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In this, Geo. IV. has in “holy ways" and Geo. III. after “eternal life" interpolates : "that in this World He may crown You with Success and Honour and when You have finished " &c. Both alterations are continued in later orders.

This form is a combination of the two forms in Liber regalis, one Coronet te Deus and the other Confortare et esto, originally an anthem. Both begin with the same words as in Liber regalis and the Stewart orders, but are different afterwards.

In Liber regalis and the Stewart orders a prayer Deus perpetuitatis was said between Coronet te Deus and Confortare. "It was omitted in W. and M. and does not appear again.

In Jac. II.* there are two forms differing somewhat from those in Liber regalis and the Stewart orders, but more like them than the forrn in W. and M. They run thus :

God crown thee with a Crown of Fortitude, and Honour, of Righteousness, and Glory : that having a right Faith, and abounding in all the Fruits of Good Works, thou mayst at last Obtain the Crown of an Everlasting Kingdome, by (whose erased] his Gift, whose Kingdome endureth for ever. Amen.

“O Eternal God, King of Kings Fountain of All Auctority, and power ; Bless we beseech thee this [these two words interlined] thy Servant, who in lowly Devotion boweth his head un (interlined] to thy Diwine Majestie.

“ The King must here be put in mind to do so.

“Let him allwais in Godly Devotion wait upon thee ; and be thou ever present with him, preserve him long in health, and prosperity ; protect, and Defend him from all evill; prevent him with the blessings of goodness ; and Crown him with thine Everlasting mercy, through Christ Our L^. Amen.”

Praise the Lord] This anthem continues from W. and M. to Geo. III. The Stewart orders and Geo. IV. and succeeding orders have Deus in virtute “The king shall rejoice in thy strength O Lord.”

As soon as the King] This rubric continues unchanged till Geo. II. where it is : As soon as the King is crowned, the Peers &c. put on their Coronets and Caps. It remains here till Victoria, when it disappears from this place.

Cap. 13. The presenting of the Holy Bible.
This is an entirely new ceremony:
The rubric remains substantially the same in the later orders as in W. and M.

In Anne and all the later orders the substance of the address remains unaltered to Geo. III. But with Geo. IV. and following orders the first fourteen lines are omitted and the address begins: “Our Gracious King; we present unto Your Majesty this Book&c. (last line of p. 27.) and it continues much the same in Wm. IV. and Victoria.

Geo. II. and the following orders have this rubric after the delivery of the bible.

Then the King delivers back the Bible to the Archbishop, who gives it to the Dean of Westminster, to be reverently placed again upon the Holy Altar.

Victoria adds to the rubric: the Archbishops and Bishops who had assisted returning to their Seats.

Cap. 14. The Benediction and Te Deum. The pric remains the same in the lat orders with some few verbal alterations.

The first section of the blessing remains the same, until Geo. III. and the later orders when the last three lines, after “evil thing” are changed into “and prosper you in everything good. Amen."

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In the second section of Geo. II. there is “Victorious Fleets and Armies " in place of “victorious armies."

The second section of the blessing in Geo. III. is : The Lord give you a fruitful Country and healthful Seasons ; victorious Fleets and Armies, and a quiet Empire ; a faithful Senate, wise and upright Counsellors and Magistrates, a loyal Nobility, and a dutiful Gentry ; a pious and learned and useful Clergy; an honest, industrious, and obedient Commonalty. Amen.

In Geo. IV. Wm. IV. and Victoria, the second section is :

“The Lord give you a faithful Senate, wise and upright Counsellors” and so on as in Geo. III.

The third section remains the same till Geo. II. when the second sentence becomes : “May Mercy and Truth meet together and Righteousness and Peace kiss each other.” In Geo. III. and the later orders it begins thus :

" In your days may Mercy and Truth meet together, and Righteousness and Peace kiss each other” and then it ends as in W. and M.

The fourth section remains the same till Geo. III. when it becomes :

“The Lord make your Days many, and your Reign prosperous : may you be reverenced and beloved by all your Subjects, and ever increase in Favour with God and man. Amen."

In Geo. IV. Wm. IV. and Victoria after “prosperous” is added “your Fleets and Armies victorious.”

The fifth section remains the same until Geo. III. when it is broken up into two; and reads thus :

“The glorious Majesty of the Lord our God be upon you : may he bless you with all temporal and spiritual Happiness in this world, and crown you with Glory and Immortality in the world to come. Amen.

“The Lord give you a religious and virtuous Posterity to rule these Kingdoms in all Ages. Amen.

Thus it remains in Geo. IV. but in Wm. IV. and Victoria the last section, the prayer for posterity, is wholly omitted.

This long blessing is descended from the episcopal blessing of Liber regalis, a version of which appears in Jac. I. with three sections. In Car. I, and II. there is a short blessing, followed by a prayer for the clergy, inspired by the second section of the blessing of Liber regalis and Jac. I. In Jac. II. we have the blessing which was doubtless the immediate ancestor of that in W. and M. though the opening clauses are not the same. They run thus in Jac. II.* :

“The Lord bless thee, and keep thee : And may all the Blessings of Heaven, & Earth, plentifully descend upon thee. Amen.

“The Lord give thee of the dew of Heaven.” And so on as in W. and M.

Then the Archbishop] This rubric and the prayer following remain with a few verbal alterations after Geo. III. in all the orders.

The blessing being thus given] This rubric persists till Geo. IV. but in Wm. IV. and Victoria it disappears entirely. This is another of those deviations from antiquity which characterise these two orders.

Then the Quire] This rubric remains with a few changes up to Wm. IV. But in Victoria it is in this form :

Then the Choir begins to sing the Te Deum, and the Queen goes to the Chair on which Her Majesty first sate on the East Side of the Throne, the two Bishops Her Supporters, the Great Officers, and other Peers, attending Her, every one in his place, the two + Swords being carried before Her, and there reposes Herself.

The text of Te Deum first appears in Geo. II. and thence in all later orders.

Cap. 15. The Inthronization. The rubric remains as in W. and M. until Victoria when the beginning is changed into : The Te Deum being ended, the Queen will ascend the Theatre, and be lifted up into Her Throne, &c. The rest as in W. and M. with the needful changes.

The exhortation remains the same in all, except that “God's altars” is changed into “God's Altar” in Geo. II. and succeeding orders. The plural is used in the Liber regalis, the singular in the Stewart orders. Geo. II. and later orders leave out : “and to wait there.”

In Jac. II. the opening runs : Stand firm and hold fast from henceforth that Place of Royal Dignity, whereof Thou art the Lawful and Undoubted Heir, by Succession from Thy Forefathers &c.

In Car. I. and Jac. I. the expressions are much less strong : “Stand and hold fast from henceforth that place whereof hitherto thou hast been heir by the succession of thy fore-fathers,” which is almost word for word a translation of Liber regalis. The changes in Jac. II, represent opinions current in his time and in W. and M. the words have been modified, just as they were modified in the Recognition. (See p. 16. above.)

In Geo. IV.* : “A loud and general acclamation of God save the King !' accompanied by clapping of hands and huzzaing now burst from every part of the Abbey."

Cap. 16. The Homage. This rubric remains the same in all the orders excepting that in Geo. II. and following orders the words concerning the pardon are left out.

The Archbishop] This rubric remains unchanged in the later orders.
There was a similar rubric in the Stewart orders.

The Archbishops and Bishops gave their oath of fealty to the King in Car. II. Geo. IV.* and Wm. IV.* before the Dukes of the blood royal did their homage. But, though the order in Anne is that the first estate shall do homage before the second estate, yet it would seem that Prince George of Denmark really performed his homage before the Archbishop of Canterbury. (London Gazette, No. 3804, April 23–27, 1702.)

The oath of fealty remains the same in all later orders.

In Geo. I., II. and III.“ Kings of England” is changed into “Kings of Great Britain” ; in Geo. IV. and Wm. IV. into “Kings of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland”; in Victoria into “Kings or Queens of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland.

The substance of the oath is the same in the Stewart orders. And then the Archbishop kisseth] In Anne this is changed to “the Queen's left cheek or hand.” So in Geo. I. and II. changing “Queen” into “King.” In Geo. III., IV. and Win. IV. it is "the King's left cheek” only. In Victoria “ the Queen's Hand.”

It is the left cheek in the Stewart orders.
After this the other Peers] This rubric is unaltered in the later orders.

In Car. II. the Duke of York did his homage after the bishops. In Anne, Prince George did his homage before them.

The homage of the temporal peers remains the same in all the later orders. There is a similar form in the Stewart orders.

Geo. II. and the later orders add after the homage this rubric :

Note, That Copies of this Homage must be provided by the Heralds for every Class of the Nobility.

The Peers having done their Homage] This rubric remains substantially the same in all later orders.

Caps and Coronets, thus including the spiritual peers, remain till Geo. III. and later orders, when Caps are left out.

In Anne the final words are : kisseth the Queen's cheek or hand. In Victoria kisseth the Queen's hand.

There is a similar rubric in Car. I. and II. a much shorter one in Jac. I.

While their Majesties' general Pardon] This rubric continues the same in Anne and Geo. I.

But in Geo. II. and later orders the rubric begins differently: While the Peers are thus doing their Homage and the Medals thrown about, the King, and so on, as in W. and M.

See above p. 133 for a note on the medals.

Cap. 17. The final Anthem.

This remains a separate chapter until Wm. IV. and Victoria when it becomes part of Cap. 16.

While the general pardon] This rubric remains the same until Geo. II. In Geo. II., III. and IV. mention of the general pardon is omitteil. In Wm. IV. the rubric is merely : At the same Time the Choir sing this Anthem; and in Victoria : During the performance of the Homage the Choir sing this anthem.

The anthem was slightly altered in Anne and remained thus until Geo. III. In Geo. IV. it is “Blessed be Thou Lord God of Israel.” (Chron. xxix. 10. 11. 12. 13.) In Wm. IV.“ O Lord grant the King a long life.” In Victoria : “This is the day which the Lord hath made.”

This anthem is a survival of the introit “Behold O God our defender” of Car. I. and II. and of Protector noster of the Liber regalis : for the celebration of the Eucharist in the Stewart orders and Liber regalis, when there was no Queen consort to be crowned, began at this place : always excepting Jac. II. when “there was no Communion.”

At the end of this Anthem] This rubric remains the same in Anne and Geo. I.

In Geo. II. and following orders there is added : The Solemnity of the King's Coronation being thus ended, the Archbishop leaves the King in His Throne, goes down to the Altar, and begins, &c.

In place of : At the end of this Anthem there is in Wm. IV.: When the Homage of the Lords is ended; and in Victoria : When the Homage is ended.

In Geo. II., III. and Wm. IV. the section for the coronation of the Queen Consort is inserted here. It has been printed by Mr. William Maskell, (Monumenta Ritualia Ecclesiae Anglicanae, Oxford, 1882, vol. ii. p. 149.) and it appears in this work as Appendix X. p. 117.

Cap. 18. The Communion.

The rubric continues thus until Geo. I. In Geo. II., III., IV., Wm. IV. and Victoria after Offertory begins the rubric is changed to the Archbishop reading these sentences “Let your light,” &c., followed by “Charge them."

In Geo. IV. and later, the singing of “Let my prayer” by the choir is discontinued.

In the mean while] This rubric persists to Geo. IV. and Wm. IV. when the anthem being discontinued, the words in the mean time are left out, but the substance of the rubric remains unchanged. In Victoria the first section of the rubric is this: The Queen descends from Her Throne, attended by Her Supporters, and assisted by the Lord Great Chamberlain, the Sword of State being carried before Her, and goes to the Steps of the Altar, where taking of Her Crown, which she delivers to the Lord Great Chamberlain to hold, She kneels down.

The remainder of the rubric is as in W. and M.

Bless O Lord we beseech] The prayer remains the same in all later orders.

“This weighty office” in W. and M. and Anne becomes in Geo. I. “his weighty office," and in like manner in the later orders.

Then the King and Queen kneeling] In substance it remains the same ; in place of a Mark weight of Gold, Victoria has a Purse of Gold ; after Geo. I. the eleven last words of the rubric are omitted. In Geo. II., III. and Wm. IV. where a queen consort was crowned a rubric follows : The Queen also at the same time maketh Her Oblation, in like manner as the King : After which the Archbishop says. Before Oblation Geo. III. and Wm. IV. have second.

O God who dwellest] See above p. 17. This prayer remains the same until Geo. III., when the final sentence “Accept we beseech thee" is changed into “through Jesus Christ Our only Mediator and Advocate.”

Then the King and Queen return] This rubric remains substantially the same until Victoria, which has: Then the Queen goes to Her Chair on the South Side of the Altar, and kneeling down at Her Fuldstool, the Archbishop saith.

The Long Exhortation is left out in all.

The proper preface varies somewhat in Anne, who after “nursing mothers” has “and especially this our gracious Queen, Defender of thy Faith and Protector," &c. So in Geo. I.

In Geo. II. after “ nursing mothers” there is “and hast particularly at this time given us thy Servant our Royal Sovereign King George to be the Defender of thy Faith, and the Protector of thy Church ; that under Him we may lead a quiet and peaceable life in all Godliness and Honesty : and together with Him hast raised up our Gracious Queen Caroline, to be a great Example and Encourager of true Religion and Piety among us : Therefore," &c.

In Geo. III. it is “Everlasting God Who makest Kings to be the Nursing Fathers of thy Church, and Queens her Nursing Mothers; who hast particularly at this time given us thy Servant our Sovereign King George to be the Defender of thy Faith, and the Protector of thy People ; and together with Him hast raised up our Gracious Queen Charlotte, to be a great Example and Encourager of true Religion and Piety among us : Therefore,” &c.

Geo. IV. has : "Everlasting God. Who hast at this time given us thy Servant our Sovereign King George to be the Defender of thy Faith, and the Protector of thy_People. Therefore,” &c.

Wm. IV. has : “Everlasting God : Who hast at this time given us thy Servant our Sovereign King William to be the Defender of thy Faith, and the Protector of thy People ; and together with Him hast raised up our gracious Queen Adelaide, to be a great Example and Encourager of true Religion and Piety among us. *Therefore," &c.

Victoria has : “Everlasting God : Who hast at this time given us thy Servant our Sovereign Queen Victoria to be the Defender of thy Faith, and the Protector of thy People ; that under Her we may lead a quiet and peaceable life in all Godliness and Honesty. Therefore," &c.

When the ArchB'] This rubric remains the same in Anne with the needful verbal alterations, only accompanied with a note, “The preacher and those who read the Epistle and Gospel to receive." In Geo. I. the rubric is expanded as follows : When the Archbishop the Dean of West

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