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up the standard of discipline and scholarship as he enlarged the school and brought it more fully under his influence.

Stanton's arrangements at first were such that he was not obliged to spend his whole time in the school-rooms. For assistant he employed a emale teacher who had been trained in one of our best New England academies. She had complete knowledge of wbat she was to teach, and the steady patience and perseverance necessary for thorough drilling of her classes; besides, she had the New England ideas of duty and discipline; she had obeyed strict regulations in school, and in turn expected obedience of her pupils. Her manner was quiet and dignified, some times seeming severe, but generally gentle, and never in the least overbearing. The school-room was frequently left in her charge, and there were several classes which some times recited to Stanton and some times to her.

For a considerable time all went well in school. Perhaps the Western courtesy to women coincided with the dignity of the teacher and the ambition for good standing wbich was aroused by Stanton's new government, so that even the roughest boys, those who had defied all authority, both at home and at school, were as ready to obey Miss Gilbert as Stanton himself. But at length a spirit of insubordination was manifest, which seemed to indicate that three boys, nearly grown, had determined to break down Miss Gilbert's authority. When she had the care of the room, or was hearing their classes, they were disorderly, communicating with each other, occasionally whispering, laughing, or getting up trifling play. Her glance of displeasure was met by a look of cool indifference: when called by name in reproof of their behavior, they soon renewed the offense, and plainly set her at naught. If Stanton was in the room or heard them recite, they were perfectly respectful and orderly, and could not be detected in any impropriety.

Stanton was unwilling to interfere to support Miss Gilbert's authority on what seemed to be such slight necessity. The spirit that actuated the three young men (as they might be considered) was evident, and the conspiracy undoubted; but unless it came out in more overt acts, it would appear both to them and to the rest of the school, that she was unable to maintain her authority without a constant and visible support from the principal. It would not do to let them drive her to a perpetual reporting of minor delinquencies. Stanton resolved to compel them either to yield to her, or rebel so openly that the intervention of the supreme authority should be manifestly called for. “As a doctor" said Stanton, “some times hastens the crisis of a disease, and thus forwards its cure, so I determined to make those boys see where they stood, and choose between rebellion and unqualified obedience; I was sure they would choose the former.”

Giving Miss Gilbert his view of the matter, and directions for the execution of the plan, one day he spent more than usual time in the schoolroom, and heard many classes. Whenever he detected a pupil holding communication with another he instantly called him by name, and ordered

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him to stand up and remain standing until permitted to sit down. Some were called up at their desks, others at recitation; in either case the new punishment was a great mortification, but no one hesitated to obey. The three conspirators, Grosstate, Thorpley, and Royston, were, as was expected, blameless; but the whole school wondered at the innovation.

Next day Miss Gilbert was left in the chair as usual. When she called up the class containing these boys, they soon renewed their misconduct. She ordered Grosstate to stand up. He refused, adding insolent language to the refusal. Before the recitation was through, Royston and Thorpley had each received and disobeyed the same direction, but without insolent replying. No further notice was taken of the matter, and things went on as usual through the day. Stanton had wished to deal with Grosstate first, because he had least courage and obstinacy, and was the weak point in the conspiracy. His special insolence gave reason for calling him first to account.

At the close of school in the afternoon Stanton had given the signal of the bell to prepare for dismission, and the pupils were waiting for the signal for departure, which was never given till the bustle of putting away books bad subsided to perfect silence. When every eye was upon him with expectation, he suddenly turned to Grosstate and said sternly, “Alfred Grosstate, this morning you were guilty of insolent conduct to your teacher, Miss Gilbert. You knew that sitting in my place she had full authority over the school; but you told her you would not mind her. Now,” drawing his watch and laying it on the table as he spoke, "I give you two minutes to confess your offense, say that you are sorry for it and will do better. If you do not do so, we will settle the matter after school."

Corporal punishment was almost unknown in the school. What might be meant by “settlement after school” was not known; but that it was something to be feared was manifest, and it was known that corporal pun. ishment might prove very severe.

As Stanton ceased speaking, every eye turned from him to Grosstate. No one stirred. Not a breath was beard. The culprit was taken by sarprise. He had expected to be notified to remain, and had made up his mind to take a moderate whipping, but without giving up his rebellious spirit. Now he was in a pillory of shame. The steadfast artillery of eyes on every side distressed him. The unwonted silence and attention concentrated the impression, while the stern glances of the teacher were like arrows of fire. He turned red, then pale, then flushed up again. His face quivered and was distorted with contending emotions, while his limbs moved in little jerks, and he twisted his body on his seat, looking only at the master before him, who was looking some times at him, some times at the school, and some times at the watch. “One minute has passed," said Stanton. There was no change, but that his face showed that his will was failing under the trial. “Thirty seconds are left," said the teacher. "I don't know what you want me to say,” stammered Grosstate. “You know you were impudent to Miss Gilbert and refused to obey her, and

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up the standard of discipline and scholarship as he enlarged the school and brought it more fully under his influence.

Stanton's arrangements at first were such that he was not obliged to spend his whole time in the school-rooms. For assistant he employed a emale teacher who had been trained in one of our best New England academies. She had complete knowledge of what she was to teach, and the steady patierce and perseverance necessary for thorough drilling of her classes; besides, she had the New England ideas of duty and discipline; she had obeyed strict regulations in school, and in turn expected obedience of her pupils. Her manner was quiet and dignified, some times seeming severe, but generally gentle, and never in the least overbearing. The school-room was frequently left in her charge, and there were several classes which some times recited to Stanton and some times to her.

For a considerable time all went well in school. Perhaps the Western courtesy to women coincided with the dignity of the teacher and the ambition for good standing which was aroused by Stanton's new government, so that even the roughest boys, those who had defied all authority, both at home and at school, were as ready to obey Miss Gilbert as Stanton himself. But at length a spirit of insubordination was manifest, which seemed to indicate that three boys, nearly grown, had determined to break down Miss Gilbert's authority, When she had the care of the room, or was hearing their classes, they were disorderly, communicating with each other, occasionally whispering, laughing, or getting ap trifling play. Her glance of displeasure was met by a look of cool indifference: when called by name in reproof their behavior, they soon renewed the offense, and plainly set her at naught. If Stanton was in the room or heard them recite, they were perfectly respectful and orderly, and could not be detected in any impropriety.

Stanton was unwilling to interfere to support Miss Gilbert's authority on what seemed to be such slight necessity. The spirit that actuated the three young men (as they might be considered) was evident, and the conspiracy undoubted; but unless it came out in more overt acts, it would appear both to them and to the rest of the school, that she was unable to maintain her authority without a constant and visible support from the principal. It would not do to let them drive her to a perpetual reporting of minor delinquencies. Stanton resolved to compel them either to yield to her, or rebel so openly that the intervention of the supreme authority should be manifestly called for. “As a doctor" said Stanton, “some times hastens the crisis of a disease, and thus forwards its cure, so I determined to make those boys see where they stood, and choose between rebellion and unqualified obedience; I was sure they would choose the former."

Giving Miss Gilbert his view of the matter, and directions for the execution of the plan, on day he spent more than usual time in the schoolroom, and heard many classes. Whenever he detected a pupil holding communication with another he instantly called him by name, and ordered

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him to stand up and remain standing until permitted to sit down. Some were called up at their desks, others at recitation; in either case the new punishment was a great mortification, but no one hesitated to obey. The three conspirators, Grosstate, Thorpley, and Royston, were, as was expected, blameless; but the whole school wondered at the innovation.

Next day Miss Gilbert was left in the chair as usual. When she called up

the class containing these boys, they soon renewed their misconduct. She ordered Grosstate to stand up. He refused, adding insolent language to the refusal. Before the recitation was through, Royston and Thorpley had each received and disobeyed the same direction, but without insolent replying. No further notice was taken of the matter, and things went on as usual through the day. Stanton had wished to deal with Grosstate first, because he had least courage and obstinacy, and was the weak point in the conspiracy. His special insolence gave reason for calling him first to account.

At the close of school in the afternoon Stanton had given the signal of the bell to prepare for dismission, and the pupils were waiting for the signal for departure, which was never given till the bustle of putting away books bad subsided to perfect silence. When every eye was upon him with expectation, he suddenly turned to Grosstate and said sternly, fred Grosstate, this morning you were guilty of insolent conduct to your teacher, Miss Gilbert. You knew that sittiog in my place she had full authority over the school; but you told her you would not mind her. Now," drawing his watch and laying it on the table as he spoke, "I give you two minutes to confess your offense, say that you are sorry for it and will do better. If you do not do so, we will settle the matter after school."

Corporal punishment was almost anknown in the school. What might be meant by “settlement after school” was not known; but that it was something to be feared was manifest, and it was known that corporal punishment might prove very severe.

As Stanton ceased speakicg, every eye turned from him to Grosstate. No one stirred. Not a breath was heard. The culprit was taken by sarprise. He had expected to be notified to remain, and had made up his mind to take a moderate whipping, but without giving up his rebellious spirit. Now he was in a pillory of shame. The steadfast artillery of eyes on every side distressed him. The unwonted silence and attention concentrated the impression, while the stern glances of the teacher were like arrows of fire. He turned red, then pale, then flushed up again. His face quivered and was distorted with contending emotions, while his limbs moved in little jerks, and he twisted his body on his seat, looking only at the master before him, who was looking some times at him, some times at the school, and some times at the watch. "One minute has passed,” said Stanton. There was no change, but that his face showed that his will was failing under the trial. “Thirty seconds are left," said the teacher. “I don't know what you want me to say,” stammered Grosstate. “You know you were impudent to Miss Gilbert and refused to obey her, and

yon can say so; you know whether you are sorry for it, and will behave better, and you can say so. Fifteen seconds are left.” In an instant he was on his feet, faltered out the required apology almost ia Stanton's words, and subsided into his seat, thoroughly conquered.

He was never again disrespectful to any of his teachers in that school; and when, some months later, Miss Gilbert died unexpectedly one night, and the announcement was made in school next morning, the sorrowful face and tearful eyes of Alfred Grosstate bore testimony to his kindly regard and true respect for her. Perhaps a touch of remorse deepened the feeling.

The other boys were soon disposed of. They were not noticed that day, but knew that something awaited them. Thorpley's conduct was mention. ed to his father, and home influence and the teacher's admonitions brought him back to his daty, Royston had had difficulty with previous instructors; Stanton talked with him kindly two or three times, and urged him not to forfeit the good character he had begun to earn, and warned him him that the end with him would be dismissal from the school. He chose the wiser course, and confessed and forsook his rebellion.

Stanton never repeated this expedient, for he had no occasion so to do, and part of its effect came from its novelty. Had he required instant submission, the boy might have refused it; had he given him forewarning, he might have gathered his powers of resistance; and if the apology had been left to be given next day, his fellows would have strengthened bis courage. They ridiculed him for yielding in two minutes, but were weakened by his defection, and strongly impressed by the promptitude, energy, and determination of their teacher: they learned that he would vindicate his anthority and maintain his government, choosing his own times and ways. Those“ two minutes" exercised the fell specter of insubordination, so that it vanished forever from that school.-A. E. T.-Illinois Teacher.

ROOKFORD SOHOOLS.

ROCKFORD, ILL., May 18th, 1858. FRIEND CRAIG :-If all your correspondents are as negligent as myself, I am sure that you have reason to suspect men's promises. I have seen much in schools during my recent travels in Wisconsin and Northern Illinois that I believe would interest your readers, could they have seen also, through the columns of the Journal; but I have not found time at the moment to pen the impressions as I promised, so they are among the

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