Зображення сторінки
PDF
ePub

198

[ocr errors][merged small]

REPORT OF THE COMMITTEE OF THE ARMY,
ON THE DEPRECIATION OF THE CURRENCY.

CONTINUED FROM PAGE 168.
PROVIDED, That the interest of said notes shall, if demanded,
be paid according to the same rule and proportion annually. And
to the intent that the current prices of the said four articles of
Corn, Beef, Sheep's Wool, and Sole Leather, at the several times
of payment herein mentioned, may be more easily ascertained ; and
in order that a just and equitable settlement, may be annually made
with this State's quota of the Continental army, in future for their
future services.
Be it further enacted, That

Richard Cranch, Esq. in the County of Suffolk,
Stephen Choate, Esq.

do. Essex,
Simon Stow, Esq.

do. Middlesex, Justin Ely, Esq.

do. Hampshire, John Turner, Esq.

do.

Plymouth,
Micah Blackwell, Esq. do. Barnstable,
James Williams, Esq.

do. Bristol,
Seth Washburn, Esq.

do.

Worcester,
Capt. Joshua Sewal,

do. York,
Mr. Thomas Child,

do.

Cumberland,
Thomas Rice, Esq.

do. Lincoln,
Asa Bemont, Esq.

do. Berkshire, Be, and they are hereby severally appointed to collect and keep a true account, according to the best of their judgments, of the prices of each of the aforesaid four articles, in their respective counties monthly, upon an average of the whole month, for every succeeding month during the term of eight years, from the first day of January in the present year, and they shall make a true report of the same into the Secretary's office, upon the last Tuesday in the month of August, and on the third Tuesday of the month of February, annually, during the eight years as aforesaid, which return shall be under oath testified by a Justice of the Peace for the same County, in the form following, viz.

the

A. D. 17 This certifies that A. B. personally appeared, the day above, and made solemn oath, that the within report, by him subscribed, is a just and true report of the current prices, of the several articles of Corn, Beef, Sheep's Wool, and Sole Leather, in the County of for the months of

upon an average of each month respectively (upon a medium taking the County to

SS.

day of

Before me,

gether) according to the best of his judgment, upon the best information he could obtain.

A. B. Justice peace for the County of And the Justices of the Superior Court as also the Committee of the General Court, who may be hereafter appointed to settle with the army for future service, shall have recourse to those reports, in order to assist them in their calculations.

And be it further enacted, That there be, and there is hereby granted, a tax of eight millions of pounds, to be levied on the polls and estates within this state, one million of which to be paid into the Treasury, on or before the twentieth day of December, in each of the years of our Lord 1780, 1781, 1782, 1783, 1784, 1785, 1786, 1787, each of the said millions to be levied according to such rules, and in such proportion as shall be agreed upon and ordered by the General Court, or assembly at their Sessions, in June, in each of the years aforesaid, respectively. And the sums so granted, shall be applied for the redemption of the aforesaid notes, which shall be issued by virtue of this act, and if any part of the said tax should remain after redeeming such notes, the remainder shall be applied to defray the necessary expenses of government.

TO BE CONTINUED.

FROM PERCY'S RELIQUES OF ANCIENT ENGLISH POETRY.

MY MIND TO ME A KINGDOM IS.
My minde to me a kingdome is ;

Such perfect joy therein I finde
As farre exceeds all earthly blisse,

That God or Nature hath assigade ;
Though much I want that most would have,
Yet still my mind forbids to crave.

Content I live, this is my stay ;

I seek no more than may suffice:
I presse to bear no haughtie sway ;

Look wbat I lack my minde supplies.
Lo! thus I triumph like a king,
Content with that my mind doth bring.

I see how plentie sursets oft,

And hastie clymbers soonest fall :
I see that such as sit aloft

Mishap doth threaten most of all:
These get with toile, and keep with feare :
Such pares my mind could never beare.

[merged small][merged small][ocr errors][ocr errors][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][ocr errors]
[ocr errors][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small]

The Royal Society was established at London by King Charles II. in the year 1662. The following Americans have, at different periods, been elected Fellows of the Society : Cotton Mather, Paul Dudley, John Winthrop, Benjamin Franklin, James Bowdoin, John Leverett and Nathaniel Bowditch, of Massachusetts ; John Winthrop, Fitz John Winthrop and David Humphreys, of Connecticut; James Morgan and David Rittenhouse, of Pennsylvania ; William Byrd and Silas Taylor, of Virginia; and David Hosack, of New York.

John Winthrop was the son of Gov. Winthrop. He arrived in Boston from England in October, 1635; was several years governor of Connecticut; died at Boston, April 5, 1676, in his 71st year.

Fitz John Winthrop, the first governor of Connecticut, was born in Ipswich, Mass. 1638. He died at Boston, Nov. 27, 1707, aged 69.

John Winthrop, was son of Adam Winthrop ; graduated at Harvard College in 1732 ; was a professor of mathematics and natural philosophy. He died May 3, 1779, in his 65th year.

John Leverett was grandson of governor Leverett ; graduated at Harvard College in 1680; was afterwards its President. He died May 3, 1724.

Cotton Mather, well known as the author of the Magnalia, was son of Dr. Increase Mather, was born in Boston, Feb. 12, 1663, graduated at Harvard College, 1678 ; died at Boston, Feb. 13, 1728, aged 65 years. His publications amounted to 382, besides several large works left prepared for the press.

Paul Dudley, chief justice of Massachusetts, graduated at Harvard College 1690; died at Roxbury, Jan. 21, 1751.

David Rittenhouse, was born in Germantown, Penn. April 8, 1732; died June 26, 1796, in his 65th year.

James Bowdoin, governor of Massachusetts, was born in Boston,

Aug. 18, 1727 ; graduated at Harvard College in 1745; died Nov. 6, 1790, in his 64th year.

Benjamin Franklin was born in Boston, Jan. 17, 1706; died April 17, 1790, aged 84.

[ocr errors][ocr errors][merged small][ocr errors]
[merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][ocr errors][merged small]

"LETTER FROM COL. PAUL REVERE.

Boston, Jan. 1, 1798. In the fall of 1774 and winter of 1775, I was one of upwards of thirty, chiefly mechanics, who formed ourselves into a committee for the purpose of watching the movements of the British soldiers, and gaining every intelligence of the movements of the tories. We held our meetings at the Green Dragon tavern. We were so careful that our meetings should be kept secret, that every time we met, every person swore upon the bible, that they would not discover any of our transactions, but to Messrs. Hancock, Adams, Doctors Warren, Church, and one or two more.

About November, when things began to grow serious, a gentleman who had connections with the tory party, but was a whig at heart, acquainted me, that our meetings were discovered, and mentioned the identical words that were spoken among us the night before. We did not then distrust Dr. Church, but supposed it must be some one among us. We removed to another place, which we thought was more secure; but here we found that all our transactions were communicated to Governor Gage. (This came to me through the then Secretary Flucker; he told it to the gentleman mentioned above.) It was then a common opinion, that there was a traitor in the Provincial Congress, and that Gage was possessed of all their secrets. (Church was a member of that Congress for Boston.) In the winter, towards the spring, we frequently took turns, two and two, to watch the soldiers, by patroling the streets all night. The Saturday night preceding the 19th of April, about 12 o'clock at night, the boats belonging to the transports were all launched, and carried under the sterns of the men of war. (They had been previously hauled up and repaired.) We likewise found that the grenadiers and light infantry were all taken off duty.

From these movements, we expected something serious was to be transacted. On Tuesday evening, the 18th, it was observed, that a number of soldiers were marching towards the bottom of the Common. About 10 o'clock, Dr. Warren sent in great haste for

[ocr errors]
« НазадПродовжити »