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MEMOIR OF SAMUEL TAYLOR COLERIDGE

Religious Musings; a Desultory Poem 13

The Destiny of Nations; a Vision . 17

JUVENILE POEMS

1

Genevieve

2 SIBYLLINE LEAVES :-

Sonnet, to the Autumnal Moon .

ib.

POEMS OCCASIONED BY POLITICAL EVENTS, OR

Time, Real and Imaginary, an Allegory . . ib.

FEELINGS CONNECTED WITH THEM.
Monody on the death of Chatterton ib.

21

Songs of the Pixies

4

Ode to the Departing Year

23

The Raven, a Christmas Tale, told by a

France; an Ode

School-boy to his little Brothers and Sisters 5

Fears in Solitude ; written in April, 1798,

24

Absence: a Farewell Ode on quitting School

during the alarm of an Invasion...

for Jesus College, Cambridge.

Fire, Famine, and Slaughter; a War Eclogue 26

Lines on an Autumnal Evening.

Recantation-illustrated in the Story of the

ib.

27

The Rose

Mad Ox

The Kiss

II. LOVE POEMS.

• To a Young Ass—its Mother being tethered

Introduction to the tale of the Dark Ladie 28-

near it

Lewti, or the Circassian Love Chaunt ... 29

Domestic Peace.

.

The Picture, or the Lover's Resolution 30
The Sigh

ib.

The Night Scene; a Dramatic Fragment . 31-
Epitaph on an Infant.

ib.

To an Unfortunate Woman, whom the Au-

Lines written at the King's Arms, Ross

Lines to a beautiful Spring in a Village

thor had known in the days of her inno-

cence...

32

Lines on a Friend, who died of a frenzy fe-

To an Unfortunate Woman at the Theatre 33

ver induced by calumnious reports ib.

Lines, composed in a Concert-room ..... ib

To a Young Lady, with a Poem on the French

The Keepsake

ib

Revolution.

ib.

To a Lady, with Falconer's “ Shipwreck". 34

Sonnet. “My heart has thanked thee, Bowles!

To a Young Lady, on her Recovery from a

for those soft strains"

9

Fever ..

16

· As late I lay in slumber's shadowy

Something childish, but very natural-writ-

vale"

ib.

ten in Germany

ib.

“Though roused by that dark vizir,

Home-sick-written in Germany

it.

Riot rude".

ib.

Answer to a Child's Question.

ib.

“When British Freedom for a hap The Visionary Hope . ...

35

pier land"

ib.

The Happy Husband; a Fragment.

iB

." It was some spirit, Sheridan! that

Recollections of Love ....

ib

ib.

On Revisiting the Sea-shore after long ab-

“O what a loud and fearful shriek

sence .....

ib.

was there".

ib.

The Composition of a Kiss

36

-"As when far off the warbled strains

are heard”.

10 III. MEDITATIVE POEMS.

“Thou gentle look, that didst my Hymn before Sun-rise, in the Vale of Cha-
soul beguile"

ib.
mouny

ib

" Pale roamer through the night!

Lines written in the Album at Elbingerode,

thou poor forlorn !"

ib. in the Hartz Forest

37

Lú Sweet Mercy! how my very heart On observing a Blossom on the 1st of Feb-
has bled"

ib.
ruary, 1796

ib.
" Thou bleedest, my poor heart! and The Eolian Harp-composed at Clevedon,
thy distress".
ib. Somersetshire

ib.
To the Author of the “ Robbers" . ib. Reflections on having left a Place of Retire-

Lines nposed while climbing the left as-

38

cent of Brockley Coomb, Somersetshire, To the Rev. Geo. Coleridge of Ottery St.

May, 1795.

ib. Mary, Devon-with some Poems 39

Lines, in the manner of Spenser

11 Inscription for a Fountain on a Heath ib.

imitated from Ossian

ib.

A Tombless Epitaph . .

39

The Complaint of Ninathoma

ib. This Lime-tree Bower my Prison

40

Lines, imitated from the Welsh.

ib. To a Friend, who had declared his intention

to an infant

ib. of writing no more Poetry ...

ib.

in answer to a Letter from Bristol .. 12 To a Gentleman-composed on the night

to a Friend, in answer to a melancholy

after his Recitation of a Poem on the

Letter

Growth of an Individual Mind

41

.

13

.....102

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The Nightingale; a Conversation Poem. . 42 PART II. THE SEQUEL, ENTITLED “THE

Frost at Midnight .

43

USURPER'S FATE"

To a Friend, together with an unfinished

Poem ...

ib. THE PICCOLOMINI, OR THE FIRST PART

The Hour when we shall meet again 44

OF WALLENSTEIN; a Drama, trans-

Lines to Joseph Cottle .....

ib.

lated from the German of Schiller .. 121

IV. ODES AND MISCELLANEOUS POEMS.

THE DEATH OF WALLENSTEIN; a Tra-

The Three Graves; a Fragment of a Sex.

gedy, in Five Acts

168

ton's Tale

ib.

Dejection; an Ode..

48 THE FALL OF ROBESPIERRE; an Historic

Ode to Georgiana, Duchess of Devonshire 49

Drama

. 203

Ode to Tranquillity

... 50

To a Young Friend, on his proposing to do MISCELLANEOUS POEMS :-

mesticate with the Author .

ib.

Lines to W. L. Esq., while he sang to Pur PROSE IN RHYME ; OR EPIGRAMS, MORALITIES,

cell's Music

51

AND THINGS WITHOUT A NAME.

Addressed to a Young Man of Fortune,

Love..

212

who abandoned himself to an indolent

and causeless Melancholy

ib.

Duty surviving Self-love, the only Sure

Friend of Declining Life; a Soliloquy . 213

Sonnet to the River Otter . .

ib.

composed on a Journey homeward ;

Phantom or Fact? a Dialogue in Verse ib.

Work without Hope.

ib.

the Author having received intelligence

Youth and Age

ib.
of the Birth of a Son, Sept. 20, 1796. . ib.

214

Sonnet-To a Friend, who asked how I felt

A Day-dream.

when the Nurse first presented my In-

To a Lady, offended by a sportive observa-

ib.

fant to me..

tion that women have no souls

52

" I have heard of reasons manifold". 16.

The Virgin's Cradle Hymn

ib.

On the Christening of a Friend's Child

Lines suggested by the Last Words of Be.

ib.

rengarius . .

ib.

Epitaph on an Infant ..

ib.

The Devil's Thoughts

ib.

Melancholy; a Fragment ..

ib.

Constancy to an Ideal Object .

215

Tell's Birth-place-imitated from Stolberg 53

The Suicide's Argument, and Nature's An-

A Christmas Carol ...

ib.

ib

Human Life, on the Denial of Immortality ib.

The Blossoming of the Solitary Date-tree;

The Visit of the Gods—imitated from

a Lament

216

Schiller

54

Fancy in Nubibus, or the Poet in the

Elegy-imitated from Akenside's blank

Clouds

il
verse Inscriptions .

ib.

The Two Founts; Stanzas addressed to a

Kubla Khan; or a Vision in a Dream. ib.

The Pains of Sleep .

Lady on her recovery, with unblemished

55

looks, from a severe attack of pain ib.

APPENDIX.

What is Life?

217

Apologetic Preface to “ Fire, Famine, and

The Exchange

ib.

Slaughter

ib. Sonnet, composed by the Sea-side, October,

THE RIME OF THE ANCIENT MARINER 60

1817.

16.

Epigrams

ib.

CHRISTABEL

66

The Wanderings of Cain.

218

REMORSE; a Tragedy, in Five Acts

73

Allegoric Vision ..

220

ZAPOLYA; a Christmas Tale.

The Improvisatore, or “ John Anderson, my

Part I. THE PRELUDE, ENTITLED “ THE

jo, John"...

222

USURPER'S FORTUNE"

96

The Garden of Boccaccio.

224

16

swer

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THE

POETICAL WORKS

OF

SAMUEL T. COLERIDGE.

Juvenile Poems.

PREFACE.

impelled to seek for sympathy ; but a Poet's feelings

are all strong. Quicquid amet valde amat. Akenside COMPOSITIONS resembling those here collected are

therefore speaks with philosophical accuracy when not unfrequently condemned for their querulous he classes Love and Poetry, as producing the same Egotism. But Egotism is to be condemned then only

effects : when it offends against time and place, as in a His

Love and the wish of Poets when their tongue tory or an Epic Poem. To censure it in a Monody

Would teach to others' bosoms, what so charms

Their own. or Sonnet is almost as absurd as to dislike a circle

Pleasures of Imagination. for being round. Why then write Sonnets or Mono There is one species of Egotism which is truly dies ? Because they give me pleasure when perhaps disgusting ; not that which leads us to communicate nothing else could. After the more violent emotions our feelings to others but that which would reduce of Sorrow, the mind demands amusement, and can the feelings of others to an identity with our own. find it in employment alone : but, full of its late suf The Atheist, who exclaims “pshaw!" when he ferings, it can endure no employment not in some glances his eye on the praises of Deity, is an Egotist : measure connected with them. Forcibly to turn an old man, when he speaks contemptuously of Loveaway our attention to general subjects is a painful verses, is an Egotist: and the sleek Favorites of and most often an unavailing effort.

Fortune are Egotists, when they condemn all “ mel. But 0! how grateful to a wounded heart

ancholy, discontented” verses. Surely, it would be The tale of Misery to impart

candid not merely to ask whether the poem pleases From others' eyes bid artless sorrows flow, And raise esteem upon the base of Woe!

ourselves, but to consider whether or no there may Sharo.

not be others, to whom it is well calculated to give The communicativeness of our Nature leads us to an innocent pleasure. describe our own sorrows; in the endeavor to de. * I shall only add, that each of my readers will, I scribe them, intellectual activity is exerted ; and hope, remember, that these Poems on various subfrom intellectual activity there results a pleasure, jects, which he reads at one time and under the inwhich is gradually associated, and mingles as a cor-Auence of one set of feelings, were written at differrective, with the painful subject of the description. ent times and prompted by very different feelings; " True!" (it may be answered)" but how are the and therefore that the supposed inferiority of one Public interested in your sorrows or your Descrip Poem to another may sometimes be owing to thu tion ?” We are for ever attributing personal Unities temper of mind in which he happens to peruse it. to imaginary Aggregates. What is the PUBLIC, but a term for a number of scattered individuals ? of whom My poems have been rightly charged with a pru as many will be interested in these sorrows, as have fusion of double-epithets, and a general turgidness experienced the same or similar.

I have pruned the double-epithets with no sparing Holy be the lay

hand ; and used my best efforts to tame the swell Which mourning soothes the mourner on his way. and glitter both of thought and diction.* This latter If I could judge of others by myself, I should not hesitate to affirm, that the most interesting passages

Without any feeling of anger, I may yet be allowed to are those in which the Author develops his own express some degree of surprise, that after having run the feelings? The sweet voice of Cona* never sounds a too ornate and elaborately poetic diction, and nothing hav

critical gauntlet for a certain class of faults, which I had, viz. 80 sweetly, as when it speaks of itself; and I should ing come before the judgment-seat of the Reviewers during almost suspect that man of an unkindly heart, who the long interval

, I should for at least seventeen years, quarter could read the opening of the third book of the Para- after quarter, have been placed by them in the foremost rank dise Lost without peculiar emotion. By a Law of our ridicule for faults directly opposite, viz. bald and prosaic lan

of the proscribed, and made to abide the brunt of abuse and Nature, he, who labors under a strong feeling, is guage, and an affected simplicity both of matter and manner

-faults which assuredly did not enter into the character of • Ossian.

my compositions.-Literary Life, i 51. Published 1817

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fault however had insinuated itself into my Religious And when thou lovest thy pale orb to shroud C
Musings with such intricacy of union, that some Behind the gather'd blackness lost on high;
times I have omitted to disentangle the weed from And when thou dartest from the wind-rent cloud
the fear of snapping the flower. A third and heavier Thy placid lightning o'er the awaken'd sky
accusation has been brought against me, that of ob Ah such is Hope' as changeful and as faire
scurity ; but not, I think, with equal justice. An Now dimly peering on the wistful sight;a
Author is obscure, when his conceptions are dim Now hid behind the dragon-wing'd Despair
and imperfect, and his language incorrect, or unap But soon emerging in her radiant might, a
propriate, or involved. A poem that abounds in She o'er the sorrow-clouded breast of Care e
allusions, like the Bard of Gray, or one that imper Sails, like a meteor kindling in its flight e
sonates high and abstract truths, like Collins's Ode
on the poetical character, claims not to be popular-
but should be acquitted of obscurity. The deficiency
is in the Reader. But this is a charge which every
poet, whose imagination is warm and rapid, must

TIME, REAL AND IMAGINARY. expect from his contemporaries. Milton did not

AN ALLEGORY. escape it; and it was adduced with virulence against Gray and Collins. We now hear no more of it: On the wide level of a mountain's head not that their poems are better understood at present, (I knew not where, but ’t was some faery place than they were at their first publication ; but their Their pinions, ostrich-like, for sails outspread, fame is established ; and a critic would accuse him Two lovely children run an endless race, self of frigidity or inattention, who should profess A sister and a brother ! not to understand them. But a living writer is yet This far outstript the other ; sub judice; and if we cannot follow his conceptions Yet ever runs she with reverted face, or enter into his feelings, it is more consoling to our And looks and listens for the boy behind : pride to consider him as lost beneath, than as soaring For he, alas! is blind ! above us. If any man expect from my poems the O'er rough and smooth with even step he pass'd, same easiness of style which he admires in a drink. And knows not whether he be first or last. mg-song, for him I have not written. Intelligibilia, non intellectum adfero.

I expect neither profit nor general fame by my writings; and I consider myself as having been

MONODY ON THE DEATH OF amply repaid without either. Poetry has been to me its own “ exceeding great reward :” it has soothed

CHATTERTON. my afflictions; it has multiplied and refined my enjoyments; it has endeared solitude: and it has given O WHAT a wonder seems the fear of death, me the habit of wishing to discover the Good and Seeing how gladly we all sink to sleep, the Beautiful in all that meets and surrounds me. Babes, Children, Youths and Men,

S. T. C.

Night following night for threescore years and tel
But doubly strange, where life is but a breath

To sigh and pant with, up Want's rugged steep
JUVENILE POEMS.

Away, Grim Phantom! Scorpion King, away

Reserve thy terrors and thy stings display
GENEVIEVE.

For coward Wealth and Guilt in robes of state

Lo! by the grave I stand of one, for whom
Maid of my Love, sweet Genevieve ! A prodigal Nature and a niggard Doom
In beauty's light you glide along :

(That all bestowing, this withholding all) Your eye is like the star of eve,

Made each chance knell from distant spire or come
And sweet your voice, as seraph's song. Sound like a seeking Mother's anxious call,
Yet not your heavenly beauty gives

Return, poor Child! Home, weary Truant, home!
This heart with passion soft to glow :
Within your soul a voice there lives! Thee, Chatterton! these unblest stones protect
It bids you hear the tale of woe.

From want, and the bleak freezings of neglect.
When sinking low the sufferer wan

Too long before the vexing Storm-blast driven, Beholds no hand outstretch'd to save,

Here hast thou found repose ! beneath this sod! Fair, as the bosom of the swan

Thou! O vain word! thou dwell'st not with the clod
That rises graceful o'er the wave,

Amid the shining Host of the Forgiven
I've seen your breast with pity heave, Thou at the throne of Mercy and thy God
And therefore love I you, sweet Genevieve! The triumph of redeeming Love dost hymn

(Believe it, O my soul!) to harps of Seraphim.

Yet oft, perforce ('t is suffering Nature's call,)
SONNET.

I weep, that heaven-born Genius so shall fall;
TO THE AUTUMNAL MOON.

And oft, in Fancy's saddest hour, my soul

Averted shudders at the poison'd bowl.
Mild Splendor of the various-vested Night! Now groans my sickening heart, as still I view
Mother of wildly-working visions ! hail!

Thy corse of livid hue ;
I watch thy gliding, while with watery light to Now indignation checks the feeble sigh,
Thy wenk eye glimmers through a fleecy veil ; Or flashes through the tear that glistens in mine eye.

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