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Mr. Boyle survives in his works; but if we would see him express'd by real life, we must turn our eyes upon your Lordship, and your noble family, in whom reign, to perfection, the fine taste, and the comprehensive genius; the candid; generous, and communicative temper, so eminently predominant in Mr. Boyle.

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100

23. The simple and primary colours but 44. To find what kind of salt, whether

few.

p. 65 acid, volatile or fixed, predominates

24. The sun's light stain'd with the co in an asign'd liquor or saline body.

lours of transparent bodies in passing

tbro' them.

ib. 45. One body changed into more, of

25. Apparent colours compound as the different colours, by a colourless in-

genuine.

66 gredient.

26. Experiments made with a colour'd 46. Changes of colours produced in a

prism.

dry, white body, by spring water. 91

27. Limpid liquors may afford colour- 47. A permanent colour produc'd by a

ed vapours.

ib. particular arrangement of parts. 92

28. Several ways of producing a green 48. Various colours produced in diffe-

with a blue and yellow.

68 rent parts of the same liquor. ib.

29. The manner wherein this colour 49. Changes of colour may greatly de-

may possibly be produced. 69 pend upon the peculiar texture of the

30. The mixture of every yellow and menftruum.

94

every blue will not afford a green. 70 50. The different colours of met als in

31. The colours of the rain-bow exhibit different states.

95

ed in very thin

substances. ib. 51. An easy method of examining ores.

32. Syrup of violets, and the juice of

blue-bottles, by a change of colour di- 52. The way of making counterfeit

stinguis an acid from an alkali. 71 gems.

ib.

33. The production of a blue colour. 53. Mineral solutions may give diffe-

73 rent colours from their own.

34. Of a red.

ib. 54. The method of preparing a yellow

35. What quantity of a limpid liquid a

vegetable lac.

ib.

pigment may tinge:

74 55. Alum, being a strong matter, dif-

36. Acid, alkaline, and urinous falts, folved by acid, may, when used as a

change the colours of many vegetable precipitart, be itself, precipitated.

productions.

ib.

37. Changes of colour by digestion, &c.

particularly a redness. 77 A free enquiry into the vulgar

38. Different effects of an acid, in the

notion of nature.

production of colours, reconciled. 8o

39. The colours of the fumes of bodies,

SECT. I.

and of the substances they form, ob-
served in distillations, &c. ib.

HE vulgar notion of nature

40. Various changes of colour, caused

prejudicial to religion and

by saline spirits, in the tinctures of philosophy.

106

vegetables.

81 2. The great ambiguity of the word na-

41. A colour instantly generated, and

109

perfeElly destroyed.

83 3. Means of avoiding this ambiguity.

42. Tbe chymical reason of this pheno-

84 4. Whether the nature of a thing be the

43. The preceeding cxperiment varied. law it receives from the creator. 111

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116

5.

Aristotle's definition of nature ob-

SECT. II.

scure and unsatisfactory.

p. 112

3. Whether final causes are to be ex-

SECT. II.

pected in all, or only in some parti-

cular bodies?

p. 159

6. The received notion of nature, what?

4. Evident marks of design in the stru-

113

Elure of the eyes, and other parts of

7. A new notion of nature, general

animals.

ib.

161

and particular, advanced.

8. Ill effeêts of the vulgar notion of 5. Chance, an imaginary being. 166

nature upon religion.

ib.

6. Revelation allows us to speak more

9. Reasons against admitting the vulgar

positively of final causes than natu-

ral philosophy

168

notion of nature.

10. The reasons whereon the vulgar

SECT. III.

notion of nature depends, examined.

123 7. How inanimate bodies may aEt for

11. The vulgar notion of a crisis ex ends wherewith they are unacquaint-

amined.

129 ed.

170

SECT. IV.

SECT. III.

12. Axioms about naiure, how far, and

8. How final causes are to be consider-

ed.

172

in what sense, to be admitted. 134

ib.

13. Whether every nature preserves itt 9. As to the celestial bodies.

10. And those that are terrestrial. 175
felf?

ib.
14. Wbether nature never fails of her

11. 'Tis often allowable from the mani-

end?

fest and apposite uses of the parts of

135

15. Whether nature always afts by the

animal bodies, to colleet some of the
Joortest ways

particular ends, for which tbe crea-

136

16. Whether she always does what is

tor design'd them : and in some cases

from the known nature and structure

137

17.Whether nature abhors a vacuum?

of the parts, to draw probable con-

jectures about the particular offices of

18. Whether nature cures diseases? 140

them.

177

19. Whether nature be a substance or

12. It is rational, from the manifest

an accident, body and spirit?

fitness of some things to cosmical or

145

20. The use and advantages of this

animal ends, to infer, that they

enquiry.

were thereto ordain’d by an intelli-

148

gent agent,

180

An enquiry into the final causes 13. We ought not to be hasty in conclu-

of natural things.

ding upon the particular use of a

thing, or the motive which induced

SECT. 1.

the author of nature to frame it in a

peculiar manner.

Hether the final causes of na-

14. The naturalist should not suffer the
tural things are knowable

to men?

search, or discovery of final causes,

150

to make him undervalue or neglect

2. Final causes, what they may signify.

the enquiry after their efficients. 194

151

Things

best?

.

1.

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3. The immortality of the soul. p. 241
Things above reason consider’d. 4. And settling the belief of a divine

providence.

242

SECT. I.

5. Experimental philosophy draws the

Hings above reason of three
mind from sensual tbings.

246

kinds.

6. Gives it a docility.

p. 197

247

2. Incomprehensible.

6. 7. And a fitness for searching into deep

3. Inexplicable.

ib.

truths.

ibid.

4. Unsociable.

198

8. Experimental philosophy leads to the

5. Privileg'd things what? ib.

christian religion in particular. 248

6. The imperfection of the human mind. . 9. Different kinds of experience. 249

ib.

10. Personal.

ib.

7. After what manner human reason

II. Historical.

ib.

a Els.

12. And theological or supernatural, ib.

8. Whether men may, with justice, dif- 13. We ought to believe several things

course of things above rcafon? 204

upon the information of experience,

mediate and immediate, which with

SECT. II.

out that information, we should judge

unfit to be credited; or antecedently

9. Rules for judging of things above

to it, actually judged contrary to rea-

reason.

10. The first rule.

ib.

son.

250

14. We ought to have a great and par-

11. A second rule.

213

12. A third rule for judging of things

ticular regard to those things that are

above reafon.

recommended to our belief, by what

214

we reduce to real, tho' supernatural

13. A fourth rule.

experience.

14. Reafon what?

218

253

15. A fifth rule.

16. The sixth and last rule for judg-

The high veneration man's in-

ing of things above reason.

tellect owes to God.

225

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The christian virtuoso.

í.

religion, in general. 239

2. By discovering the existence of God.

Experimental

philofophy leads to 7. In the mutual fefulness of his

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