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PAGE.

41

PAGE
Paper, invention of
174 Revolutionary relic,

134
Parishes or precincts, how distin- Rowlandson, Mrs.

280
guished from religious societies, 110 her captivity,

163
Pilgrims, noble character of 112 Royal Society, members of 201
landing of them,
169 Rittenhouse, David

201
Pequods,
131 Revere, Col. Paul

202
Pawkunnawkuts,
131 136 Russell, minister of

212
Pawtuckets,
131 Rose, a British war ship,

354
Penidooks,
132 329 Rugg, Amos W.

379 380
Packachoag,
132 Robbins, Roger

379
Philip's war,
133 282 Shoshanim,

383
Plague among the Indians, 137 140 Sheridan, anecdote of

303
Patukset, or Plimouth,
137 St. Sebastians, attack on

11
Pokanoket,

138 Sea and its inhabitants,
Peçksuot,

143 Steam and Gunpowder, relative
Philip,treatment of by the English, 161 effects of

60
summoned to Boston and Pli- Swift river,

89
mouth,
162 Souhegan river,

89
flies to arms,
162 Sudbury river,

89
goes to Albany,
162 Still river,

89
Prescott, Dr.
204 Shawl manufactory,

91
Posts in England,
242 South America, travels in

97
Puckataugh, Peter
273 Senators, number of

110
Prescott, Jonathan
274 Societies, religious

111
Prentice, John
275 Salem, settlement of

112
Paine, Robert Treat, notice of 308 Samoset,

138
Post office receipts in the County, 319 Smith, Capt. Joha

138
Plague at Marseilles,
349 Sowams,

138
Phenis, British ship of war, 354 Standish, Capt. Miles

139
Popkin, John (see currency)

Steele, Thomas

306
Powhattan, present to
365 Soldier's Funeral,

158
Putnam, George
379 Sausaman, John

162
Quincy, Josiah, letters to
76 Stone, Dea. John

282
Quinepoxet river,
89 St. Lawrence,

178
Quaboag,

131 Saunders, Sir Edmund, life of 366
Quinsigamond river,
90 Sherman, Roger, notice of

264
Quineboag river,
90 Sterling, history of

272 377
Quadequinah,

139 land purchased of the Indians, 272
Quonnopin,
284 Sholan,

272 273
Quebec, view of

177 formerly belonged to Lancaster, 272
its situation,
177 boundaries,

313
for what memorable,
178 Washacum pond, extent of

313
siege of
179 Wickapekiti hill and brook,

315
Quitam, Nicholas, meditations of 245 Streams in

315
Ripley, Gen.

188 Hills and face of the country,315 316
Ramble among the White moun- Mills and manufactures, 317
tains,
1 Manufacture of hats,

377
Robbins, Lt. Jonathan
24 of chairs,

378
Ross, Capt. voyage of
41 of scythe snaiths,

378
Ralle, residence of
53 194 of shoes,

378
Rivers, in the County of Worces- public houses,

379
ter,

88

private houses, number of 379
Raleigh, Sir Walter, stanzas of 95 number of schools,

381
Representatives to Congress, 110 Tyng, Col.

25
Roxbury, settled,

112 Towns, peculiar to New England, 35
Religion, state of in England, 114 Terrey, Kartial, cruelty of
Robinson, Capt. Andrew 121 Trenton falls,

46
Ryswick, peace of
163 'Turkey brook,

90

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84

PAGE.

108

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Tatnuck river,
90 Whitney, Rev. Mr. Peter

35
Thames river,

108 Wyoming, destruction of 37 82
Tax, County
110 Wheelock, President of

39
Toleration,
114 115 West Canada Creek,

46
Templeton, topographical view of 116 Wachusett mountain,

87
Trout brook,
117 Ware river,

88
Trilees, Indian
130 Wigwam hill,

90
Tisquantum,

138 West river,
Telescope, invention of
173 Watertown, settled,

112
Treasury, public
192 Winthrop, Gov.

113
Treasures of the deep,
236 Worcester, grant of

130 162
Tohanto, George

273
depopulated,

193
Titles,
348 War, Indian

130
Traps, Indian
375 Wampanoags,

131 136
Thomas, Capt. expedition of
355 Waeuntug,

132
Tupper, Commodore
353 Weshakim,

132 383
Town Bounties, (see currency)

Winslow, Edward

139
Tobacco, virtues of
364 | Wittuwamet,

143
bad properties of
364 Weimar, account of

145
Thomas, Moses G.
379 380 Williams, Roger

144
Utrecht, peace of
193 Wamsitta,

144
Unkachewalwick pond, 274 Wauch, Mansie, autobiography of 150
Union of the Pacific and Atlantic Wadsworth,

284
Oceans,
297 Wolf, Gen.

178
Visit in Canada, 49 65 102 177 Woman's worth,

183
Vegetables, structure of
344 Washburn, Seth

198
Wyman, Ensign
22 Winthrop, John

201
Wahwa,
22 Warren, Dr. Joseph

202
Woods, Jonathan, Ensign 26 Whaley, the regicide,

208
Woods, Daniel
26 Wilder, Jonathan

273
Worcester, general history of the Wiser, James

273
county of
33 Wilder, Nathaniel

273
Worcester County, extent and Wilder, James

275
boundaries of
86 Washington,

353
face of the country,

86 William Henry, fortress of 360
lakes and rivers,
87 108) Waite, Josiah K.

379

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WORCESTER MAGAZINE

AND

Thistorical Journal,

MISOELLANEOUS,

ORIGINAL.

A RAMBLE AMONG THE WHITE MOUNTAINS. From the period of the first settlement of New England down to the present time, the giant heights then called the “Crystal Hills," and since denominated the White Mountains, have attracted tbe altention, and tempted the visits of many a curious and inquisitive traveller. They have now become the resort of the idle wanderers who pursue pleasure even on their barred summits, or of the scientific enquirers, who explore their rocky sides with unbounded industry, who consider themselves happy, and their toils rewarded, if, perchance, they discover some quaint moss or obscure lichen, invisible to common observers and unknown to former learnej strollers. The crowds of visitors of the colossal piles, plunder nothing but a few perishing flowers, withered grasses, or mineral fragments : they leave to every new climber, the severe labors of ascending, the sublime views from the summits, and all the novelty and grandeur of mountain scenery.

The White Mountains are indeed most interesting objects. Standing as they do in a rude and wild region, not remarkable for towering elevations, they are distinguished for their lofty height. Mount Washington, the tallest of the brothers, is said to exceed in altitude, tbe Alleghanies of the South, and the Green Mountains of the North, by nearly 2,500 feet. He eren rises above the more celebrated peaks of other more romantic lands: Olympus, connected as he is with so many classic recollections, is only of equal stature. Ben Nevis, the most elevated land in the island of Great Britain, and Snowdon, the king of the Welsh Hills, are lower by more than 2,000 feet.

It was in the pleasant season of spring, that the writer, in company with an intelligent friend, set forth on the excursion which bas furnished the materials for the narrative in the following pages. "Believing that every speck of the soil of our country is ioteresting to its inhabitants, he is induced to suppose, that the description of the most massive of its piles of earth and stone, will be amusing to some.

does not,

Our journey had been along the Eastern side of the range, and upon the banks of the rapid, but beautiful stream of the Androscoggin. This noble river, issuing from a series of solitary lakes, embosomed in the forest, and dignified with Indian names, almost as formidable as the red warriors themselves, pours westward seeking an outlet among the ridges of hills that encompass it about.At length, it does escape through an opening in the mountain barrier, and rushes through the vallies at its base, with a hurried motion, as if the favorable opportunity might be lost by any delay ; but after journeying to the South for a few miles, it is again obstructed by an opposing ridge, and wanders on to the East, in quest of a channel to convey its waters to the sea. however, take the direct course to the ocean, until it has traversed fifty miles between parallel hills, of so firm structure as to resist every attempt of their prisoner to break from its confinement.-Then it goes on with a clear and tranquil motion, scattering fertility along its banks, till it meets with other obstructions. At Rumford a precipice is stretched across the bed of the waters : They are not precipitated in one broad sheet from its edge, but tumbling from cliff to cliff are dashed into foam. The spray, tinged with all the bright colors of the rainbow, rises from their commotion and is painted by the sun-beams. The thunder of this miniature cataract is heard from a distance, and the earth, either in reality or imagination, trembles with the heavy falling. The descent is estimated at seventy feet. After dashing over the rock, the river spreads out in a broad basin, and seems resting to recover power before it rushes over a second ledge, which opposes its passage about a fourth of a mile below. It leaps over this smaller bar, and frets along another quarter of a mile, and again pluoges down a declivity, about fifteen feet in height. An island at the foot of the last rapid, covered with fair trees, rests placidly amid the uproar, as if smiling on the turmoil around it. The snowy whiteness of the stream is beautifully contrasted with the green and waving foliage. All the difficulties are not yet surmounted. The Pejypscot rocks sturdily spread themselves across the path, and

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