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ing-house that had lately been abandoned as he went on to state the reasons which in consequence of its age and ruinous con- had finally moved him to preach his faredition had stood a bout central to the well sermon to-day, and sketched, in a few inhabitants on the hill.

moving sentences, the peculiar trial of bis When the question of a new building soul during the weeks and months that was agitated, so much was said about the they had been wrangling among thembleakness of the old site that a division was selves in violation of both charity and created at the outset, one party determining justice. never to give up the hill, and the other "It was more than his poor flesh could soon becoming equally determined to locate bear," he said, "to be punisbed so for the new bouse elsewhere. The parishioners twenty years of labour among them, comwho resided on "the Flat" had the most forting their sick, burying their dead, and money and business ability, and these taking their converts to the blessed sacrahaving taken it into their heads that the ments. He could endure that they should meeting-house should be in their precinct, question his strength, doubt his capacity, half a mile from the hill, were likely, with call him an old man, and hint at bis having their advantages, to carry the day, to the outlived his usefulness; but that they should certain division of the church, that could set to and destroy the sheep and lambs that ill afford the loss of a tithe of its member. he had folded—that by their divisions and sbip.

unchristian disputes they should threaten With such feeling and such un-sabbath- to tear down what it had taken nearly a like talk the meeting-goers of Winton quarter of a century to build—he was not came up on that beautiful Sunday morning 80 vigorous as he once was, and it would to stand before the Lord. They met each kill him. They must 'spare him a little, other froin the opposite side of the hill that he might recover strength.' with cold nods, in some instances with He went on with his sermon, and the none;

and where a recognition in words proud, stubborn heads of his hearers, that was vouchsafed, the hearty, "How do you had turned this way or that, after the first do p” and “ Good morning,” were cur- surprise, to exchange glances of astonishtailed into a crusty “du,” or “mornin';" ment and sorrow, bowed down, one after and it was well that meeting began before another, like a bulrusb, till the whole any considerable assembly had collected, assembly assumed the look of humility, and or there would in all probability have been the women grew loud in their tears. They å set-to in the porch between the cham- could not consent to lose Pastor Seagraves. pions of the discordant parties.

He was a fixture in their hearts, and, to They went slowly into the meeting-room, many of the congregation, a childhood one after another, with hard updevout memory. He had preached the sermons faces, and, in too many cases, with a secret that had conveyed the first convictions of half-vindictive determination to give one sin to their consciences, and his counsels another a piece of their mind at noon. had guided them to peace. He had at

The minister stood before them-an old tended their bedside in sickness, and visited man, with a long blue cloak about his them in bereavement. He had married shoulders, and hair very grey. One must their sons and daughters, and buried their have been cursed with a more than ordinary dead. For a score of years the history of share of hardness or levity to be able to the church had been his history, and all look upon and not listen with respect to that during that length of time had hapPastor Seagraves. Where did he stand in pened to them of loss or gain bore in some the controversy of his parishioners ? As a way the impress of himself. Three beautipartisan, nowhere. For months be had ful grandchildren of one of his oldest church preached the Gospel and tried to make members called him, too, grandfather," peace, and now he had come to the con. and in the graveyard of the parish two of clusion that he must let them alone. The his offspring lay asleep, claiming kindred service proceeded, and anon he rose to name for ever with the people among whom fins his text-"Finally, brethren, farewell. Be died. No, they could not part with Father perfect, be of good comfort, be of one mind, Seagraves. And, without doubt, in all their live in peace; and the God of love and wrangling with one another most of the peace shall be with you.” The

congrega- Pastor's parishioners were utterly innocent tion, who had looked up with a start as he of any intention to grieve him, and thoughtread these words, listened with pale wonder less of any possible harm that their strife

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could bring to the fortunes or the feelings softened countenances that they shared in of their minister.

the expressed regrets.

the horrors of church discord and the calamity in vain for the superintendent: most of the of disunion in powerful and affecting lan- classes waited in vain for their teachers. guage, and closed with an affectionate but Word went round that there would be solemn warning to his people against as- no school that day, and the children suming the responsibility of such a dis- dispersed. Meantime a church-meeting union then. “BE OF ONE MIND, LIVE IN was called on the spot, and voted with PEACE!”

entire unanimity to request Pastor SeaHis formal resignation of the pastorate graves to recall his resignation. Now that followed, when, after commending them to some expression had been given to their the God of love and peace in a short and feelings the people breathed easier ; but, tender prayer, he pronounced the benedic- better still, the reviving effect of a single tion, and the congregation slowly wandered unanimous act on the part of the church, out of their seats with abstracted looks, as that but a few hours before had been ready if just waking out of a lethargy. The to fall to pieces of dissension, was such as weeping women clung around the good old made the old kindly blood start again in man, impeding his passage out of the house, hostile bosoms, and enabled bitter partisans and besought him, with piteous importu

to look each other in the face once more. nity, not to carry out his resolution to leave The pastor at first refused to reconsider them. The men assembled in knots in the his resignation. He was not accustomed to porch), very sober, and for a while very do things from impulse or for effect, and his quiet. It was evident enough that they act had been prayerfully considered and were all thinking about their pastor, and determined upon; but as days passed on, and feeling badly.. The new meeting-house brought him evidences of softened feeling could not be discussed to-day, if the signs in his people toward one another, he yielded told true, and certain young sons of Belial, to their entreaties to remain with them and who hung about the doorstep, grinding break the bread of life—not, however, until with malicious expectation of a quarrel he had exacted a solemn promise from them among the Christians," retired in disgust in formal assembly to drop the matter of when they found that nothing was likely to church building, till, in the fear and love of be talked about but the minister's farewell God, they could be one on that and every sermon. Conversation grow earnest, though other subject. He stayed with them five carried on in subdued tones, and all hostile years more, and gathered souls. Then the feeling was held in abeyance by the interest Master took him to bis rest. He lived to in a common grief. As the venerable pastor preach in a new edifice built by a united passed out, several men, including the people on the old hill, and to this day old deacons, greeted him with sad looks and an Christians who worship there weep as they unwonted warm grasp of the hand, and all point you to his grave, and tell of the good who stood by showed by their serious and he did in Winton.

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Gems from Golden Mimes

.

THE WORD OF GOD. THERE was a time when each revelation of the Word of God had an introduction into this earth which neither permitted men to doubt whence it came, nor wherefore it was sent. If, at the giving of each separate truth, a star was not lighted up in heaven, as at the birth of the Prince of Truth, there was done upon the i earth a wonder, to make her children listen to the

message of their Maker. The Almighty made bare his arm; and, through mighty acts shown by his holy servants, gave demonstration of his truth, and found for it a' sure place among the other matters of human knowledge and belief. But now the miracles of God have ceased, and nature, secure and unmolested, is no longer called on for testimonies to her Creator's voice. No burning bush draws the foot.

and bring forth ; meditating, I say, upon these mighty topics, our soul is smitten with grief and shame to remark how, in this latter day, she hath fallen from her high estate, and fallen along with her the great and noble character of men. Or if there be still a few names, as of the missionary Martza, to emulate the saints of old, how to the commonality of Christians her oracles have fallen into a household commonness, and her visits into a cheap familiarity; while by the multitude she is mistaken for a mioister of terror sent to oppress poor mortals with moping melancholy, and to a deadly office upon the happiness of human kind.- Edward Irving.

steps to his presence-chamber; no invisible voice holds the earth awake; no hand cometh forth from the obscure to write his purposes in letters of flame. The vision is shut up, and the testimony is sealed, and the Word of the Lord is ended; and this solitary volume, with its chapters and verses, is the sum total of all for which the chariot of heaven made so many visits to the earth, and the Son of God himself tabernacled and dwelt among us. The truth which it contains once dwelt undivulged in the bosom of God; and, on coming forth to take its place among things revealed, the heavens, and the earth, and nature through all her chambers, gave a reverent welcome. Beyond what it reveals, the mysteries of the future are unknown. To gain it acceptation and currency, the noble company of martyrs testified unto the death. The general assembly of the firstborn in heaven made it the day-star of their hopes and the pavilion of their peace. Its every sentence is charged with the power of God, and powerful to the everlasting salvation of souls. Being filled with these thoughts of the primeval divinity of revealed wisdom when she dwelt in the bosom of God, and was of his eternal self a part, long before he prepared the heavens or set a compass upon the face of the deep; revolving also how, by the space of 4,000 years, every faculty of mute Nature did solemn obeisance to this daughter of the Divine Mind, whenever he pleased to commission her forth to the help of mortals; and further meditating upon the delights she had of old with the sons of men, the height of heavenly temper to which she raised them, and the offspring of magnanimous deeds which these two--the wisdom of God and the soul of man--did engender

THE BLESSING OF ADVERSITY.

PROSPERITY is the blessing of the Old Testament; adversity is the blessing of the New, which carrieth the greater benediction and the clearer revelation of God's favour. Yet, even in the Old Testament, if you listen to David's harp, you shall hear as many hearse-like airs as carols; and the pencil of the Holy Ghost hath laboured more in describing the afflictions of Job than the felicities of Solomon. Prosperity is not witbout many fears and distastes and adversity is not without comforts and hopes. We see in needleworks and embroideries, it is more pleasing to have a lively work upon a sad and solemn ground, than to have a dark and melancholy work upon a lightsome ground : judge, therefore, of the pleasure of the heart by the pleasure

Certainly virtue is like precious odours, most fragrant when they are incensed, or crushed : for prosperity doth best discover vice, but adversity doth best discover virtue.-- Bacon.

of the eye.

Our Missions.

MISSIONARY WORK IN AGRA.

THE work of the mission in the city of Agra, in Northern India, has presented, during the past year, several very interesting circumstances. It is a very large city, and till the mutiny took place was the seat of government of the north-west provinces. That is now removed to Allahabad. There are, however, always staying at Agra a large number of British trcops, and this

secures the residence of an European popu. lation. The missionaries, the Rev. John Gregson and the Rev. D. P. Broadway, labour among both the European and native communities, and from both sections numerous converts bave been made. The pastor of the native church is John Ber. nard; but, with the missionaries, he devotes a large portion of his time to preaching among the heathen,

Bernard relates a very curious incident in his report, singularly illustrative of the silent yet uncertain way in which the influence of the Gospel penetrates the native community. We will give it in his own words :

" Dec. 18th. I went to the city in the morning, and after preaching, went to call upon a friend.

On my way I fell into conversation with a very respectable-looking pative. He was well dressed, and seemed to know me, though I did not know him. Our conversation turned upon religion, and he spoke much in praise of Christianity; and from his manner of speaking, I inferred that he was well educated, and acquainted with both the Persian and English languages. I said to him, "The chains of caste among you Hindus are very strong. When you burst these fetters, then you will be prepared to embrace the Christian religion.' He replied, “If you won't betray us, I will take you to our secret assembly.' I said, 'Very good.' He then led me along some narrow passages, which I had never before traversed, and, leaving me standing before the door of a house, he went inside. In a short time he came out and called me. After following him up some stairs he led me into a large room richly furnished with carpets, chandeliers, pictures, &c., &c. In the centre of the room was a long table, upon which various kinds of fruit and sweetmeats were spread out. There was also a decanter of spirits, with a wineglass. Seated around the table I counted eighteen natives, all dressed very respectably, and I knew some of them by their dress to occupy lucrative situations. On my entering, all rose to their feet, and in English wished me 'Good morning, and added, “Reverend sir, we esteem ourselves highly favoured by the visits of parties like yourselves, and are most happy to welcome you amongst us. They then gave me a chair to sit on, and one of them coming forward, poured a wine-glass full of spirits from the decanter and offered it me to drink. I replied, “I never drink spirits.? Then all were astonished, and began to look at one another with amazement; and the one who offered me the spirits said, This is a very strange thing. I have never known a Christian refuse to drink spirits, but we have always understood that it is a universal custom among Christians to drink spirits. I replied, 'A true Christian shuns such things. Upon this he was silent, and sat down, I then asked those

assembled if they belonged to Brahmo Somáj? They said, 'No, we all read the Bible ;' and added, "The foundation of Hinduism in Agra is shaken to its basis, and many have thrown off the chains of caste. They also told me that many meetings like this were held in Agra, and further said, 'We do not publicly profess our views, because our fathers and mothers are wealthy, owning much land and other property, and if we were now to avow ourselves Christians, we should be cut off without a penny. But when we have inherited our property, we will then publicly profess Christianity, and appoint you our pastor, and pay your salary ourselves. There is not a man among us, they added,

who gets less than fifty rupees monthly.' They then begged of me not to betray them, and told me that upwards of thirty individuals belonged to their assembly. They also said, 'We will send for you sometimes, if you will again favour us with your company.' I explained to them somewhat of the Christian religion, and before leaving, asked permission to engage in prayer. They readily consented, and all knelt down, took off their hats, and behaved with the greatest propriety and reverence, so as to impress me with the conviction that they were familiar with our mode of prayer. When I left, all shook hands with me, and wished me good morning. Two of them accompanied me some little distance from the house, and again begged of me not to betray them."

Although Bernard has not met with them since, it is clear that, to a certain degree, the truth has reached the hearts of these people, and thus the way of the Lord is prepared.

Among the five or six inquirers who give some encouragement to the missionaries, one is a Mohammedan fakir, or mendicant. He has spent his life, from infancy, in begging. He has been to Mecca, making the holy pilgrimage, which it is the dream of all Mussulmans at some time of their lives to make. Eight months ago he landed in Bombay with his wife and one child, a boy nine years of age. He found his way to Agra, and came to the house of one of the theological students begging. “Silver and gold have I none, but such as I have give I unto thee," was the reply. The student was reading his Bible at the time, and he began to speak to the man about the bread of life. The fakir's attention was arrested. He soon said that he was sick of Moham

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ing-house that had lately been abandoned as he went on to state the reasons which in consequence of its age and ruinous con- had finally moved him to preach his faredition had stood a bout central to the well sermon to-day, and sketched, in a few inhabitants on the hill.

moving sentences, the peculiar trial of his When the question of a new building soul during the weeks and months that was agitated, so much was said about the they had been wrangling among them. bleaknees of the old site that a division was gelves in violation of both charity and created at the outset, one party determining justice. never to give up the hill, and the other “It was more than his poor flesh could soon becoming equally determined to locate bear,” he said, "to be punisbed so for the new house elsewhere. The parishioners twenty years of labour among them, comwho resided on “the Flat” had the most forting iheir sick, burying their dead, and money and business ability, and these taking their converts to the blessed sacra. having taken it into their heads that the ments. He could endure that they should meeting-house should be in their precinct, question his strength, doubt his capacity half a mile from the hill, were likely, with call him an old man, and hint at bis having their advantages, to carry the day, to the outlived his usefulness; but that they should certain division of the church, that could set to and destroy the sheep and lambs that ill afford the loss of a tithe of its member- he had folded—that by their divisions and sbip.

unchristian disputes they should threaten With such feeling and such un-sabbath- to tear down what it had taken nearly a like talk the meeting-goers of Winton quarter of a century to build—he was not came up on that beautiful Sunday morning so vigorous as he once was, and it would to stand before the Lord. They met each kill him. They must spare him a little other from the opposite side of the hill that he might recover strength.' with cold nods, in some instances with He went on with his sermon, and the none; and where a recognition in words proud, stubborn beads of his hearers, that was vouchsafed, the hearty, "How do you had turned this way or tbat, after the first do ?” and “Good morning,” were surprise, to exchange glances of astonishtailed into a crusty " du," or "mornin';" ment and sorrow, bowed down, one after and it was well that meeting began before another, like a bulrusb, till the whole any considerable assembly had collected, assembly assumed the look of humility, and or there would in all probability have been the women grew loud in their tears. They a set-to in the porch between the cham- could not consent to lose Pastor Seagraves. pions of the discordant parties.

He was a fixture in their hearts, and, to They went slowly into the meeting-room, many of the congregation, a childhood one after another, with hard updevout memory. He had preached the sermons faces, and, in too many cases, with a secret that had conveyed the first convictions of half-vindictive determination to give one sin to their consciences, and bis counsels another a piece of their mind at noon. had guided them to peace. He had at:

The minister stood before them-an old tended their bedside in sickness, and visited man, with a long blue cloak about his them in bereavement. He bad married shoulders, and hair very grey. One must their sons and daughters, and buried their have been cursed with a more than ordinary dead. For a score of years the history of share of hardness or levity to be able to the church had been his history, and al look upon and not listen with respect to that during that length of time had hapPastor Seagraves. Where did he stand in pened to them of loss

or gain bore in some the controversy of his parishioners ? As a way the impress of himself. Three beantipartisan, nowhere. For months be had ful grandchildren of one of his oldest church preached the Gospel and tried to make members called him, too,

grandfather," peace, and now he had come to the con- and in the graveyard of the parish two of clusion that he must let them alone. The his offspring lay asleep, claiming kindred service proceeded, and anon he rose to name for ever with the people among whom 1. his text—"Finally, brethren, farewell. Be died. No, they could not part with Father perfect, be of good comfort, be of one mind, Seagraves. And, without doubt, in all their live in peace; and the God of love and wrangling with one another most of the peace shall be with you.” The congrega- Pastor's parishioners were utterly innocent tion, who had looked up with a start as he of any intention to grieve him, and thoughtread these words, listened with pale wonder less of any possible harm that their strife

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