy place, meet to re-

ceive the Lord Christ after the sacrifice

of himself; and a suitable reception

for such a person, after so glorious a

performance

94

4. If the Lord Christ entered not into the

holy place until he had finished his

work, we may not expect an entrance

thereinto until we have finished ours , ib.

Verses 13, 14.

1. There is such an evidence of wisdom

and righteousness, unto a spiritual eye,

in the whole mystery of our redemp-

tion, sanctification, and salvation by

Christ, as gives an immoveable foun-

dation unto faith to rest upon, in its

receiving of it.

102

2. The efficacy of all the offices of Christ

towards the church, depends on the

dignity of his person

ib,

3. There is nothing more destructive to

the whole faith of the gospel, than by

any means to evacuate the immediate

efficacy of the blood of Christ 106

4. Christ's offering himself was the great-

est expression of his inexpressible love 108

5. It is evident how vain and insufficient

are all other ways of the expiation of

sin, with the purging of our consciences

before God

ib.

6. Faith hath ground of triumph in the

certain efficacy of the blood of Christ

for the expiation of sin

121

7. Nothing could expiate sin and free

conscience from dead works, but the

blood of Christ alone, and that in the

offering himself to God through the

eternal Spirit

122

8. It was God, as the supreme ruler and

lawgiver, with whom atonement for

sin was to be made.

ib.

9. The souls and consciences of men are

wholly polluted, before they are pur-

ged by the blood of Christ

ib.

10. Even the best works of men, antece-

DOCTRINE.

Page

separably conjoined, in the design of

God's grace by the blood of Christ. 122

12. Gospel worship is such in its spiritu-

ality and holiness, as becometh the

living God

ib.

VERSE 15.

1. It is an act of mere sovereign grace in

God to provide such a blessed inheri.

tance for any of them, who had sinfully

cast away what they were before in-

trusted withal .

127

2. All our interest in the gospel inheri-

tance depends on our receiving the

promise by faith

129

3. The conveyance and actual communi-

cation of the eternal inheritance by

promise, to be received by faith alone,

tends exceedingly unto the exaltation

of the glory of God, and the security

of the salvation of them that do be-
lieve

ib.

4. Effectual vocation is the only way of

entrance into the eternal inheritance 130

5. Though God will give grace and glory

unto his elect, yet he will do it in such

a way, as wherein and whereby he

may be glorified also himself

ib.

6. Such is the malignant nature of sin, of

all transgression of the law, that un-

less it be removed, unless it be taken

out of the way, no person can enjoy

the promise of the eternal inheritance 132

7. It was the work of God alone to con-

trive, and it was the effect of infinite

wisdom and grace to provide a way for

the removal of sin, that it might not be

an everlasting obstacle against the com-

munication of an eternal inheritance

unto them that are called .

ib,

8. A new testament providing an eternal

inheritance in sovereign grace, the con-

stitution of a mediator, such a mediator

for that testament in infinite wisdom

and love, the death of that testator for

the redemption of transgressions, to ful-

fil the law and satisfy the justice of

God, with the communication of that

inheritance by promise, to be received

by faith in all them that are called, are

the substance of the mystery of the

gospel

136

9. The efficacy of the mediation and death

dently to the purging of their consci-

ences by the blood of Christ, are but

dead works

ib.

11.

Justification and sanctification are in

of Christ extended itself to all the call.

ed under the old testament, is an evi-

dent demonstration of his divine nature,

his pre-existence to all these things,

and the eternal covenant between the

Father and him about them

ib.

10. The first covenant did only forbid

and condemn transgressions ; redemp-

tion from them is by the new testament

alone

ib.

11. The glory and efficacy of the new

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DOCTRINE.

Pace.

covenant, and the assurance of the

communication of an eternal inherit-

ance by virtue of it, depend hereon,

that it was made a testament by the

death of the mediator, which is farther

proved in the following verses

136

VERSES 16, 17.

1. It is a great and gracious condescen-

sion in the Holy Spirit, to give encou.

ragement and confirmation unto our

faith, by a representation of the truth

and reality of spiritual things, in those

which are temporal, and agreeing with

them in their general nature, where-

by they are presented unto the common

understandings of men

143

2. There is an irrevocable grant of the

whole inheritance of grace and glory

made unto the elect in the new cove-

nant

ib.

3. As the grant of these things is free and

absolute, so the enjoyment of them is

secured from all interveniences by the

death of the testator

ib.

VERSE 18.

1. The foundation of a church state among

any people, wherein God is to be ho-

noured in ordinances of instituted wor.

ship, is laid in a solemn covenant be-

tween him and them

151

2. Approbation of the terms of the cove-

nant, consent unto them, and solemn

acceptance of them are required on

our part, unto the establishment of any

covenant between God and us, and our

participation of the benefits of it 153

3. It was the way of God from the begin-

ning, to take children of covenanters

into the same covenant with their pa-

ib.

4. It is by the authority of God alone

that any thing can be effectually and

unchangeably dedicated unto sacred

use, so as to have force and efficacy

given unto it thereby

ib.

VERSE 19.

1. There can be no covenant between

God and men, but in the hand or by

virtue of a mediator.

154

2. A mediator may be either only an in-

ternuntius, a messenger, a day's-man;

or also a surety and an undertaker ib.

3. None can interpose between God and

a people in any sacred office, unless he

be called of God and approved of the

people, as was Moses

ib.

4. 'A covenant that consisted in mere pre-

cepts, without an exhibition of spiritual

strength to enable unto obedience, could

never save sinners

155

5. In all our dealings with God, respect

must be had unto every one of his pre-

cepts

ib.

we are ready to be polluted on all oc-

casions

ib.

5. This variety of institutions was a great

part of the bondage state of the church

under the old testament

ib.

6. The great mystery wherein God in-

structed the church from the founda-

tion of the world, especially by and

under legal institutions, was that all

purging of sin was to be by blood 164

7. This is the great demonstration of the

demerit of sin, of the holiness, righte-

ousness, and grace of God

165

VERSE 23.

1. The glory and efficacy of all ordi-

nances of divine worship which con-

sist in outward observance (as it is

with the sacraments of the gospel),

consist in this, that they represent and

exhibit heavenly things unto us 168

2. We ought to have a due consideration

to the holiness of God in his worship

and service

.

rents

. 169

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