History of English Thought in the Eighteenth Century, Том 1

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Smith Elder, 1902 - 469 стор.
 

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Further statement of theory
53
Dissolution of the old bonds
54
Reconstructive process
55
Final sceptical position
56
The resulting empiricism
57
CoMMON SENSE AND MATERIALISM 59 Opposition to scepticism in England
59
CHAPTER II
74
Authority and reason
75
Protestant rationalism
76
Rational theology
79
Christianity and philosophy
81
CHAPTER III
82
sectiox 60 The commonsense view 60
83
Christianity and Deism
85
Limits of toleration
88
The decline of Deism
89
Lockes theology
94
The essence of Christianity
95
The terms of salvation
96
The need of a revelation
97
Locke the typical latitudi narian
100
His view of the mysteries
101
His miscellaneous works
102
Tolands philosophy
106
Excision of mystery
107
Application to Christianity
109
Ambiguous result
110
Locke and Stillingfleet
111
Norris and Brownes replies to Toland
112
Brownes position
114
His agnosticism
115
Metaphor and analogy
116
Browne and Berkeley
117
Tolands problem unsolved
118
CLARRE AND Wollaston 26 Samuel Clarke
119
Clarkes philosophy
120
Demonstrable theology
121
section Page 31 Theology and morality
123
Is revelation needed ?
124
Is a future state demonstrable?
125
A revelation needed
126
But not necessary
127
Ambiguous results
128
Clarkes position and influence
129
William Wollaston
130
Need of a future life
132
TINDAL AND HIs OPPoNENTs 43 Matthew Tindal
134
Creation
135
Force of his argument
137
Morality the essence of religion
138
Attack on revelation
139
Tindal and Clarke
141
Christianity and progress
143
Tindals position
144
Tindals opponents
145
James Fosters reply to Tindal
146
His rationalism
147
The use of revelation
148
John Conybeares reply to Tindal
149
Latitudinarianism
151
The use of revelation
152
SECTION pAge 61 John Lelands reply to Tindal
153
God and the British Constitu tion
155
William Laws reply to Tindal
157
Law attacks the law of nature
158
And the rationalist principle
159
Scepticism and authority
161
BUTLERS ANALOGY
162
W THE DECAY of DEIsM 67 Thomas Chubb
163
General tendency
164
Freewill 121
165
Thomas Morgan
166
Historical theory
167
His position
168
Sceptical conclusion
169
Disappearance of Deism
170
Henry Dodwell
172
Growth of criticism
173
His conclusion
174
His professed mysticism
175
Replies to Dodwell
176
His virulence
178
His confused method
179
His theological basis
180
Atheists and divines
181
Warburtons reply
182
Sceptical result
183
spectiox PAGE 19 Rise of criticism
189
LESLIEs SHORT METHod 10 Charles Blount
194
The Short and Easy Method
195
Leslies Four Rules
196
Allegories
202
Direction of assault
203
Collins and Bentley
204
Aim of the book
216
Replies to Collins
217
Chandlers replies to Collins
218
Nature of the argument
221
His general weakness
222
The argument upon Daniel
223
Conclusion of Chandler
224
Sherlocks Six Discourses
225
Sykess reply to Collins
226
Newtons Dissertations
227
W THE ARGUMENT FROM MIRACLEs 45 Miracles allegorised
228
48
232
233
233
Mystical interpretation Replies to Woolston secTIox pAgre 50 Smalbrokes reply
234
Smalbrokes incapacity
236
Weakness of both sides
237
Changed character of contro versy
238
Zachary Pearce
239
His argument against Woolston
241
Sherlocks Trial of the Wit nesses
242
Plan of the book
243
Sherlocks argument
245
Peter Annet
247
West on the Resurrection
248
Lyttelton on St Paul
250
His brutality and force
251
Position of the argument
252
WI THE HIStorical ARGUMENT 66 Conyers Middleton
253
His Letter from Rome
255
Nature of argument
256
Waterlands reply to Tindal
257
His brutal theology
258
Waterland and Voltaire
259
Waterlands theory
261
Middleton on verbal inspira tion
263
Middletons Free Enquiry
264
Attack upon the Fathers
265
His critical spirit
266
Application of his rules 197
268
Force of Middletons argument
269
Development of the contro versy
270
Logical position reached
271
Typical thinkers
273
Note upon Collinss Discourse of Freethinking
274
Ontology and revelation 122
283
section PAGE SECTION PAGE 1 Butlers life and character 278 14 The deification of conscience
293
General character of the 15 The probationary state
294
Analogy 279 16 Butler and evolution
295
The relation to previous con 17 The waste of nature
296
troversy 281 18 Necessity and fatalism
297
The fundamental assumption 282 19 Butlers solution of the diffi 5 Clarke Collins and Dodwell culty
298
on the soul 283 20 Its inadequacy
299
Collinss reply to Clarke 284 21 His final position
300
Butlers adoption of Clarkes 22 The Analogy and atheism
301
argument 286 23 Butler on revealed religion
302
The doctrine of probability 286 24 Unsatisfactory method of his 9 God and nature 287 argument
303
The fundamental difficulty 288 25 Final position
304
A providential scheme 290 26 Weakness of his argument
305
The moral government of God 291 27 Its force
307
Humes theory of causation 50
316
Imperfect appreciation of 18 Final causes and evolution
324
Hume 309 19 Antiquity of argument
325
Neglect of his writings 310 20 Its contradiction of experi 3 Completeness of his arguments 311 ence
326
arguments 312 22 The universe imperfect
327
The a priori argument 312 23 The most probable hypo 6 The a posteriori arguments 313 thesis
328
Necessity of facing them 314 24 Conclusion of Dialogues
329
His view of the world 199
330
ral scheme 317 27 The ordinary reply
332
Their bearing on the ontologi 28 Humes conclusion
333
Humes reply to Descartes 318 30 The historical argument
334
gument 320 32 Origin of theism
336
Its two meanings 321 33 The argument from miracles
337
The first unsatisfactory 322 34 First mode of evasion
339
But not quite without effect 323 35 Second mode of evasion
340
The second meaning unsatis 36 Force of Humes argument
341
VOL I
343
Warburtons litigiousness
345
Specimens of Warburtons
351
Significance of his position 200
362
20
363
CHAPTER VIII
372
Scientific influences
379
ScIENCE AND REVELATION
389
say
397
PALEY AND HIS SCHOOL
405
Special instances
411
Force of his argument
417
His own views
423
Joseph Priestley
429
Gilbert Wakefield
441
The canon 201
444
His defects as an historian
447
His reply to Gibbon
457
Paines morality
463

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Сторінка 447 - If a man were called to fix the period in the history of the world during which the condition of the human race was most happy and prosperous, he would, without hesitation, name that which elapsed from the death of Domitian to the accession of Commodus.
Сторінка 213 - Butter and honey shall he eat, That he may know to refuse the evil, and choose the good. For before the child shall know to refuse the evil, and choose the good, The land that thou abhorrest shall be forsaken of both her kings.
Сторінка 219 - Behold, I will send you Elijah the prophet before the coming of the great and dreadful day of the Lord ; and he shall turn the heart of the fathers to the children, and the heart of the children to their fathers, lest I come and smite the earth with a curse.
Сторінка 318 - Nothing is demonstrable, unless the contrary implies a contradiction. Nothing, that is distinctly conceivable, implies a contradiction. Whatever we conceive as existent, we can also conceive as non-existent. There is no being, therefore, whose non-existence implies a contradiction.
Сторінка 176 - So that, upon the whole, we may conclude, that the Christian Religion not only was at first attended with miracles, but even at this day cannot be believed by any reasonable person without one. Mere reason is insufficient to convince us of its veracity : And whoever is moved by Faith to assent to it, is conscious of a continued miracle in his own person, which subverts all the principles of his understanding, and gives him a determination to believe what is most contrary to custom and experience.
Сторінка 76 - Take away this persecuting, burning, cursing, damning of men for not subscribing to the words of men as the words of God ; require of Christians only to believe Christ, and to call no man master but Him only...
Сторінка 337 - The whole is a riddle, an enigma, an inexplicable mystery. Doubt, uncertainty, suspense of judgment, appear the only result of our most accurate scrutiny concerning this subject.
Сторінка 46 - Let us fix our attention out of ourselves as much as possible, let us chase our imagination to the heavens or to the utmost limits of the universe: we never really advance a step beyond ourselves, nor can conceive any kind of existence but those perceptions which have appeared in that narrow compass.
Сторінка 460 - After the sermon was ended, I went into the garden, and as I was going down the garden steps (for I perfectly recollect the spot) I revolted at the recollection of what I had heard, and thought to myself that it was making God Almighty act like a passionate man, that killed his son, when he could not revenge himself any other way; and as I was sure a man would be hanged that did such a thing, I could not see for what purpose they preached such sermons.
Сторінка 199 - That an English writer of the time of Henry III. should have been able to put off on his countrymen as a compendium of pure English law a treatise of which the entire form and a third of the contents were directly borrowed from the Corpus Juris...

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