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EXERCISE XLI. (Gray).

Low the dauntless Earl is laid,

Gored with many a gaping wound;
Fate demands a nobler head;

Soon a King shall bite the ground.

Long his loss shall Erin weep,

Ne'er again his likeness see:
Long her strains in sorrow steep,

Strains of immortality.

Horror covers all the heath;

Clouds of carnage blot the sun :
Sisters, weave the web of death-

Sisters, cease: the work is done!

Stanza 1. 1. “Dauntless,” expand this word.

Stanza 11. 1. Erin, “ Hïbernia.”—2. To her seeking [him] none like him (par) will be likely-to-return.—4. Cf. Part I. Exercise XLVI. line 4; and see Poet. Orn. § 2.

Stanza III. 1. Covers, “ingruo super.”—3. Cf. Part I. Exercise LXXXIV. line 1; and see Poet. Orn. § 2.

EXERCISE XLII. (Goldsmith).

Turn, gentle Hermit of the dale,

And guide my lonely way,
To where yon taper cheers the vale

With hospitable ray.
For here forlorn and lost I tread,

With fainting steps and slow;
Where wilds immeasurably spread

Seem lengthening as I go.

“Forbear, my son,” the Hermit cries,

“To tempt the dangerous gloom; “For yonder phantom only flies

“To lure thee to thy doom !

Stanza 1. 1. Hermit, “venerabilis incola saltûs.”—3, 4. Guide me to where the friendly light which gives its tiny ray afar illumines the vale and the gloomy shades.The order of the words will have to be altered considerably.

Stanza 11. 3, 4. Where wilds seem to grow with boundless tracts, and there is no end (meta) nor any limit to my wandering.

Stanza 111. Hermit, "senior."-2." Dangerous gloom," dangers of the nightly journey.—4. It lures thee on only (non nisi, Part I. Exercise V. line 3) with fatal craft.

EXERCISE XLIII. (Broome).

5

Queen of fragrance, lovely Rose,
The beauties of thy leaves disclose !
The Winter's past, the tempests fly,
Soft gales breathe gently through the sky:
The lark, sweet warbling on the wing,
Salutes the gay return of spring :
The silver dews, the vernal showers,
Call forth a bloomy waste of flowers;
The joyous fields, the shady woods,
Are clothed with green, or swell’d with buds. 10
Then haste thy beauties to disclose,

Queen of fragrance, lovely Rose! 1. Queen of fragrance, rerum suavissima.”—2. Beauties, quidquid honoris habent.” Aids 1. h.—6. Rejoices that Spring has revived (reparo) sunny days.—7. The dew sparkles, &c.—8. Waste of flowers, florum copia hìc illic.”—11, 12. Lovely rose, why dost thou delay ? Queen of fragrance, disclose for me, disclose at my prayer (vocata) thy beauties. (Poet. Orn. $. 2.)

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EXERCISE XLIV. (Bp. Heber).

God, who madest Earth and Heaven,

Darkness and light;
Who the day for toil hast given,

For rest the night.
May Thine angel-guards defend us,
Slumber sweet Thy mercy send us;
Holy dreams and hopes attend us,

This livelong night.

5

1. Who madest (creator).—Use "pariter-pariter.” See Part I. Exercise IX. Stanza 1. 3.—2. Whom light and darkness own as their author (pater).–5. Angel. See Part I. Exercise LXX. note.—6. Let kindly rest be with us (comes) under Thy blessing (auspice te).-8. Cf. Ovid, Am. i. 6. 24, “ Tempora noctis eunt."

EXERCISE XLV. (same continued).

Guard us waking, guard us sleeping ;
And, when we die,
May we in Thy mighty keeping

All peaceful lie:
When the last dread call shall wake us
Do not Thou, our God, forsake us,
But to reign in glory take us

With Thee on high.

1. Make two verses of this line. Expand “guard” into “curâ præsidioque fove,” for the Pentameter; and make the Hexameter by expanding into whether we wake.' Cf. Part II. Exercise XIV. line 3, &c., &c.—5. See Poet. Orn. €.-6. See Aids 1. C. -8. To reign, &c., [As] the partners and sharers of Thy kingdom. This will make the Pentameter.

EXERCISE XLVI. (Sir W. Davenant).
Roses and pinks will be strewn where you go;
Whilst I walk in shades of willow, willow.

When I am dead let him that did slay me
Be but so good as kindly to lay me
There where neglected lovers mourn,
Where lamps and hallow'd tapers burn,
Where clerks in quires sad dirges sing,
Where sweetly bells at burials ring.

My rose of youth is gone,
Wither'd as soon as blown !
Lovers, go ring my knell!
Beauty and love, farewell!
And lest virgins forsaken

Should perhaps be mistaken
In seeking my grave, alas ! let them know
I lie near a shade of willow, willow !

10

15

3, 4. This one thing grant me (exsequor), thou who hast been the cause of my death, lay my limbs in the spot I have enjoined.—5, 6. “Neglected lovers.' See Part I. Exercise V. line 1, note.—7. Clerk, “sacerdos.”—8. “ melos exsequiale.” 11. “Si quis,” or “ quisquis amas.” Cf. “ Quisquis amas, scabris hoc bustum cædite saxis,” Propert. iv. 5. 75.–12. “ Beauty and Love.” see Aids 1. h.--13–15. From and lest—my grave,” to make two lines.—15, 16. Hear my warning, ye virgin bands; the drooping willow o'ershadows my resting-place (cubile).

EXERCISE XLVII.

Το
yon

fause stream that, near the sea,
Hides mony an elf and plum,
And rives wi' fearful din the stanes,

A witless knight did come.

The day shines clear-far in he's gane

Where shells are silver bright;
Fishes were leapin' a' around,

An' sparklin' to the light.

When, as he lav’d, sounds came sae sweet

Frae ilka rock and tree ;
The brief was out-'twas him it doom'd

The mermaid's face to see.

Glossary. “Plum," a deep hole.—“witless," ignorant of his destiny.-"ilka,” every.—“the brief was out,” the sentence, or doom, had

gone

forth. Stanza 1. 2. There is a place where (est ubi) a stream flows into the sea with treacherous course,—the deep water hides many mermen. Cf. Virg. Æn. v. 824, “ Tritonesque citi, Phorcique exercitus omnis."

Stanza II. 1. Far in, &c.—“ruit urinator in undas.”“urinator,” a diver.—3, 4. Poet. Orn. K.—“Were leaping.”

Aids I. a.

Stanza III. 1, 2. Break up the English :-freely thus ; Sweet sounds were heard ; the rocks and trees (nemus) repeat the sweet sounds. Poet. Orn. Š. 2.-3, 4. Fate's inevitable decree had gone forth: he was to behold (intueor) the mermaid's face.—“ inevitable.” Aids 11. 1.

EXERCISE XLVIII. (same continued).

Frae 'neath a rock, soon, soon she rose

An' stately on she swam,
Stopp'd i' the midst, an' beck’d, an' sang

To him to stretch his han'.

Gowden glist the yellow links

That round her neck she'd twine;
Her e’en were o' the skyie blue,

Her lips did mock the wine.

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