The Fate of the Earth

Передня обкладинка
When Jonathan Schell heard all that loose talk about attainment of objectives in a limited nuclear war, it was too much for him. He did what all of us would like to do: he wrote a book. It's very pessimistic. The mere presence of all those weapons is enough to ensure that sometime, somewhere, someone is going to set one off. Schell makes sure all of us know the horrendous possibilities of a nuclear exchange & all the reasons for bringing such possibilities to a halt. Everyone agrees. The question is, how do we get these monsters under control?

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LibraryThing Review

Рецензія користувача  - nmele - LibraryThing

Nearly thirty years old, this book is still, unfortunately, a must-read. The threat of nuclear war is very real and no one explores its consequences better than Schell. Читати огляд повністю

LibraryThing Review

Рецензія користувача  - vegetarian - LibraryThing

Of course, today we are EMPHASIZING climate disruption, and this had been modeled and predicted before. Reflecting analytically about the issues of ecological ethics are not entirely different ... Читати огляд повністю

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Про автора (1982)

Jonathan Schell was born in Manhattan, New York on August 21, 1943. He received a bachelor's degree in Far Eastern history from Harvard University and spent a year studying Japanese at the International Christian University in Tokyo. In 1967, while heading home from his year abroad in Japan, he stopped in Vietnam, where he witnessed Operation Cedar Falls, an aerial campaign designed to level Ben Suc, which was known as a Vietcong stronghold. This experience led to his first book The Village of Ben Suc. His other non-fiction works include The Fate of the Earth, The Gift of Time: The Case for Abolishing Nuclear Weapons Now, The Unfinished Twentieth Century, The Unconquerable World, and The Seventh Decade: The New Shape of Nuclear Danger. He was a staff writer for The New Yorker from 1967 to 1987. He also worked as a columnist for Newsday and New York Newsday and as a correspondent for The Nation. He taught at numerous universities including Yale, Princeton, Wesleyan, and N.Y.U. He died of cancer on March 25, 2014 at the age of 70.

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