The Cambridge History of China: Volume 1, The Ch'in and Han Empires, 221 BC-AD 220

Передня обкладинка
Denis Twitchett, Michael Loewe, John K. Fairbank
Cambridge University Press, 26 груд. 1986 р. - 1024 стор.
This volume begins the historical coverage of The Cambridge History of China with the establishment of the Ch'in empire in 221 BC and ends with the abdication of the last Han emperor in AD 220. Spanning four centuries, this period witnessed major evolutionary changes in almost every aspect of China's development, being particularly notable for the emergence and growth of a centralized administration and imperial government. Leading historians from Asia, Europe, and America have contributed chapters that convey a realistic impression of significant political, economic, intellectual, religious, and social developments, and of the contacts that the Chinese made with other peoples at this time. As the book is intended for the general reader as well as the specialist, technical details are given in both Chinese terms and English equivalents. References lead to primary sources and their translations and to secondary writings in European languages as well as Chinese and Japanese.
 

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Зміст

The state and empire of Chin
1
The structure and practice of government
7
The concept of sovereignty
13
The state and empire of Chin
20
Preimperial China ca 250 B C page
39
The Chin empire
41
The Former Han dynasty
103
The founding of the dynasty 210195 BC
110
Marquisates of Former Han
477
The armed forces
479
Population and land subject to registration
485
The institutions of Later Han
491
The local administration
506
The army
512
Later Han regents
515
Conclusion
519

The Han empire 195 B C
125
The consolidation of the empire 195141 B C
128
Changan capital of Former Han
134
The Han empire 163 B C
138
Kingdoms in revolt 154 B C
142
The Han empire 143 B C
146
The full force of modernist policies 14187 B C
152
The Han empire 108 B C
166
The years of transition 8749 B C
179
The Han empire A D 2
194
Reform and decline 49 B C A D 6
198
Wang Mang the restoration of the Han dynasty
223
The reign of Wang Mang A D 923
232
The restoration of the Han dynasty
240
The population of China A D 2
241
The population of China A D 140
242
The Later Han dynasty
251
The Han empire A D 140
252
Genealogy of Later Han emperors
260
Loyang capital of Later Han
263
The conduct of government and the issues at stake
291
The reigns of Hoti Shangti and Anti A D 88125
297
The reign of Shunti A D 126144
305
The reign of Huanti A D 146168
311
The fall of Han
317
The reign of Lingti A D 168189
323
The collapse of dynastic power
341
Contending warlords ca A D 200
342
Tsao Tsaos last years
353
The fall of Han in perspective
357
Han foreign relations
377
The Hsiungnu
383
Imperial gifts to the Hsiungnu
397
The Western Regions
405
The Western Regions and the Silk Roads
406
The structure and practice of government
463
Provincial and local government
470
Population counts for select commanderies
472
The codes
525
The judicial process
531
Private law
541
Rural society and the development of agricultural
551
Registered population A D 2 to A D 146
596
Registered arable land A D 2 to A D 146
597
The salt and iron agencies A D 2
603
The economic and social history of Later Han
608
Tables
624
Social history
626
Family background of subjects with biographies in the HouHan shu
635
Official status of presumed relatives on county sponsor lists
641
The religious and intellectual background
649
Mythology
657
Mantic beliefs and practices
673
The universe and its order
683
Ethical principles and the organization of man
703
Immortality and services to the dead
715
The concept of sovereignty
726
Tung Chungshu
733
The views of Wang Chung and Wang Fu
739
The development of the Confucian schools
747
Confucian Legalist and Taoist thought in Later Han
766
Later Han
779
Emperors of Former Han xxxix
784
Descendants of Liu Pang 132
787
The breakdown of central authority
795
The value of Later Han thought
806
Popular Taoism at the end of the Han dynasty
815
The philosophical revival of the third century
826
Buddhist and Taoist gnosis
838
Buddhism under the southern and northern dynasties
846
Taoism under the southern and northern dynasties
860
Buddhism and Taoism under the Sui dynasty
868
Bibliography
879
Glossaryindex
921
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Про автора (1986)

Born in South Dakota, John King Fairbank attended local public schools for his early education. From there he went on first to Exeter, then the University of Wisconsin, and ultimately to Harvard, from which he received his B.A. degree summa cum laude in 1929. That year he traveled to Britain as a Rhodes Scholar. In 1932 he went to China as a teacher and after extensive travel there received his Ph.D. from Oxford University in 1936. Between 1941 and 1946, he was in government service---as a member of the Office of Strategic Services, as special assistant to the U.S. ambassador to China, and finally as director of the U.S. Information Service in China. Excepting those years, beginning in 1936, Fairbank spent his entire career at Harvard University, where he served in many positions, including Francis Lee Higginson Professor of History and director of Harvard's East Asian Research Center. Fairbank, who came to be considered one of the world's foremost authorities on modern Chinese history and Asian-West relations, was committed to reestablishing diplomatic and cultural relations with China. He was also committed to the idea that Americans had to become more conversant with Asian cultures and languages. In his leadership positions at Harvard and as president of the Association for Asian Studies and the American Historical Association, he sought to broaden the bases of expertise about Asia. At the same time, he wrote fluidly and accessibly, concentrating his work on the nineteenth century and emphasizing the relationship between China and the West. At the same time, his writings placed twentieth-century China within the context of a changed and changing global order. It was precisely this understanding that led him to emphasize the reestablishment of American links with China. More than anyone else, Fairbank helped create the modern fields of Chinese and Asian studies in America. His influence on American understanding of China and Asia has been profound.

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