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at heart the interest of the same object, but in departments usually quite different from each other. The one feeds and clothes. The other educates. Let the two be distinct, and let each sustain the other. Let the parent see that the child is at school always, and always in season; and let it be encouraged to a rigid and cheerful obedience, to the laws of the school. Let the teacher inculcate lessons of filial obedience, so that there shall not be two discordant, but two consentaneous voices, each as far as possible commending the other's course.

" Concert of action is the secret of success. A discerning child yields readily to a uniform government. *

* The good teacher deserves and well earns a cheerful smile and a cordial hand from every parent. The cold shoulder and the pinched lips freeze his very soul.

TEXT BOOKS, &c. "There is one evil incident to the great market for school books in the United States, which is in some respects, as perplexing as it is important. It has engaged the attention of some of our ablest men, who have endeavored to remove the difficulties, and to organize some plan which shall be worthy the confidence of the people and the friends of education in the whole country. The evil to which reference is had is the rapid and constant increase of books designed for use in schools. It is to be expected that men of cultivated and active minds will find employment to a greater or less extent in the department of education; yet while our presses are throwing off, almost every day, some new school book, the majority of them can hardly be said to possess any sterling value, and certainly no special claims to favor. Many of them are but the re-issues, in transpositions and re-arrangements, in altered words and phrases, of better books, which have served as the basis for the new work.

"The truth of these remarks will be found warranted by the fact, that there are now used in the schools under the care of this Board, a great variety of books, which certainly cannot fail to be productive of some annoying if not evil consequen'ces.

“These books are of several grades, some being elementary and others more advanced, but even on a critical classification, it must be confessed that there is too great a diversity in our text books, to harmonize with that uniformity which should characterize a homogeneous system.”

REPORT OF BOARD OF EDUCATION OF NEW YORK CITY. “School Committees and Teachers are exposed to much annoyance from book agents. Their importunities for patronage are so urgent and persevering, that it is difficult to get rid of them, except by yielding to their wishes. And in furtherance of their mission, they sometimes intrude themselves into the schools, without the knowledge or consent of the Committee, to the no small interruption of the exercises, and even make use of means to get their books introduced without the action of the Committee, especially in remote districts,

* The only safe rule on this subject is, that no agent shall ever enter a school room without being accompanied by some one of the Committee, or having their consent in writing, and that no book shall be used in any school, that is not placed on the list of books adopted, by an express and recorded vote of the Committee."

REPORT OF School COMMITTEE OF SPRINGFIELD. “ The privileges of a High School are not only brought within reach of each district, but of all classes of community, and are actually enjoyed by the children of the same age, from families of the most diverse circumstances as to wealth, education and occupation. Side by side in the same recitations, heart and hand in the same sports, pressing up together to the saine attaininents in knowledge and character, are found the children of the rich and the poor,—the more and the les: favored in outward circumstances, without knowing or caring for the arbitrary distinctions which classify and distract society.

“But for the existence of the High School, full three-fourths of those who have been its pupils would most probably never have enjoyed the opportunity of receiving

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more than the lowest rudiments of knowledge. These are the results which should surely commend the High School to the calm judgment and decided support of the great mass of the community, and indeed of every philanthropist.”.

“The influence exerted by the establishment of the High School has been very marked and beneficial. It has caused a generous emulation and elevated the standard of education. It has produced a greater degree of thoroughness, and a better attendance in the common schools. It opens to the poorest child an avenue by which he can be admitted to the realms of knowledge, not as a charity but as a right. It opens to, all those advantages which heretofore money alone, or humiliating dependence could obtain.

"Our public High School has been in operation about ten years, and has during the whole of this time, been highly useful in many ways. It has been a stimulus to exertion to the scholars of the lower schools, and has furnished us with well educated teachers in our common schools.

“The influence of the High School is decidedly manifest in elevating public sentiment in reference to the advantages of common schools and the value of general education. It presents also a powerful and abiding stimulus to the scholars in the lower schools to greater dilligence and effort to qualify themselves to gain admission, so that even our grammar schools now, are far better than our best schools, public or private, before this system was introduced. The effect is also visible in removing the necessity for private schools; and the children of all classes now vie with each other on a common level for elevation, and the only ground for distinction is good scholarship and correct deportment. Nor can the benevolent mind contemplate without satisfactiou, its results in imparting a gratuitous edueation of an elevated character to hundreds of children whose means are totally inadequate to secure it in private schools.

“It takes the children of the people and sends them out into life endowed with such eminent advantages of education, that they will be a blessing to society, adorning their varied pursuits with intelligence, enriching them with their discoreries, elevating and equalizing the rank and respectability of their widely different occupations, making industry honorable, and securing to labor its proper dignity. It will bring out genius that otherwise might be lost forever. It will pick up perhaps out of the kennels of society, many a gem of priceless value and will polish it and set it on high, that it may shed its lustre upon the world.”

Extract from RePORT of School COMMITTEE IN 0110, on High Schools. Dr. Sears, Secretary of the Mass. Board of Education, in reference to High Schools, says:

“ High Schools have sprung up rapidly in all parts of the Commonwealth within the last six years making the number about eighty.

"Nor is that which is gained in the wider distribution of the privileges of a higher education counterpoised by any deterioration of its quality. We have the testimony of gentlemen connected with the colleges, that from the time they begin to receive students from these recently established High Schools, the classes coming under their care have been actually improved ; that the young men brought forward in these schools have generally manifested superior energy of mind and of will; and that even in those cases where their knowledge of Latin and Greek was found less accurate than that of other students, the reverse of which was generally true, they still possessed a greater amount of general knowledge, and various culture, and constituted on the whole a better class of students.

“The effect of this order of schools in developing the intellect of the Common. wealth, in opening channels of free communication between all the more flourishing towns of the State and the colleges or schools of science is just beginning to lie observed. They discover the taeasures of native intellect that lie hidden aino g the people; make young men of superior minds conscious of their powers; bring those who are by nature destined to public service, to institutions suited to foster their talents; give a new impulse to the college, not only by swelling the number of their F

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students, but by raising the standard of excellence in them; and finally give to the public, with all the advantages of education, men who otherwise might have remained in obscurity or have acted their part struggling with embarrassments and difficulties.

“Another effect of this liberal policy is, that it gives the schools themselves a place in the estimation of the people, which they never held before. We need not go back many years to find a prejudice against the public schools and in favor of academies and private schools. The latter were regarded as more respectable; and many families gave their money and their children to them, as being designed for a more select class. Now the case is reversed. There are no better schools in the Commonwealth than some of our public high schools, and to these, families of the highest character now prefer to send their children. This makes our schools common in the best sense of the word, common to all classes, nurseries for a truly republican feeling, public sanctuaries, where the children of the Commonwealth fraternally meet and where the spirit of party and of caste can find no admittance."

TABLE NO. 1.
SHOWING AMOUNT OF INCOME APPORTIONED.

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Bad Ax,
Brown,
Calumet,
Columbia,
Crawford,
Dane,
Dodge,
Fond du Lac,
Grant,
Green,
Iowa,
Jefferson,
Kenosha,
La Fayette,
La Crosse,
Manitowoc,
Marquette,
Milwaukee,
Oatagamie,
Racine,
Richland,
Rock,
St. Croix,
Sauk,
Sheboygan,
Washington,
Walworth,
Waukesha,
Winnebago,
Waupacca,
Adams,
Marathon,
Oconto,
Ozaukee,
Portage,
Polk,
Pierce,
Waushara,
Chippewa,
Jackson,
Trempeleau,
Buffalo,
Donglas,
Monroe,

$ 33 03 162 72 204 75 452 88 715 64 1141 00

1757 71 722 401 706 95 1113 12 1389 43 1468 60 191 08 273 60 310 95 642 96 858 131 966 70 1213 56 1476 961637 55 3191 04 4287 52 4578 70

132 97 188 16 191 25 485 28 613 41 912 80 2737 118272 16.3587 85 6567 12 7841 50 8319 30 3214 803322 56 3414 60/6212 16 8063 69 8485 40 2133 88 2504 16 2652 40 4595 04 5837 05 6349 00 2527 732780 64 2813 404888 08 5981 95 6246 10 1363 98 1845 60 1853 55 3211 92 3838 36 4076 10 1190 18 1658 16 1723 95 3063 60 3698 97 3659 60 2555 17 2738 40 2805 30 3022 72 6282 22 6057 20 1951 96 1868 64 1793 23 3019 68 3629 74 3322 90 1431 57 1984 80 1999 80 3378 96 4219 81 3970 40

24 39 11 04 150 30 302 40 660 10 858 20 85 88 415 20 571 50 1233 36 1995 59 2702 00 778 55 1333 441279 80 2593 41 3635 383721 20 4998 55 4972 80 5047 659129 8910576 09.10459 40

179 90 373 44 410 85 702 00 1002 22 1066 SO 2485 04 2741 76 2849 85 4855 68 5789 56 5310 20

143 82 218 88 255 15 514 08 753 48 1158 60 3804 30 3702 24 3764 25 6320 88 7591 15 7734 30

19 31 140 64 90 45 174 96 287 38 347 90 703 38 905 761040 85 2048 40 2836 01 3276 00 1480 86 1814 40 1999 35 3605 76 4636 80 5034 40 3061 32 3721 922362 054039 20 5063 45 3131 70 8370 81 8406 56 3158 10 4975 921 6137 32 5737 90 3261 05 3595 20 3560 85 5848 56 6924 61 6463 80 1179 51 1441 92 1426 05 2765 52 3632 16 4028 50

79 68 139 15 497 52 660 90 947 80 58 50 285 84 743 82 1383 90

28 04 74 86 67 90 135 001 230 40 358 221 3:22 00 1566 002928 24 3479 21 3533 60 71 551 152 64 383 181 498 40

51 12 86 181 23 40 70 56 106 26 244 30

1033 62 1241 SO

62 79 123 90 107 87 133 00 60 37 98 70

175 00

45 50 334 20

TABLE NO. 2. SHOWING AMOUNTS OF TAX RAISED IN EACH YEAR, FOR SCHOOL

PURPOSES.

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Adams,
Bad Ax,
Brown,
Calunet, -
Chippewa,
Columbia,
Crawford,
Dane,
Dodge,
Fond du Lac,
Grant,
Green,
Iowa,
Kenosha,
Jefferson,
Monroe,
La Fayette,
La Crosse,
Manitowoc,
Marquette,
Marathon,
Milwaukee,
Outagamie,
Oconto,
Portage,
Racine,
Richland,
Rock,
Sauk,
Sheboygan,
Walworth,
Washington,
Waukesha,
Waushara,
Waupacca,
Winnebago,
St. Croix,
Trempeleau,
Ozaukee,
Polk,
Pierce,
Jackson,
Douglas,
Shawanaw,

135 00 779 00 634 55 82 24 96 491 123 00 262 82 433 11 53 00 773 19 585 10 593 98 662 82 773 66 175 45 149 12 151 48 206 00 347 10 440 03

487 50 575 00 1647 412693 26 2839 15 2761 99/3673 29 5992 61

185 00 241 65 187 58 196 281 320 471 404 83 1509 67 2828 50 1630 61 1662 00 1813 00 8244 37 8920 81 1166 10 3667 581607 401686 28 1768 103159 53 4037 83 342 29 4693 77 2205 47 1250 07 1326 77 9297 52 2918 61 687 00 1400 56 1263 92 1395 07 1418 25 2475 20 5981 95

1276 81 730 00 943 00 930 00 1615 00 1920 20 52 00 1267 71 1681 691601 19 920 18 1802 69 3671 62

2599 92 2480 69 2682 262586 44 8161 735614 02 1125 21 2763 43 1442 77 1380 00 1809 56 2945 15 3141 37

40 32 698 10 133 00 1089 99 936 67 1245 00 1022 00 1900 002192 91

133 88 402 83 309 11 340 84 315 48 650 00790 96 264 16575 64 551 64 593 85 1044 73 1072 95 1817 55 1200 00 1530 66 1435 45 1832 08

75 00 454 50 1602 75 1782 8017456 877535 647813 7017412 02 9837 04

528 37 501 34 337 52 652 84 1008 99

200) 00 80 00 170 00 280 00 65 00

111 80 200 12 288 52 209 64 5777 43 2114 48 1694 47 2356 31 2061 83/3259 64 3321 45

368 57 297 89 187 14 313 85 752 25 938 61'6128 37 3279 35 4048 20 4369 8015118 23 6321 07

434 20 1405 59 1111 71 782 801415 91 1391 92 1307 00 2219 01 1742 70 2562 972830 383008 65 3230 45 1626 79 6484 04 1685 712191 62 1578 432496 00 3068 66

547 00 1054 991587 91 1840 991522 71 2019 60 2531 73 812 57 2297 48 1730 63 1797 60 1775 24 2924 28 3409 34

268 00 306 13 560 24 1128 33

144 90 275 00 461 29 736 62 130 00 1359 971888 05 1584 59 2412 82 2629 65 2887 83 8 00 64 08 85 181 198 60 389 87 265 22

112 41 19 19 835 60 1181 27 1735 39 130 00 100 00 13 64 437 69 100 00 S7 30

40 00 196 70

1150 00 419 34

TABLE NO. 3.

SHOWING NUMBER OF DISTRICTS IN EACIL YEAR.

COUNTIES.

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Brown,
Calumet,
Columbia,
Crawford,
Dane,
Dodge,
Fond du Lac,
Grant,
Green,
Iowa,
Jefferson,
La Fayette,
Manitowoc,
Marquette,
Milwaukee,
Portage,
Racine,
Rock,
St. Croix,
Sauk,
Sheboygan,
Walworth,

(1849 50 51 52 53 54 | 55

|
6 25 17 17 15 16 28
9 7 13 17 17 21 25
41 71 82 911 99/110 109
16! 20 9 11 13 13 21
97 88 158 213 164 160 169
132 135 147 133 134 142 138
78 101 106 114 119 125 120
89 95 100 109 108 113
70 74 79 82 83 94 93

| 51 61 55 62 581 71
78 88 91 89 99 93 178
611 641 69 69 71 7773

7 3 23 33 39 46 62
39 5076
66 62 66 64 64 65 60
2

2 10 211 21
123! 69 541 66 66 67 58
99 104 104 114 115 108 121
1 2

5 9 10 26 37 37 43 53 81 53 71 72 79 85 86 91 108 100 104 981 92 96 97

)

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A BILL FOR AN ACT TO ESTABLISH TEACHERS' INSTITUTES. Sect. 1. Whenever reasonable assurance shall be given to the State Superintendent of Public Instruction, that a uumber not less than fifty teachers of common schools shall desire to assemble for the purpose of forming a Teacher's Institute, and to remain in session not less than ten working days, the said State Superintendent, or in case of his inability, such person or persons as he shall delegate, shall appoint a time and place for said meeting, make suitable arrangements therefor, and give due notice thereof.

Sect. 2. For the purpose of defraying the expenses of rooms, fires, lights, attendance, or other necessary charges, and for procuring teachers and lecturers for said Institute, the said State Superintendent may draw upon the Treasurer of the State for a sum not exceeding two hundred dollars for any one Institute, from such funds as may be in the Treasury, under the general warrant of the Governor for that purpose.

Sect. 3. To meet the expenses aforesaid, the Governor is hereby authorized to draw his warrant upon the 'Treasurer for a sum not exceeding one thousand dollars per annum, to be taken from the income of the School Fund, and to remain in the Treasury subject to the drafts provided for in the second section of this bill.

A. CONSTANTINE BARRY,

State SUPEINTENDENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION,

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