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Trina'cria (Thrina'cria, Thrina'cia): the
island of Sicily, having three promon-
tories.

Triptol'emus, 182; and the Eleusinian

mysteries, 184.
Tris'tia, 29.

Tritogene'a,Trito'nia: an epithet applied
to Minerva (Athene); meaning born
near Lake Tritonis, or head-born, or
born on the third day.

Tri'ton, 86, 87; the Tritons, 97. 222, 342.

Triv'ia: Hecate, or Diana of the Cross-
ways, 84.

Troe'zen, in Argolis, 259.

Tro'Ilus, a son of Priam, killed by Achil-
les; see also Com. \\ 165 (5), 167.

Trojan War, mentioned, 24, 25, 27, 112,
113, 125, 199, 273; houses concerned
in, 277-283; origin, 285; narrative of,
285-302; fall of Troy, 303-308; sur-
vivors of the war, 308-312.

Tropho'nius, oracle of, Com. § 38.

Tros, son of Erichthonius of Troy, and
grandson of Dardanus; Com. \ 165 (5).

Troy, 284-308, et passim, 147, 189; Com.
109, 167, 17a

Tubal, 12.

Tubalcain, 12.

Tur'nus, 354~36S-

Twelve Brothers, the story of, analogy of

incident, Com. § 94.
Tya'nean, 106.
Ty'che; see Fortuna.
Ty'deus, 273, 287; Com. § 148.
Tydi'des, Com. §§ 48, 76; see Diomede,
Tyn'dareus, or Tyn'darus, 277. 281, 282,

330; family of, Com. § 165 (3).
Tyndar'idae (Castor and Pollux), 28a;

Com. J 76.
Tyn'daris: patronymic of a female de-
scendant of Tyndareus; Helen or

Clytaemnestra; Com. § 76.
Typho'eus, the youngest son of Ga»;

later identified with Typhon.
Ty'phon, 41, 341; but also called the

son of Typhoeus and a hurricane;

Com. § 21.
Tyr or Ziu, 369, 370, 389.
Tyrian dye, 11o.

Tyrians of Cadmus, 115; T. flowers, 160.

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Vayu; see under Hindoo divinities (1).
Ve, 366, 367.
Vedas, the, 35.

Vedic religion; see under Hindoo divin-
ities (1).

Venera'lia, Com. § 40.

Ve'nus (Aphrodite), 3; daughter of Di-
one, 52; foam-born, 65; her attributes,
65-68; her various influence, her fa-
vorite animals, cities, etc., artistic con-
ceptions of V., 66; E. R. Sill's poem,
The V. of Milo, 66-68; star of, 73;
among the Romans, 88; Cypris, 93,
152, 153; mother of Harmonia, 96,
138; myths of, 150-172; V. and
Adonis, 150, 151; Liment for Adonis,
Lang's transl. of Bion, 151, 152; Cupid
and Psyche, 152-161; Atalanta's race,
Hippomenes (or Milanion), 162-164;
Hero and Leander, 164-167; Pygma-
lion and Galatea, 167-170; Pyramus
and Thisbe, 170,171; Phaon, 171,172;
285, 287,290, 293, 309, 343; Com. §§ 40,
93-100; and see Rossetti, p. 540.

Verdandi, 367.

Vergelmer, 366.

Ver'gil (Vergil'ius) account of, and oi
the ^Eneid, 28; reference to Georgics,
220; to the ^Eneid, 79, 8i, 256, 304,
305, 307, 308; outline of /Eneid, 338-
365; transl. Com. \ 12; /Encid, \\ 174-
176.

Vertum'nus, 89, 213.
Vesper, 161.

Ves'ta (Hestia), 69; Com. § 42.
Vestal Virgins, 70.
Victo'ria (Nike), 73.
Vigrid, 388.
Vili, 366, 367.
Vingolf, 367.

Vishnu; see under Hindoo divinities (1).
Vithar, 369, 389.
Vol'scens, 362.

Volsung, Volsungs, the saga of, 33, 392-

3991 Com. § 185.
Void, 37.

Vritm . s under Hindoo divinities (1).

meaning of names, 58; his lameness,
his wives, Aglaia and Aphrodite, 59;
among the Romans, Mulciber, 88; his
wife Maia, 89; myths of V., 117, 118;
made the chariot of the Sun, 122; V.
and Orion, 147; 260, 262, 273, 297, 298,
365; Com. J§ 37, 71.
Vylsa, 35.

Water-nymphs, 77, 85, 87.

Waters, Greek gods of, 85-87; older
dynasty, 85; younger d., 85, 86; lesser
divinities, 86, 87; Wordsworth's " The
world is too much with us," 87; myths
of Neptune, 189-191; of lesser divini-
ties, 215-222.

Winds, the, Greek names and attri-
butes, 72.

Wodan, Wuotan, Woden; see Odin.

Wooden horse, the, 305, 329.

World, conception of, among Greeks, 74.

World-egg, 37.

Worms, 401-403.

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ADDENDA.

Cerco'pes: grotesque and gnome-like
rascals, two of whom, while Hercu-
les was sleeping, made off with his
weapons; but, caught by him, were
strapped knees-upward to either end
of a yoke, and so borne away by the
hero. Their drollery, however, re-
gained them their liberty. Some of
them, having deceived Jupiter, were
changed to apes. They were the sub-
ject of a comic poem by Homer, and
of numerous grotesque representations
in Greek literature and sculpture.

Hippot'a-des: jtolus II, son of Hip'po-
tes. Identified by Homer (Od. x, 2)
and by Ovid (Met. xiv, 224) with
jColus III, king of the Winds. Mil-
ton, Lycid. 96. See Com. \ 113 (5).

Ja'nus; see p. 512. As god of good be-
ginnings, which ensure good endings,
Janus is a promoter of civilization. Gel-
lius (v, 12); Ovid (Fasti 1, 179). Ac-
cording to Macrobius (S. 1, 9-15) he
is Consivius the Sower. Compare
Dryden, Epist. to Congreve 7.

Mer'o-pe; see p. 514. Of Arcadia,
daughter of King Cypselus, of the
race of Callisto. Her husband. Cres-
phontes, the Heraclid, king of Mes-

senia, had been slain with two of his
sons by rebellious nobles, and one
Polyphontes, leader of the revolt,
reigned in his stead. But i£p'y-tus,
the third son of Merope, who had
been concealed by her in Arcadia,
returned thence, in due season, unbe-
known to her and in disguise, to wreak
vengeance on the murderers of his
sire. Pretending to have slain -4£py-
tus, the stranger won the favor of
Polyphontes, but came near losing his
life at his mother's hands. A recog-
nition being happily effected, iEpytus,
aided by his mother, put Polyphontes
to death, and took possession of the
kingdom. Sources: Hvgin. (Fab. 184);
Apollod. (ii, 8); Pausan. (ii, 18; iv. 3,
etc.); Aristotle (Poetics xiv, 9 on the
lost Cresphontes of Euripides). Poems:
Dramatized by Maffei (1713). Voltaire
(1743), Alfieri (1783), and by others;
but recently (1857) by Matthew Arnold,
whose Merope is at once a masterpiece
of classical invention and of poetic exe-
cution.

Pan'o-pe; see p. 518. Also, one of the
Nereids (Iliad xviii, 45). See Milton,
Lycid. 99.

INDEX OF MODERN AUTHORS AND
ARTISTS.

[Unless otherwise stated', references are to pages of the Text. Section numbers pre-
ceded by Com., refer to the illustrative notes of the Commentary. The sections corre-
spond with those of the Text.]

Addison, Joseph, 1672-1719. Transl.
Metamorphoses, Com. § 12; Com.
\ 175, Spectator, 343.

Akenside, Mark, 1721-1770. Com. §§ 43,
115, Pleasures of Imagination; § 43,
Ode on Lyric Poetry; Ode to Hesper;
§ 51, Ode to Sleep.

Albani, Francesco, 1578-1660 (paint.).
Com. § 41, Mercury and Argus; § 89,
Diana and her Nymphs, Action (two
pictures, Dresden); § 126, Galatea and
Cupids.

Aldrich, T. B., 1836 . Com. § 167,

Pillared Arch and Sculptured Tower.

Anderson, R. B. Com. 177-184, Norse
Mythology; Horn's Scandinavian Lit-
erature; Younger Edda.

Angelo, Michael (Buonarotti), 1474-1563
(sculpt, and paint.). Com. § 38, Apollo;
§ 43, The Fates; § 46, The Drunken
Bacchus; § 51, A Fury; § 93, Dying
Adonis; § 117, Mask of Satyr; § 174,
Sibyls.

Armstrong, John, 1709-1779. The Art
of Preserving Health, Com. §§ 38, 52-
54, 68, I33-137-

Arnold, Sir E., 1832 . Com. § 15,

Indian Idylls, Light of Asia; § 59,
Hymn of the Priestess of Diana; § 96,
transl. Musceus; \ 167, Iphigenia.

Arnold, M., 1822-1888. Quotation from
The New Philomela, 258, 259; from

Balder Dead, 381-390; Com. § 43,
Euphrosyne, Urania; § 46, Baccha-
nalia; 52-54. The New Sirens;
j 83, Empcdoeles; 139-143, Frag-
ment of a Dejaneira; § 151, The New
Philomela; 158-164, Fragment of
an Antigone; \ 171, The Strayed Rev-
eller. For his Merope, see p. 526.
Ashe, Thos., 1836-1889. Com. § 43, The
Lost Eros.

Bacon, Lord, 1561-1626. Wisdom of
the Ancients; his method of explain-
ing Greek Myths, 12.

Bandinelli, B., 1487-1559 (sculpt.). Com.
139-143, Hercules and Cacus.

Banks, J. Transl. Hesiod, Callimachus,
and Theognis (Bonn's Lib.).

Barnfield, Richard, 1574-1627. Com.
§ 151, Song, "As it fell upon a day"
(Philomela).

Bartsch, K. F. Der Nibelunge Not, 34 n;
Com. § 185.

Bates, H. (paint.). Com. § 94, Psyche.

Baumeister. Denkmaler d. Klassischen
Alterthums; see List of Illustra-
tions.

Beattie, James, 1735-1803. Com. \\ 139-
143, Battle of Pygmies and Cranes;
§ 167, The Judgment of Paris.

Beaumont, Francis, 1586-1616, and
John Fletcher, 1579-1625. Com. § 43,
Cupid's Revenge; 152-157, Maid's
Tragedy.

Beddoes, Thomas Lovell, 1803-1849.
Com, \ 97, Pygmalion; \ 105, Stygian
Naiades.

Benfey and Cosquin. Cited by Lang,
19 n.

Bennett, W. C, 1820 . Com. § 97,

Pygmalion.
Bernini, Lorenzo, 1598-1680 (sculpt.).

Com. §§ 50,105, Pluto and Proserpine;

§ 85, Apollo and Daphne.
Beyschlag, J. R., 1838 (paint.). Com.

\ 94, Psyche; \ 107, Orpheus and Eu-

rydice.

Birch, R. Guide to Egyptian Rooms,
Com. § 15.

Blackie, J. S., 1809 •. Com. § 126,

Galatea; 152-157, Ariadne, The
Naming of Athens; § 167, Judgment
of Paris.

Blake, William, 1757-1827. See Intro-
duction, To the Muses.
Bland (and Merivale). Transl. Greek

Anthology, Com. §11.
Bodenhausen, C. von (paint.). Com.

§ 96, Hero and Leander.
Bodmer, J. J. Referred to, 33; publ.

Nibelungenlied, Com. \ 185.
Bologna, Giovanni da, 1524-1608

(sculpt.). Com. \ 41, Flying Mercury;

\\ 139-143, Hercules and Centaur.
Bordone, Paris, 1500 (?)-i570 (paint.).

Apollo, Marsyas, and Midas (Dresden),

136 and Com. § 83 a; 104.
Bouguereau, A. W., 1825 (paint.).

Com. \ 43. Cupid and a Butterfly; \ 46,

Youth of Bacchus; § 117, Nymphs

and Satyr.

Bowring, E. A. Com. § 31, transls. of
Schiller; \ 43, Goethe's Ganymede;
§ 62, Schiller's Semele; § 125, Schiller's
Cranes of Ibycus; § 138, Schiller's
Pegasus in Harness.

Brandi, Giacinto, 1623-1691 (paint.).
Daedalus fastening Wings on Icarus,
§ 150 (Dresden).

Browning, E. B.. 1809-1861. Reference
to, 151; extract from The Dead Pan,
20i; Com. 22-25, Prometheus

Bound; § 94, Psyche; § 117,Flush, or
Faunus; § 126, transl. Theocritus;

152-157, paraphrases on Nonnus
and Hesiod; § 168, paraphrase on
Homer.

Browning, R., 1812-1889. Passage from
his Balaustion's Adventure, 133-136;
Com. § 80, Apollo and the Kates;

81, 139-143, Balaustion's Adven-
ture; § 107, Eurydice and Orpheus;
§ 116, Pan and Luna; 139-143,
Aristophanes' Apology; 152-157,
Artemis Prologizes; § 167, Agamem-
non; § 175, Ixion.

Bryant, Jacob. Advocate of theological
intemretation, 12.

Bryant, W. C, 1794-1878. Transl. ot
the Odyssey; Com. 133-137, of Simoni-
des' Lament of Danae; Com. § 171,
transl. Odyssey (1871).

Bucklie, T. A. Com. § II, transl.
^Eschylus.

Bugge, Sophus. Com. §§ 177-184, Edi-
tion of Elder Edda.

Buchanan, R. W., 1841 . Cited or

quoted; from his Satyr, 204, 205; from
his Naiad, 207,208; Com. § 17, Cloud-
land; § 49. Ades, King of Hell; §§52-
54, Naiad; § 92. Selene, the Moon;
§ 97, Pygmalion the Sculptor; § 99,
Sappho on the Leucadian Rock;
f 107, Orpheus; J 116, Pan; § 126,
Polvpheme's Passion; \ 130, Proteus;
§ 171, Penelope; 177-184, Balder
the Beautiful.

Bulfinch. S. G., 1809-1870. Extract from
his translation of Schiller's Ideal and
Life, 243.

Bulfinch, Thos., 1796-1867. The Age of
Fable; see Preface to this volume.

Burgos, G. Transl. Greek Anthology,
Com. § 11.

Burne-Jones, E., 1833 (paint.). Com.

§ 43, Cupid; § 94, Pan and Psyche;
? 97, Pygmalion; J 98. Cupid, Pyra-
mus, Thisbe; § 107, Orpheus and
Eurydice ; § 117, Nymphs; 134-
137, Perseus and the Graiae; § 168,
Feast of Peleus; § 171, The Wine of
Circe.

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