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TABLE OF CONTENTS.

A

Page.

Page.

Æsthetic education,

231, 863 Monograph of the verb,

40

A development of the fundamental notions Moral and religious instruction in common

of grammar,

301 schools,

20, 49, 80, 114

Admirable use of a magnet,

77 Mother ! let us pray!

117

After the rain,
842 My boy at home,

58
Always teaching,

308

American normal school association, 144

N

An incident in school government, ? National teachers' association,

108
A perfect school system,

871

Aspects of education,

1 Normal schools,

73, 146, 375

At Rugby,
369 Now I lay me down to sleep,

57

A valuable table,

284

O

o

Obituary-Mrs. E. W. McMynn,'

32

Cheerfulness,

184 Old Hundred,

240

Children,

243 Our school house,

188

Columbia co. teachers' association,

180

Communications in school,

87

P

Composition as a daily exercise in school, 166

Parental responsibility,

324

Physical education,

827

D

Primary schools,

161, 366

Difficulties,

165

E

R

EDITORIAL MISCELL ANY, 29, 62, 94, 122, 157,190,

Reading,

262, 267, 328

43

221, 249, 285, 819, 345, 377.

References,

Education a mental possession,

193 Report on revision of the school law,

Errors in the mode of teaching English

Ripon teachers' association,

179, 235

Rockford schools,

10

grammar,
170

839

Essay on normal schools,

Rulers of the world for 1859,

245

Extracts from the autocrat of the break-

fast table,

152

s

F
School government,

326

+ Failures,

861

Schools

in Greenbush,

46

Female teachers and their salaries, 107, 169 Schools in Sauk co.,

44

Fitchburg schools,

72

School superintendency,

14

Shakspeare,

G

Some of the things we teach children, 263

Spelling,

167, 283

Girls' Schools,

33

St. George and Amerigo Vespucci,

242

Grammar in rhyme,

315 State teachers' association-proceedings

Greatness,

27

of aunual meeting,

84

Steam fire-engines,

208

H

Summer land,

213

- Henry Barnard, LL.D.,

225 SUPERINTENDENT'S DEPARTMENT, 16. 47, 78,113,

Hymn of the Marsellaise,

244

147, 213, 287, 274, 309, 329

I

T

Improprieties of speech,

75

Tardiness,

237

L

Teaching the alphabet,

163

45

Letter for the little folks,

Teaching reading,

247, 281, 816

279

LITERARY NOTICES, 64, 96, 127, 160, 205, 825, To parents,

To a group of school children,

74

888
Topical recitation,

257, 298, 353
The builders,

119

M

The Burns' prize poem,

311

MATHEMATICAL DEPARTMENT, 60, 93, 120, 156, The first day of summer,

370

217, 282, 317, 843, 372 The London Times log,

871

Miss Kindly's method of teaching chil. The mediatorial office,

260
dren to read,
295 The model teacher

289

Modesty preferred to death,

118 The relations of the sexes,

242

277

Watertown schools,

Waupaca teachers' association,

U

Waushara co. teachers' institute,

Uncle Sam's school,

154 | What is life?

321, 357

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SIGNS OF THE TIMES-FEMALE TEACHERS-TEACHERS' WAGES, ETO.

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It is vain to cling to, and try to carry with us into the "living present," any portion of the “dead past." We may sigh for the “good old times," and deprecate the changes which steamships, railroads, telegraphs, and divers inventions besides, have wrought in the social, industrial, and moral relations of life and conditions of being ; but we can not stay the force that hurries us along. The part of wisdom is to note carefully what these changes are—what new features they present—what new conditions they create—what new obligations they impose—what new efforts they necessitate in our several spheres of action-lest by neglect of this observance, we too late discover all our careful plans of action ending in naught, because not adapted to the new conditions, with which, to ensure success, they must harmonize. Edacation, whether comprehensively considered as a system or scheme of weans for the promotion of intelligence and virtue throughout the commonwealth, or simply as a single practical effort to instruct a youthful community called a school, or contemplated as & subject of philosophic icvestigation, is not an exception to the conditions of change impressed upon other forms of being, and other subjects of thought. And yet, in education, more than in most other things, save perháps, theology, is there the tendency in the popular mind to cast upon it the light of the past-to surround it with the same condicions—to regard it from the same point of view—as composed of the same elementscontrolled by the same forces-promoted by the same means-producing the same results-exhibiting the same phenomena now as formerly. But this idea is all wrong, and wrought into practical schemes must produce disastrous results. Let us look at one simple condition of change in educational affairs which may not be regarded by all as very important, but of which we may as well be cognizant-and it shall be my present theme.

There was a time--and those of us whose heads are not very silvery can remember it too-when for the young man who aspired to a position outside the path of common drudgery and slavish toil, the teacher's vocation was the readiest introduction thereto. This was so, chiefly for the reason that "in that elder day” the pursuits exempt from the condition of manual labor were fow, and to gain access to these demanded a discipline or preparation which the business of teaching was well calculated to impart-to say nothing of sundry and divers expenses which the attainment of that position involved, and which a season of teaching was found to be the readiest means to discharge. I shall not be disputed if I remark that it is measurably otherwise now. The employments more congenial than grinding toil have multiplied in a ratio far exceeding the increase of our population. Not to incumber this article with statistics, it will suffice to suggest how the wonderful increase of trade has created a demand for clerks, book keepers, and salesmen ; railroads have given employment to engineers, superintendents, agents, and conductors; the telegraph bas enlisted a standing or sitting army of operators; and journalism has called to its aid a host of reporters and other subordinates. These illustrations must serve to impress our minds with the effect which this growing condition of things must have apon that vocation, into which, in the past, nearly all the higher and worthier intelligence of the land found its way. Apprehensions will naturally arise, that the inducements held out in other pursuits must draw off so many of that better class, as to compel the acceptance of an inferior class to supply their place. Nor are these apprehensions groundless. I am persuaded, that taking the body of teachers throughout the State to-day, and comparing it with that of fifteen years ago, we shall find less of that earnest purpose, that rigid discipline, that stirring enthusiasm, that conscientious heroism and consecrated devotion that characterized teaching when that profession was chiefly filled by those who were striving for higher intellectual culture, and regarded a successful experience in teaching as a means to its attainment. I doubt whether, on the whole, we have to-day, as good schools throughout the State as fifteen years ago. For to be as good, they must be better; they must have advanced as fast as the world has advanced; more is demanded of them now--(I do not mean more things are to be taught, for this neglecting the simpler yet weightier matters in order to grasp after the varied and superficial, is the bane of true progress and improvement)-but more system, more thoroughness, more rigid discipline is demanded now than hereto. fore, and I greatly fear we have less; but if we simply have no more, then our schools are worse than formerly, because less adapted to the require

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