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NORFOLK WINDOW.

289

Winding beneath the earth a spacious range
Of subterraneous chambers yet is seen,
Where first, in secrecy, the BARONS met
To frame the Code of FRBEDOM! Short the space
From hence to where my humble cot is hid
By wild sequestered scenery; and oft
Bending my footsteps downward do I seek
The rock-hewn seats that round The Cave remain,
And muse with awfully-delighted mind,
While witchery of fancy brings to view
Majestic forms and men of other times,
Those AGED PBERS whose venerable locks,
A crested helm, the terror oft of France,
Concealed in iron bands—those youthful Lords
Who, proud of martial splendour, shone in arms
Which, back reflecting every torch's blaze,
With double light THB SACRED Vault illum'd !
There mitred Langton with Fitzwalter brave,
Clark, Albermarle and Gloster, Hereford,
Mowbray and Oxford, Delaval and Say,
Norfolk, De Ros, and bands of heroes more,
Retir'd to fan the patriotic fire
Which, bursting into day at RUNNYMBDE,
With rays of glory lighten'd all the land!

DIBDIN.

A superb Painted Window, called the NORFOLK WINDOW, representing the Signing of Magna Chartą at Runnymede, is just finished for Arundel Castle, in Sussex. FITZWALTER, the principal Baron, bears the likeness of the late Duke of Norfolk. ARCHBISHOP LANGTON is finely delineated as taking a part in the august transaction. The LORD MAYOR OF

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NORFOLK WINDOW.

The whole pos

LONDON, in his robes, exhibits a resemblance of Harvey Combe, Esq. during his mayoralty, whilst the other figures are altogether so striking as to kindle, by a single glance, the glow of patriotism in the heart. In the back ground are seen the pitched tents of the Barons at RUNNYMEDE. sesses a magnificent appearance, and emblazons forth one of the most important events recorded by the pen of the historian in the annals of our COUNTRY! The introduction of the late Duke of Norfolk among the illustrious group, is marked by a pecnliar propriety. When at ARUNDEL CASTLE, in 1814, I had the honour of seeing and speaking to his Grace; his stately port and commanding presence rendered him no unfit representative of an ancient Baron, especially upon the recollection that he was throughout the whole of his career the firm and indefatigable advocate of Civil and RELIGIOUS LIBERTY. It is, indeed, impossible that the friend of Fox, as well as the zealous supporter of the Brunswick family, should have been, at any time, inimical to the imprescriptible and unalienable rights of MANKIND,

I am,

My dear young Friend,

Yours, &c.

J. E..

LETTER X.

ARRIVAL AT WINDSOR; WALKING OF THE KING ON THE TERRACE,

ACCOMPANIED BY THE PRINCESSES; HIS DRESS; HIS CHEERFULNESS, AFFABILITY AND CONDESCENSION; FILIAL PIETY OF THE PRINCESSES; ETIQUETTE OF THE COMPANY ; SETTING OF THE SUN; KING RIDING ON HORSEBACK WITH HIS ATTENDANTS; RULOGIUM ON THE BRUNSWICK FAMILY; HISTORY OF WINDSOR CASTLE UNDER THE SEVERAL SOVEREIGNS; WITH A DESCRIPTION OF IT, AND ITS ANCIENT CURIOSITIES; ITS PRESENT STATRY AND A SKETCH OF ITS APARTMENTS WITH THEIR EMBELLISII

MENTS; THE KEEP OR ROUND TOWER, WITH ITS PROSPECT; CHAPEL OF ST. GEORGE; WILL OF HENRY EIGHTH; INTERIOR OF THE CHAPEL OF ST GEORGE ; BODIES OF HENRY BIGHTH AND CHARLES FIRST FOUND AND EXAMINED; DBCEASE AND FUNERAL OF THE PRINCESS AMELIA; ODE ON DEATH; INSTITUTION OF THE MOST NOBLE ORDER-OP THB GARTER; POOR KNIGHTS OP WINDSOR; THE DEAN AND CANONS OF WINDSOR ; CHARACTER OF GEORGE THE THIRD; CONCLUSION.

Islington, July, 1810. MY DEAR YOUNG FRIEND, WE entered Windsor about six o'clock, and having refreshed ourselves at the inn with a cup of tea, hastened to the Terrace, where we found a considerable portion of genteel company.

Intent on the gras

292

DESCRIPTION OF HIS MAJESTY.

tification of a laudable curiosity, we felt peculiarly happy in joining them on this occasion. It was seven o'clock, and THE GOOD OLD King soon made his appearance with his accustomed punctuality. A little door in the castle was thrown open, when two attendants were seen leading this venerable personage with great care down a flight of steps till he safely alighted upon the terrace. Then the Princesses Elizabeth and Augusta, who were present, accompanied him, one on each side, or rather took hold of his arm; they paced backwards and forwards for an hour, two bands of music playing alternately; the fine tones of the several instruments being heightened by the stillness of closing day. The King was dressed neatly; blue coat with gilt buttons and star, white waistcoat and small clothes, white stockings and gold buckles in his shoes. His hat somewhat resembled that worn by the clergy, with the addition of a gold button and loop, rounted by a black cockade, which *marks him out conspicuously from the rest of the company. His MAJESTY looked ruddy and full; his voice sonorous, and he converses with cheerfulness, though, when he attempts to speak rather hastily, it is with hesitation. His want of sight is very apparent, for his hat is drawn over the upper part of his face, and he feels about with his cane, especially ascending or descending a step. It is affecting to see him, though he appears cheerful when he speaks, and seems as if nothing were the matter with him. He

THE PRINCESSES.

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now and then stops to converse either with the officers or with the nobility and gentry. We saw him several times on the Terrace; but on this first evening there was a more than ordinary degree of conversation. He was full of inquiries respecting the installation of LORD GRENVILLE, as Chancellor of the University of Oxford, which had taken place during the week. He inquired also about the balloon in which Mr. Sadler had ascended on the occasion, and was particularly anxi. ous to know how long it continued in the air and where it had alighted. Harrow on the Hill was mentioned, though the spot had not then been ascertained, He conversed at all times on a variety of topics with the utmost freedom and even hilarity. This daily promenade must benefit both his mind and body, while the presence, as well as the attention, of so many of his subjects, some coming from distant parts, must yield him no inconsiderable gratification. The countenances of the PRINCESSES are replete with good nature, and most exemplary is their attention to their aged parent. This, indeed, is their best praise, their noblest recommendation. Filial piety is the characteristic attribute of humanity. It sheds a lustre upon all the other virtues which enrich and adorn the GREAT FAMILY of Mankind. It should be mentioned that the King, in returning back to his apartments in the Castle, passing by the band of musicians on the steps, always touched his hat, and said, in an audible voice, “ Gentlemen, GOOD NIGHT,

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