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sionaries in former years continue to Trestrail. I think I shall like the influence the people. The priests of country here. First impressions at all Rome have sought in vain to convince events are favourable. There is no part of them that Rome is the true church. The the coast which we have passed to be compeople prefer to follow the teaching of pared to the country round Cameroons.” God's word.

The people here have given us a Very heartily indeed were the mis- most hearty welcome. Crowds of the sionaries welcoined on their arrival. The natives embraced Mr. and Mrs. Saker town was quite in commotion, the people immediately they arrived on the beach, flocking in crowds to see the brethren. and lined the way up to the house, where But Mr. Saker missed some, who during they have thronged us all the afternoon. his absence have passed away. One in

How much like home it was to hear the particular is mentioned a deacon of children sing some of our favourite the church, who for thirteen years has children's hymns, such as, “Here we consistently followed the Saviour. His suffer grief and pain,' &c., in beautiful name was Tondi. When he became a harmony." convert, he had to give up five or six of “You will be glad to hear that Mr. his wives. This he did cheerfully, giving Smith speaks very hopefully of the work them their freedom. His attendance at here. Some two months ago there was the daily meetings for prayer was very a baptism, and he expects another constant, and he often with great earnest- similar season before long. Depending ness appealed to those present to love on the might of God, we may expect, and and serve the Saviour. But if the aged shall assuredly have, a rich harvest in are passing away, there are many young Africa. How great is Africa's need! people giving indications of their desire

On our voyage here we passed immense to follow Christ. “Only a few days lengths of coast which represented an since,” says Mr. Robert Smith,“ Massie, almost unrealizable extent of country in a curly-headed girl, came into the room the interior, where all is the blackest weeping, and saying, Please, sir, my darkness with regard to the Gospel. heart he is too hard; he is wicked too Cannot England do more for Africa ? If much ; what shall I do?!" Such is the the Gospel is to penetrate to its centre, spirit of many.

if missionary fields are to be extended, It will be grateful to our readers to the missionary societies, or the Christians have a few extracts from a letter of whom they represent, must be prepared the Rev. Q. W. Thomson, in which he to set before themselves, with something describes their reception, and his feelings like unquenchable enthusiasm, the on entering the field of his labour. speedy evangelization of the whole of

6 Mr. Smith and Mr. Fuller soon Africa. If this is done, and we have the came on board and welcomed us most earnest prayer and effort of the churches heartily to the old home of Mr. and Mrs. of England and America for this end, Saker, but to the new one for myself. we need not doubt its attainment." Mr. Smith overflowed with gladness to It is certainly a sad reflection, that see Mr. Saker back again. For many although missionary stations exist in months he and Mr. Fuller have scarcely several places on the West Coast of known how to supply all the stations. Africa, and though probably a hundred The work has been too much for them. thousand of its people have become But they are thankful to testify that for Christians, the vast interior with its their special need God has given them manifold races is as yet unvisited by the special strength."

Christian inissionary. The faith of “From Clarence Cove, Fernando Po, Mohammed has for many years been we saw snow very distinctly upon the extending its influence over the Contipeak of the Cameroons Mountain. This nent, but Christians have as yet done but morning, as we passed close to the moun- little to communicate the knowledge of tain, the peak was hidden by a cloud, Christ. May the cry of the perishing come and we had a clear view of Mount up before the Lord of hosts and be heard

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GENERAL. The year of our Lord 1864 has closed in quiet. Little was it to be expected, when the year began, that the month of December would find England at peace with all the world; for, besides the clouds which rested over the Atlantic, and which can scarcely disappear so long as the great internal struggle continues to rage on the American Continent, European affairs, especially in connection with Denmark and Germany, presented the most threatening aspect, and the boldest politicians held their breath while they anticipated what might come. Happily, and by God's mercy, the danger was averted; England declared for peace; and the result has been that the conflict between Germany and Denmark is over,—not indeed without disaster to Denmark and disgrace to Germany —but without plunging Europe generally into war.

At home, things have beon quiet enough: no great question of internal politics has been settled or even discussed in Parliament; and we begin the new year, which dawns upon us to-day, with all the great problems which have been lately agitated still unsolved, though pressing for solution with an earnestness that thoughtful men cannot fail to recognize.

The great event of the month has been the re-election of Abraham Lincoln as President of the United States of America. The contest, which was really a contest between freedom and slavery, ended in a victory for the cause of freedom even grander than was expected; and for four years more Mr. Lincoln, “the friend of the slave,” is to be, if his life be spared, President of the States, and Commander-in-Chief of their vast armies. For what purposes Mr. Lincoln will use his power, his“ Message” sufficiently shows. He retracts nothing he has ever said about slavery, and will not modify the emancipation proclamation. On the contrary, he recommends Congress to pass an amendment to the Constitution abolishing slavery throughout the United States. As to the war, he feels confident that the North could continue for an indefinite period as far as regards men, while her material resources are inexhaustible. The door of amnesty is still open to the rebels ; but “slavery must die.” We wish we could see a prospect of the end of the

struggle; but if his motto is to be,“ Slavery must die,' who will not say,

“God bless Abraham Lincoln!”

We are sorry to say that a strange tale of persecution by the French authorities comes to us from the South Scas. In the Loyalty

group of the South Sea Islands, the missionaries of the London Missionary Society have laboured for nearly twenty years, and the Protestant religion has been generally accepted by the natives. A few years ago the Roman Catholic missionaries established stations there, and of course made every effort to convert the heretics to the true faith. To aid their proselytizing efforts they have now called in the aid of the sword. The French Governor of New Caledonia, in the month of June last, sent a detachment of French soldiers to take possession of the island of Lifu in the name of the French Government. Shortly afterwards, the Governor himself arrived in Lifu with 300 soldiers. Immediately after his arrival he forbade missionaries to conduct schools, and allowed his soldiers and the few Roman Catholic natives of the place to plunder the houses of the Protestants. When Mr. Macfarlane, the missionary, conducted service in his chapel, the place was surrounded by French soldiers, who made all the worshippers prisoners. On the latter attempting to escape, the soldiers fired upon them, and killed several. They stabbed a woman, who was hiding in the chapel, in six or seven places, and committed many similar atrocities. The native teachers and all the persons connected with the mission, except Mr. Macfarlane and family, were sent on board the vessels in irons, while the latter were made prisoners in their own house. The village was then burnt down, and the chapel used as a barrack. After the Governor thought he had sufficiently vindicated French authority, he invited the natives to rebuild their houses and become good French subjects. They would be allowed to profess any religion they liked, but none except Roman Catholics would bé allowed to assemble for worship. Of course the Governor's report of this affair will have quite a different colour ; but it is difficult to see how he can disguise the fact that he has behaved most cruelly to the poor people of the island, and most oppressively towards a British subject engaged in lawful missionary work. We shall be greatly surprised if the French Government maintains the acts of its officer when it receives the remonstrances which we presume will be addressed to it by Earl Russell.

Many of our readers will regret to hear that the Rev. C. J. Middleditch has resigned the Secretaryship of the Baptist Irish Society. On account of somewhat enfeebled health, he has deemed it right to accept an invitation to more retired labour in connection with the church at Blockley, in Worcestershire; and he has left the Irish Society amidst the

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regrets of the committee, but with their most cordial wishes for his health and usefulness. It is needless to say how much the Irish Society is indebted to Mr. Middleditch for its present position. Till the annual meetings in May, Mr. Trestrail will superintend the Society's affairs.

We are glad to find that the General Baptist Missionary Society has overcome the difficulty caused by its debt. At the winter conference of the churches of the Midland District, held at Derby on the 13th ult., the secretaries of the Society had the pleasure of announcing the gratifying fact, that the payments and promises for the removal of the debt of £1,600, respecting which so much anxiety had been felt, had now reached within less than £100 of the sum required; and that several of the churches, some of which are among the largest, had not yet reported their contributions. We congratulate the Society very

rdially on this happy issue, and trust that it usefulness will be continued, and even increased, during the coming year.

restored, presents a very neat and chaste appearance. The front is compoed and surmounted by a pointed cornice. The piers are of the rusticated pattern, and it may suffice to say that the other features in the front elevation have all been studied with due regard to architectural elegance and consistency. The total outlay was £227 14s.

LODGE-ROAD, BIRMINGHAM.—The recognition services of the Rev. W.F. Marchant, late of Mr. Spurgeon's College, as pastor of this church, were held on Tuesday, November 22nd. The chair was taken at three o'clock by the Rev. C. Vince, when, after devotional exercises by the Rev. S. Chapman, a very interesting meeting was held. Mr. J. Johnson, the secretary, read a short account of the rise of the church and the circumstances which led to the choice of Mr. Mar. chant. A very full and interesting statement was then made by Mr. Marchant, in which he referred to his conversion, and the causes of his adopting the ministry as his profession, &c. A very able charge was then delivered to the pastor by the Rev. D. Jones, B.A., of London. A tea meeting was held at half-past five o'clock, after which a public meeting was held at seven o'clock, the Rev. J.P. Barnett in the chair. Very interesting and comprehensive addresses were delivered after the devotional parts of the services, which were conducted by the Rev. W. S. Giles; by the Rev. C. Vince,

“ The relations of the church to the pas. tor;” and by the Rev. R. D. Wilson (Independent), on "The_relation of the church to the world." The Revs. T. M'Lean, of Harborne, W. Jackson, of Bilston, and J. Davies, also took part in the proceedings.

COTTENHAM, CAMBS.—A meeting of a very interesting character was held in the Old Baptist chapel in this village on Tuesday, November 22, to welcome the Rev. J. C. Wells, late of Houghton, Hunts, as pastor of the church. In the afternoon an eloquent and impressive sermon was preached by the Rev. #. B. Robinson, of. Soham, from Rev. i. 12, 13; after which about 200 friends partook of tea. In the evening & public meeting was held, G. Livett, Esq., of Cambridge, occupying the chair. The chairman presented to the pastor, in the name of the church and congregation, a purse containing £10, as a proof of the hearty welcome with which he was greeted. Addresses were then delivered by the Revs. T. A. Williams, Haddenham; J. S. Wyard, late pastor of Ebenezer Chapel, Cottenham; G. Sear, Histon; J. C. Wooster, Landbeach; and H. B. Robinson, Soham; and by the newlyelected pastor, who gave a clear and satisfactory statement of his conversion, and call to the ministry. The meeting was brought to a close by the choir, who had rendered efficient service during the evening.

DOMESTIC. DEAL.--The Baptist chapel, Deal, having been erected fifty y ears ago, had necessarily succumbed to the influence of time, and was getting ito a state of dilapidation. A meeting was called on the 23rd of June, at which the state of the chapel and the necessity of repairs having been discussed, it was resolved to repair the building, and improve its internal and external appearanee. The work having been brought to a close, it was arranged to celebrate the occasion with a series of Jubilee services. On Lord's-day, Nov. 13th, the Rev. C. Kirtland, of Canterbury, preached two appropriate sermons. On Tuesday evening, the 15th, a public social toa meeting was held in the schoolroom, when 230 sat down to tea. The tea over, and the room re-arranged, the public meeting was convened. On the platform, which was tastefully decorated, were the Revs. B. C. Etheridge, of Ramsgate; J. Crofts, of St. Peters; C. W. Skemp, of Eythorne ; J. J. Bartram (Congregationalist), and J. Palmer (Wesleyan), both of Deal ; Messrs. Waller and Browning. The Rev.W. Garwood, pastor, presided. Prayer having been offered, the chairman opened the business of the evening by reading from the church-book the preserved minutes of the opening services of the chapel, on the 26th October, 1814, at which were present the Revs. Dr. Rippon, of London; Giles, of Eythorne; Atwood, of Folkestone; and Cramp, of St. Peters. The other brethren followed. After each address a suitable hymn was sung, and a season of jubilant enjoyment was brought to a close, which will be long cherished in grateful remembrance. The chapel, now it has been

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RAMSEY, Hunts.-On Tuesday, November 29th, a new chapel was opened for public worship at the hamlet of Mereside, situated on the border of what was once the largest inland lake in England, Whittlesey Mere. At three o'clock, p.m., a discourse was delivered by the Rev. William Robinson, of Cambridge, from Deut. xxxü. 48–52. This was followed by a public tea, of which nearly 200 persons partook. Afterwards à crowded public meeting was held, under the presidency of the Rev. Å. Wylie, the new chapel being one of two yillage stations connected with the church under his pastorai care. Excellent addresses were delivered by the Revs. A. Murray, Peterborough; J. Lyon, Chatteris; G. Towler, Whittlesey; W. Robinson, Cambridge; G. B. Thomas, St. Neots; P. Tebbutt, Esq., Bluntisham. The collections of the day amounted to £23. The building is an exceedingly graceful little structure of the Gothic order; it combines elegance with economy, seating 200 worshippers, at a total cost of less than $300. Of this sum the greater part has been made up from the freewill offerings of the labouring poor of the hamlet and its vicinity, assisted by the wealthier members of the parent church, and friends at a distance.

EDINBURGH.-The Rev. C. H. Spurgeon preached on Sunday, November 27th, afternoon and evening, in the Music Hall, Edinburgh. Admission was free by ticket, and the collections were on behalf of the Duncanstreet, Newington, Baptist church (the Rev. Mr. Tulloch's), to aid in the payment of the cost of the place of worship they purchased, some time ago, from the Newington United Presbyterian congregation. The hall was greatly crowded at both services, and numbers of ticket-holders were excluded for want of room. Mr. Spurgeon preached in the afternoon from Hosea xiv. 5–7; and in the evening from Ezekiel xxxyi. 9. The audiences were privileged to hear two admirable discourses; they manifested marked attention, and were apparently much impressed. Mr. Spurgeon, at the conclusion of the evening service, bespoke the sympathy of friends in other denominations, for the congregation whose interests had brought him to Edinburgh. The collections" at the two services exceeded $150.

ILSLBY, BERKSHIRE.- Market Ilsley is a large village a few miles from the town of Newbury, Berkshire. There was only the parish church in this large and increasing village. The spiritual condition of the locality was brought under discussion at the annual meeting of the Berkshire Association of Baptist Churches held at Reading two years since, when it was determined to evangelize Ilsley, and several earnest-minded Christians agreed to preach out in the open air, and in cottages. These services were kept up with regularity and perseverance, under the super

intendence of the Rev. H. Fuller, of Ashampstead. God's blessing rested on the effort, and several persons were savingly converted. A few months ago a most suitable piece of ground offered, when it was determined to build a chapel, and on Tuesday, December 6th, opening services were held. Two excellent sermons were preached, that in the afternoon by the Rev. J. Aldis, of Reading, that in the evening by the Rev. W. T. Rosevear, of Abingdon. The Revs. P. G. Scorey, of Wokingham; T. Roberts, of Newbury; and R. Aikenhead, of Wantage, took part in the services. The chapel is a very pretty building, in a good situation, forming quite an ornament to the village. It will seat about 200, without a gallery. There is a baptistry and vestry all complete. The cost, including the purchase of the ground, is about £500. We believe about £200 has been raised. To defray the balance, an appeal is made to the religious public.

LUTON, BEDS.-On Wednesday evening, November 30th, an interesting service was held in Union Chapel, Luton, for the purpose of recognizing the Rev. T. R. Stevenson, late of Harlow, as pastor of the church and congregation. Upwards of 400 persons sat down to tea, and, in spite of most unseasonable weather, a large number of persons afterwards assembled in the chapel. The Rev. T. Hands, the senior minister in the town, presided. After an appropriate and admirable address from the chairman, Mr. Clarke, a deacon of the church, read a statement of the circumstances which had led to Mr. Stevenson's settlement; and Mr. Stevenson read a paper stating his views and intentions in entering on the pastorate of the church. The meeting was afterwards addressed by the Revs. D. Katterns, of Hackney; I. Preston, of Chesham; H. Áshbery, and D. F. Boston, B.A., of Luton; by Mr. Strange; and by Mr. Heaton, of London. Several neighbouring ministers were prevented from attending

MINISTERIAL CHANGES.--The Rev. E. Taylor recently resigned the pastorate of the church at Marlow. He has accepted an invitation to the pastorate of the church at Acton, which is at present (during the building of the new chapel) worshipping in the Independent chapel.--The Rev. William Cheetham, late of Tring, Herts, has accepted the cordial and unanimous invitation of the Baptist church, Briercliffe, Lancashire, and purposes entering upon his labours the first Sunday in the new year.- The Rev. R. Bayne, late of Langham, has accepted the unanimous and cordial invitation of the church at Rickmansworth, and enters upon his labours there on the first Sunday in the new year. - The Rev. J. Jenkinson (late of Oakham) has accepted a unanimous invitation to the pastorate of the Baptist church at Stanwick, near Higham Ferrers. Mr. Jenkinson's regrets of the committee, but with their most cordial wishes for his health and usefulness. It is needless to say how much the Irish Society is indebted to Mr. Middleditch for its present position. Till the annual meetings in May, Mr. Trestrail will superintend the Society's affairs.

We are glad to find that the General Baptist Missionary Society has overcome the difficulty caused by its debt. At the winter conference of the churches of the Midland District, held at Derby on the 13th ult., the secretaries of the Society had the pleasure of announcing the gratifying fact, that the payments and promises for the removal of the debt of £1,600, respecting which so much anxiety had been felt, had now reached within less than £100 of the sum required; and that several of the churches, some of which are among the largest, had not yet reported their contributions. We congratulate the Society very

rdially on this happy issue, and trust that it usefulness will be continued, and even increased, during the coming year.

DOMESTIC. DEAL.--The Baptist chapel, Deal, having been erected fifty years ago, had necessarily succumbed to the influence of time, and was getting into a state of dilapidation. A meeting was called on the 23rd of June, at which the state of the chapel and the necessity of repairs having been discussed, it was resolved to repair the building, and improve its internal and external appearanee.

The work having been brought to a close, it was arranged to celebrate the occasion with a series of Jubilee services. On Lord's-day, Nov. 13th, the Rev. C. Kirtland, of Canterbury, preached two appropriate sermons. On Tuesday evening, the 15th, a public social toa meeting was held in the schoolroom, when 230 sat down to tea. The tea over, and the room re-arranged, the public meeting was convened. On the platform, which was tastefully decorated, were the Revs. B. C. Etheridge, of Ramsgate; J. Crofts, of St. Peters;

C. W. Skemp, of Eythorne ; J.J. Bartram (Congregationalist), and J. Palmer (Wesleyan), both of Deal ; Messrs. Waller and Browning. The Rev.W.Garwood, pastor, presided. Prayer having been offered, the chairman opened the business of the evening by reading from the church-book the

préserved minutes of the opening services of the chapel, on the 26th October, 1814, at which were present the Revs. Dr. Rippon, of London; Giles, of Eythorne; Atwood, of Folkestone; and Cramp, of St. Peters. The other brethren followed. After each address a suitable hymn was sung, and a season of jubilant enjoyment was brought to a close, which will be long cherished in grateful remembrance. The chapel, now it has been

restored, presents a very neat and chaste appearance. The front is compoed and surmounted by a pointed cornice. The piers are of the rusticated pattern, and it may

suffice to say that the other features in the front elevation have all been studied with due regard to architectural elegance and consistency. The total outlay was £227 14s.

LODGE-ROAD, BIRMINGHAM.–The recog. nition services of the Rev. W.F. Marchant, late of Mr. Spurgeon's College, as pastor of this church, were held on Tuesday, November 22nd. The chair was taken at three o'clock by the Rev. C. Vince, when, after devotional exercises by the Rev. S. Chapman, a very interesting meeting was held. Mr. J. Johnson, the secretary, read a short account of the rise of the church and the circumstances which led to the choice of Mr. Marchant. A very full and interesting statement was then made by Mr. Marchant, in which he referred to his conversion, and the causes of his adopting the ministry as his profession, &c. A very able charge was then delivered to the pastor by the Rev. D. Jones, B.A., of London. A tea meeting was held at half-past five o'clock, after which a public meeting was held at seven o'clock, the Rev. J.P. Barnett in the chair. Very interesting and comprehensive addresses were delivered after the devotional parts of the services, which were conducted by the Rev. W. S. Gilés; by the Rev. C. Vince, on “ The relations of the church to the pastor;” and by the Rev. R. D. Wilson (Independent), on “The relation of the church to the world.” The Revs. T. M‘Lean, of Harborne, W. Jackson, of Bilston, and J. Davies, also took part in the proceedings.

COTTENHAM, CAMBS.-A meeting of a very interesting character was held in the old Baptist chapel in this village on Tuesday, November 22, to welcome the Rev. J. C. Wells, late of Houghton, Hunts, as pastor of the church. In the afternoon an eloquent and impressive sermon was preached by the Rev. H. B. Robinson, of Soham, from Rev. i. 12, 13; after which about 200 friends partook of tea. In the evening & public meeting was held, G. Livett, Esq., of Cambridge, occupying the chair. The chairman presented to the pastor, in the name of the church and congregation, a purse containing £10, as a proof of the hearty welcome with which he was greeted. Addresses were then delivered by the Revs. T. A. Williams, Haddenham; J. S. Wyard, late Ebenezer Chapel, Cottenham; G. Sear

, Histon; J. C. Wooster, Landbeach; and H. B. Robinson, Soham; and by the newlyelected pastor, who gave a clear and satisfactory statement of his conversion, and call to the ministry. The meeting was brought to : olose by the choir, who had rendered efficient service during the evening.

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