Louisa May Alcott's Fairy Tales and Fantasy Stories

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Univ. of Tennessee Press, 1992 - 392 стор.
While these stories can make no claim to being great art, they are an important segment of Alcott's canon. They demonstrate that, while she was exploring new territory with some of her work, she was also working within the existing tradition of the didactic fairy tale.
 

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Зміст

Evas Visit to FairyLand
17
LilyBell and Thistledown
29
Little Bud
51
Little Annies Dream OR The Fairy Flower
59
Ripple the WaterSpirit
67
The Rose Family
79
What the Bells Saw and Said
106
ShadowChildren
115
The Moss People
192
What Fanny Heard
202
The Autobiography of an Omnibus
215
Rosas Tale
223
What Becomes of the Pins
233
A Christmas Dream and How It Came True
255
The Candy Country
268
The Skipping Shoes
281

What the Swallows Did
125
Little Gulliver
133
The Whales Story
141
A Strange Island
148
Fancys Friend
156
Madam Cluck and Her Family
171
Fairy Pinafores
181
Rosys Journey
294
The Three Frogs
311
The Fairy Spring
324
The Brownie and the Princess
339
Mermaids
355
The Silver Party
380
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Про автора (1992)

Louisa May Alcott was born in Germantown, Pennsylvania, in 1832. Two years later, she moved with her family to Boston and in 1840 to Concord, which was to remain her family home for the rest of her life. Her father, Bronson Alcott, was a transcendentalist and friend of Ralph Waldo Emerson and Henry David Thoreau. Alcott early realized that her father could not be counted on as sole support of his family, and so she sacrificed much of her own pleasure to earn money by sewing, teaching, and churning out potboilers. Her reputation was established with Hospital Sketches (1863), which was an account of her work as a volunteer nurse in Washington, D.C. Alcott's first works were written for children, including her best-known Little Women (1868--69) and Little Men: Life at Plumfield with Jo's Boys (1871). Moods (1864), a "passionate conflict," was written for adults. Alcott's writing eventually became the family's main source of income. Throughout her life, Alcott continued to produce highly popular and idealistic literature for children. An Old-Fashioned Girl (1870), Eight Cousins (1875), Rose in Bloom (1876), Under the Lilacs (1878), and Jack and Jill (1881) enjoyed wide popularity. At the same time, her adult fiction, such as the autobiographical novel Work: A Story of Experience (1873) and A Modern Mephistopheles (1877), a story based on the Faust legend, shows her deeper concern with such social issues as education, prison reform, and women's suffrage. She realistically depicts the problems of adolescents and working women, the difficulties of relationships between men and women, and the values of the single woman's life.

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