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The Civil Service of the United States

Source: Official Report of the Commission

jin Dist. Outside

In Dist., Outside
Date
Col. D. Col. Total

Date

Col. D. Col. Total June 30, 1922. 69.980 457.537 527,517 June 30, 1932.

68,793 514 403 583.196 June 30, 1923. 66,290 449,482 515,772 December 31, 1932

66,302 502,043 568,345 December 31, 1923. 65,025 447,064 512,089 June 30, 1933

65,437 506.654 572,091 June 30, 1924. 64,120 457.521 521,641 | December 31, 1933.

76.558 531,378 607,936 December, 30, 1924 66,079 456,285 522,364 June 30. 1934

89,132 583,9631 673.095 June 30, 1925

63,756 469,042 532,798 December 31, 1934. 95,462 590,033 685,495 December 31, 1925 61,509 454,568 516,077 June 30, 1935

103,453 615,987 719,440 June 30, 1926.

60,811 467,731 528,542 December 31, 1935. 111,692 704,097 815,789 December 31, 1926. 59,569 455,041 514,610 June 30, 1936

117,103 707,156 824,259 June 30, 1927

59,800 467,428 527,228 December 31, 1936. 115,964 715,131 831,095 December 31, 1927 60.660 461,538 522,198 June 30, 1937.

115,409 726,256 841.664 June 30, 1928 61,388 479,479 540,867 December 31, 1937

113,329 699,9731 813,302 December 31, 1928. 62,140 481,883 544,023 June 30, 1938.

115,590| 736,336 851,926 June 30, 1929. 63,904 495,675 559,579 December 31, 1938

119,547 742,367 861,914 December 31, 1929 63.946 495,672 559,618 June 30, 1939

123,364 796,946 920,310 June 30, 1930

68.510 511.984 580,494 December 31, 1939. 126,345 805,960 932,305 December 31, 1930. 71,189 494,554 565,743 June 30, 1940

133,645 869,175 1,002,820 June 30, 193!

71.693 516,513 588,206 December 31, 1940. 154,680 964,961 1,119,641 December 31, 1931. 69,435) 506,521) 575,956 June 30, 1941.

183,907'1,174,2431,358,150 The figures in the tables above and below do not the employees of the District of Columbia Governinclude employees in the Legislative or Judicial ment; also do not include enrolees engaged in branches of the United States Government, the Civilian Conservation Corps work. Military and Naval forces of the United States, or

On June 30, 1941, the civil employees of the Government numbered 1,091,743 men, of whom 808,69 1 had classified jobs; and 266,407, of whom 181,527 were in classified positions.

Government Employees by Sex and Location, June 30, 1941

Entire Service

Entire Service
Depart. or Indep.

Depart. or Indep.
Establishment
Total Men Women
Establishment Total

Men Women Office of President:

Fed. Dep. Ins. Corp.

2,357 1,386 971 Executive Stall...

1,173 671 502 Federal Loan Agency 18,653 10,472 8,181 Maintenance Force.

98
75

23 Fed. Security Agency 31,872 18,969 12.904 Executive Depart. :

Federal Wks. Agency 39,020 22,757 16,263 State..

7,009 4.685 2,324 General Account. Or.. 5, 461 3,439 2,022 Treasury

65,573 42,539 23,034| Govern, Printing On.. 7.119 5,712 1,407 War 320,291 250,954 69,337 Inters. Com. Commis. 2.799

1,955

844 Justice 21,401 16,481 4,920 Maritime Commis,

2,157 1,587 570 Post Omce. 301,215 276.253 24.962 Off Emerg. Manag

3.691 1.749 1.942 Navy 222,862 207,971 14,891 Panama Canal

36,425 33.755 2.870 Interior

47,980 39,670 8,310 Selective Sery. Sys. 16,593 5,8011 10,792 Agriculture

91,146 66,059 25,087 Ten. Valley Author. 23.006 21,682 1.324 Commerce

23,896 16,186 7.710 Veterans Adminis.. 42,948 28,326 14.622 Labor

4,579 2,335 2,244 Chief Indep. Estab. :

Total

1,358,150 1,091,743 266,407 Civil Service Commis. 6,709 2,348 4,361

President Roosevelt issued an executive order their records filled with the Federal Bureau of (June 13, 1941) requiring all Federal employees Investigation. coming under civil service to be fingerprinted and

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U. S. Personnel and Payroll, Including Defense, Dec., 1940

Major Functional

Group

Source: United States Bureau of Labor Statistics

No. of Monthly Major Functional
Persons Pay Rolls

Group

All groups:

Exclud. national defense

Includ.pational defense
General government.
Law enforcement..
Public works..
(onserv., development.
Agriculture
Indust., commerc develop.
Regulation (busin., pina).
Labor and indust. relat..

Health.
836,492 3134,028,514 Welfare.
2,078,509 242,182,190 Indian al airs

96,309 17,227,798 Postal Service
16,872 2,751,496 Other pub. serv. enterp..
88,446 9,809,388 Gen. Inform, and research
22,671 3.569,666 Education and reference.
41,548 6,858.236 National defense
23,846 4.289,576 Armed services.
22,336 4,540,542 Civilian employments..
4.6711 878,778

No. of Monthly Persons Pay Rolls

10,584 1,493,674 99,191 13,827.216 11,098 1,377,424 362,457 61,851.194 19,769 3,203, 278 13,848 1.920,137

2.846 431,111 1,242,017 108, 153,676

884,094 56,556.999 357,9231 51,566,677

GAINFUL WORKERS 16 YEARS OLD AND OVER IN U. S.: 1870 to 1930

(Numbers in thousands.)

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Agriculture and allied occupations
Mining
Manufacturing and mechanical industries
Trade and transportation..
Clerical service.
Domestic and personal service,
Public service not elsewhere classified.
Professional service..

10.242

10,524

10,872

9,803

8,973

7,830

6,428

983 13,790 9.963 3,935 5,448

692 3,110

1,083 12,425 7.360 2,952 3,605

642 2,203

947 10.253 6,223 1,635 3,805

382 1,727

576 7,537 4,445

781 2,726

260 1,196

388 5,743 2,969

543 2,133

185 880

252 4.033 1,741

330 1,437

107 543

172 2,674 1,104

206 1,168

73 338

The National Parks and National Monuments

Source: National Park Service The National Park Service (June 30, 1941) is responsible for 26 national parks, 4 national historical parks, 82 national monuments,' 1 national recreational area, 11 national military parks, 7 national battlefield sites, 9 national memorials, 13 national cemeteries, 8 national historic sites, 3 national parkways, and i national capital park. The total area of the Federal Park System was 21,613,543 acres.

Following are the national parks. The year is that of creation of the park; figures in parentheses show area, in square miles.

Acadia, 1929, Maine coast (29)-The group of (3,472)-More geysers than in all rest of world granite mountains upon Mount Desert Island and together. Boiling springs; mud volcanoes; petrified also bold point on opposite mainland across French- forests. Grand Canyon of the Yellowstone, remarkmans Bay.

able for gorgeous coloring. Large lakes; many

large streams and waterfalls. Bryce Canyon, 1928,, Southwestern Utah (56) -Box canyon filled with countless array of fantas, valley of world-lamed beauty. Lofty cliffs; roman

Yosemite, 1890, Middle Eastern California (1,189) tically eroded pinnacles. Best exhibit of vivid tic vistas; many waterfalls of extraordinary height; coloring of earth's materials.

3 groves of Big Trees. Carlsbad Caverns, 1930, Southeastern New

Zion, 1919, Southwestern Utah (135)—Magnifi. Mexico (77)–Contains stupendous caverns, not

cent gorge (Zion Canyon), depth from 1,500 to yet wholly explored, limestone decorations.

2,500 feet, with precipitous walls. Crater Lake, 1902, Southwestern Oregon (251)Lake of extraordinary blue in crater of extinct vol

NATIONAL HISTORICAL PARKS cano. Sides 500 to 2,000 feet high. Interesting lava Abraham Lincoln, 1916, Kentucky (0.17)-Conformations. Fine fishing.

tains memorial building covering log cabin thought Glacier, 1910, Northwestern Montana (1,538) – to be that in which Lincoln was born. Rugged mountain region of unsurpassed alpine Chalmette, 1907, Louisiana (0.05)-Part of the character, more than 200 glacier-fed lakes of ro- ground on which the Battle of New Orleans was mantic beauty, 60 small glaciers. Precipices thou- fought, Jan. 8, 1815. sands of feet deep.

Colonial National, 1936, Southeastern Virginia Grand Canyon, 1919, North Central Arizona (10)--Includes three areas of historic importance (1,008)-The greatest example of erosion and the in Colonial history-Jamestown, Williamsburg, and most sublime spectacle in the world.

Yorktown. Grand Teton, 1929, Northwestern Wyoming Morristown, 1933, New Jersey (1.64)-Served as (150)-Includes most spectacular portion of Teton base hospital for the Colonial Army throughout the Mountains, an uplift of unusual grandeur.

Revolutionary War, and was the main camp site of Great Smoky Mountains, 1930, North Carolina the American armies during the winters of 1776-77 and Tennessee (714)-Massive mountain uplift; and 1779-80. magnificent forests.

The mansion of the late Frederick W. VanderHawaii, 1916, Hawaii (271)-Interesting volcanic bilt, north of Hyde Park, Dutchess County, N. Y., areas–Kilauea and Mauna Loa, active volcanoes on has been deeded to the U. S. Govt., by his niece, the island of Hawaii; Haleakala, a huge extinct | Mrs. Margaret Louise Van Alen, and has been volcano on the island of Maui.

designated as the Vanderbilt Mansion National Hot Springs, 1921, Middle Arkansas (1.57)- Historic Site. Hot Springs said to possess healing properties.

NATIONAL MONUMENTS Many hotels and boarding houses; bathhouses under

These "monuments include the Aztec Ruins at Government supervision. Isle Royale, 1940, Michigan (209)--Largest island

Aztec, New Mexico; the Cliff Dwellers ruins in

Arizona and New Mexico; Big Hole Indian 1877 in Lake Superior; an area of rugged forested wil.

Battlefield in Montana; Castle Pinckney, near derness.

Kings Canyon, 1940, California (710)-Sierra Charleston, S. C.; Fort Jefferson, Fla.; Craters wilderness with numerous peaks 13,000 to 14,000 (lava) of the Moon, Idaho; Death' Valley, Calif.; feet high; park also contains Big Tree groves.

Dinosaur fossil remains, Jensen, Utah; George Lassen 'Volcanic, 1916, Northern California (163) Washington Birthplace near Fredericksburg, Va.; -only recently active volcano in United States

Glacier Bay, Alaska; Grand Canyon, Ariz., Black

Canyon of the Gunnison, Colo.;
Lassen Peak, 10,453 feet; Cinder Cone,

Great Sand proper. 6,913 feet; hot springs; mud geysers.

Dunes in the San Luis Valley, Colo.; Katmai, ValMammoth Cave, 1936, Southwestern Kentucky ley of 10,000 Smokes, Alaska; Lava Beds, Calif.: (76)-Series of caverns including spectacular onyx

Mounds (prehistoric) near Chillicothe, O.; Muir cave formation. Became nationally known in the redwood) groves in Calif.; Natural Bridges, in

Utah; Petrified war of 1812 when saltpeter from the cave was

Forest, near Adamana, Ariz.; used in making gunpowder.

Joshua Tree, in Calif., south of the Mojave Desert; Mesa Verde, 1906, Southwestern Colorado (80)- Statue of Liberty, N. Y. Harbor, Ocmulgee (Indian Most notable and best preserved prehistoric cliff mounds, 693 acres in and around Macon, Ga.; dwellings in the United States.

Appomattox Court House, Va.; Ft. Marion, Fla.; Mount McKinley, 1917, South Central Alaska Ft. Laramie, Wyoming, Ft. Matanzas, Fla. Ft. (3,030)-Highest mountain in North America,

McHenry, Md.; Ft. Pulaski, Ga. Mount Rainier, 1899, West Central Washington

Kill Devil Hill Monument, No. Car., where the (378) - Largest accessible single peak glacier sys- Wright pioneer sustained flight by a heavier-thantem; 28 glaciers, some of large size, more than 40 air machine was made, is a National Memorial. square miles of glacier, 50 to 500 feet thick,

NATIONAL MILITARY PARKS Olympic, 1938, Northwest Washington (1,305)

Chickamauga and Chattanooga, Chattanooga, Notable as finest remnant of the Pacific North

Tenn. Fort Donelson, Erin, Tenn. Frederickswest forests, including the famous rain forests,

burg and Spotsylvania County Battlefields Memoand for its numerous glaciers; also as the sum

rial, Fredericksburg, Va. Gettysburg, Gettysburg, mer feeding ground for the rare Roosevelt Elk.

Pa. Guilford Courthouse, Greensboro, No. Car. Platt, 1906, Southern Oklahoma (1.33)-Sulphur Kings Mountain, Kings Mountain, South Car. and other springs.

Moores Creek, Currie, No. Car. Petersburg, PetersRocky Mountain, 1915. North Middle Colorado burg, Va. (405) —Heart of the Rockies, snowy range, peaks Stones River, Murfreesboro, Tenn.

Shiloh, Pittsburgh Landing.., Tenn.

Vicksburg, 11,000 to 14,255 feet altitude. Remarkable records Vicksburg, Miss. of glacial period. Sequoia, 1890, Middle Eastern California (604)

NATIONAL BATTLEFIELD SITES The Big Tree National Park, Scores of sequoias 20 Antietam, Sharpsburg, Md. Brice's Cross Roads, to 30 feet in diameter, thousands over 10 feet in Bethany. Miss. Cowpens, near Spartanburg, So. diameter, General Sherman Tree, 36.5 feet in dia- Car, Fort Necessity, S. E. of Uniontown, Pa. meter and 272.4 feet high. Towering mountain Kennesaw Mountain, near Marietta, Ga. Tupelo, ranges; startling precipices. Mount Whitney and Miss. White Plains, N. Y. (west side of Bronx Kern River canyon.

River Parkway at foot of Chatterton Hill), a monShenandoah, 1935, in Northwestern Virginia ument. (286)-Embraces outstanding scenic section of the The National Cemeteries administered by the Blue Ridge Mountains.

National Park Service are-Antietam, Md.: BattleWind Cave, 1903, South Dakota (20)-Cavern ground, Georgia Ave., D. C.; Chattanooga, Tenn.; having several miles of galleries and numerous Custer Battlefield, Montana; Fort Donelson, Tenn.; chambers containing peculiar formations.

Fredericksburg, Va.; Gettysburg, Pa.; Poplar Grove, Yellowstone, 1872, Northwestern Wyoming, Va., Shiloh, Tenn.; Stones River, Tenn.; VicksSouthwestern Montana, and Northeastern Idaho) burg, Miss., and Yorktown, Va.

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Acres
Acres

Acres
Acres

Acres

Acres Ala. 2,435,901 599,364||Mass

1,651

1,651 Penn. 746,703 449.876 Alaska. 20,897,227 20,863.779 Mich.. 5,095,081 1.965,404 P. Rico. 186.155 26,010 Ariz 12, 158,282 11,465,125 Minn 5,041,824 2,528,842 S. C... 1,422, 604 559.874 Ark

3,498,701 2,155,484 Miss. 2,776,405 1,009,745 S. D.. 1,400, 109 1,104,114 Call 24,749,731 19,286,611 Mo.

3,321,513 1,215,820|| Tenn.. 1,204,000 547.162 Colo 15,208,180 13,661,830 Mont 18,973,857 16,253,438 Texas. 1,714,374 644,937 Fla. 1.241,955 989, 779 Nebr

207,209 206,026 | Utah.. 8,985,378 7.786,429 Ga 1,661,322 629,129 Nev. 5,245,677 4,990, 221Vt.

580,520 167,094 Idaho. 21,477,524 19,968,670|N. H.

806,322 664,146 Va. 4,123,663 1,384.745 Ill

812,654 197,337 N. M 10,236,090 8,861,972 Wash. 10,706,908 9,251.972 Ind. 781,467 60,155N. C

3,588,126 970,111W. Va.. 1,836, 140 901,562 Iowa. 218,446 4,042 N D

764,441

520|| Wise... 2,016,924 1,366.004 Ку. 1.393,521 425,632Ohio 1,466,109 57,784 Wyo... 9,116,183

8,658,185 La. 1,274,066 529,351||Okla.

344,269 158.399 Me. 878,032 48,081 Oreg.

17,574,114 14,162,989 Tot..228,173,676 176,779,377 Md. 4,318

9761 Income from the national forests during the fiscal year 1940-1941 was $6,681,825, as against $6,751,553 in 1930. Returns from timber sales to the Federal Treasury reached an all time high at $4,789,040. The receipts included $1,429,091 of grazing fees and special-use fees of $383,477 for Summer home sites, resorts and other private or semi-private develcpments permitted on Federal lands.

STATE PARKS, FORESTS, AND RECREATIONAL AREAS, 1941
Recreat. Other
Recreat. Other

Recreat. Other States Areas andTot.

States Areas and Tot. States Areas and Tot.

Acres Acres
Acres Acres

Acres Acres Ala. 21.708 58,075 Md.

3,151 104,879 Oreg.

20.068 90.068 Ariz. 7,797 7.797 Mass 20,685 194,824 Pa

30,692 2,242,520 Ark 14,822 18,242 Mich 39,047 1,325,688 R. I.

7,380 7.914 Calif. 316,527 316,527 Minn 45,341 1.380.511 S. C.

22.861 134,650 Colo.

120
120 Miss
9.737 9.737 S. D.

108,640 123.336 Conn 12,994 96,152 Mo. 18,651 52,016 Tenn..

8.732 135,359 Dela.

1,937 Mont.
2,777 522,777| Texas.

308,978 315.508 Fla. 19.854 446,673 Nebr 3,902 7,057 Utah

52.344 Ga. 11,218 58,198 Nevada. 11.500 12,100 Vt

5,383 75.086 Idaho 42,618 42,518||N. H.. 42.631 66,705 Va

18.304 57,676 III. 11,452 21,435|N. J 18,844 73,589 Wash,

44,804 44,804 Ind 14,121 77,871N. M.

4,794 7,552 W. Va.

29.599 75.050 Iowa. 18,779 24,708N. Y 2,562,971 2,942,543 Wisc.

12,409 190.138 Kan. 11,072 13,499||N. C. 28.740 122,740 Wyo.

1,238 1.238 Ку.. 40.220 55,185N. D.

3,309 5,149 La. 6,772 291,978 Ohio

19.266 114,361 Total.... 4,055,281 12.087.854 Me. 16,409 18,494| Okla.

34,464 50,527 Recreation areas include parks, including the Catskill and Adirondack Preserves.

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Production of Lumber in the United States Source: United States Bureau of the Census; Federal Forest Service; figures show millions of board feet 1869. 112,755/1921

26,961||1928
134,142||1935.

119,539 1879 18,091 1922 31.569|1929 36,886|1936

24,355 1889 23,842||1923 37,166|1930 26.051 | 1937

25,997 1899. 35,078 |1924 35,931 1931

16,523 1938,

121.646 1909. 44,510||1925 38,339||1932 10,151||1939

24,975 1919.. 34,552||1926

36,936 1933

13.961 1920. 33,799||1927 34,5321934

15,494 The amount of the chief species sawed in 1939 (M ft., b.m.) was: softwood-Douglas fir. 6,494,301; hemlock, 665,259; cypress, 421,584; cedar, 263.693; balsam fir, 20,002; white pine, 1,004,262; yellow pine, 7,749,188: ponderosa pine, 3,360,004; spruce, 346, 159; redwood, 345,003; sugar pine, 308.929; larch, 111,488 white fir, 97,712; lodgepole pine, 54,803.

Hardwood-ash, 90,428; basswood, 95,688; beech, 119,564; birch, 140,738; chestnut, 74,051; cottonwood, 129.858; elm, 73,845; hickory, 37.759: maple, 445, 163: oak, 1,432,119; red gum, 382,693; sycamore, 27,104 tupelo 271,486; walnut, 27,007; yellow poplar, 276,383.

LUMBER SAWED IN 1939 BY STATES
Soft-
Soft-

Soft-
Total
wood

Total
wood

Total wood
State
M ft. M ft. State
M ft. M ft. State

M ft. M ft. b.m. b.m. b.m. b.m.

b.m. b.m. Alabama. 1,412,222 1,237,488 Louisiana. 1,036,351 687,709 Oklahoma 142,995 128.050 Arixona. 119,206 119,206 Maine

213,116
184,314 Oregon

4,764,802 4.746,446 Arkansas 1,109,886 863,471 Maryland

51,438 31.755 Pennsylvania. 185,684 60.143 Calif., Nevada 1,684,694 1,684,694 Mass

67,402 56,766 Rhode Island. 5,382 4,996 Colorado. 83,914 83.864 Michigan

333,234 118.984 South Carolina 646,212 492.331 Connecticut. 17,248

11,044 Minnesota 111,218 69,330 South Dakota. 41,933 41.933 Delaware

11,124 9,194 Mississippi. 1,200, 700 928,228 Tennessee. 376,446 129,647 Florida. 602,849 549.930|| Missouri.

74,086 18,814 Texas..

1.136,958 1,018,511 Georgia 907,1691 803.406 Montana 271.096 270.951 | Utah.

15,113 14,987 Idaho. 675,165 675,088N H. 186,926 164,678 Vermont.

105,983 62,328 Illinois 27,2111 440| New Jersey 14,067 1,551 Virginia.

678,8201 477.236 Indiana

111.280 115 New Mexico. 106.227 106,227 Washington, 4,244,001 4,223,723 Iowa.

5,164

New York 107,856 38.103 West Virginia 324,484 43,208 Kan., Nebr.

3.638

North Carolina 1,042,122 842,983 Wisconsin. 336,797 141,843 Kentucky 207.370 32,429|Ohio..

110,5451 926 Wyoming.. 65,3401 65,319 The above table excludes the cut made by lath and shingle mills.

This table presents statistics separately for each State for which figures can be given without disclosing data for individual mills. No lumber production was reported from North Dakota.

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ELECTION RETURNS BY STATES

Source: Official Returns by the States

Alabama

(Presidential vote, 1940, 1936)
1940
1936

1940

1936

5. Lee..

48

50

48

489

80

174 238,195

Counties Roos., Willkie, Roos., Landon, Countles Roos., Wulkie. Roos., Landon, Dem. Rep. Dem. Rep.

Dem. Rep. Dom. Rep. Autanga.

1.630

99
1.525
84 Jackson.

3,818 945 3,456 926 Baldwin. 2,681 618 2,338 434 Jefferson

37.110 6,714 35.984 3,813 Barbour

2.328
90 2,386
50 Lamar

2.665 275 2,393 195 Bibb..

1,821

173 1,868 190 Lauderdale. 5.065 507 4.686 391 Blount.. 2,784 855 3,788

744 Lawrence.

2,277 480 2,2131 Bullock

1,301
18 1,188

2.566 103 2,183

93 Butler

2,732
52 2.358
83 Limestone.

2,941

95 2.8611 108 Calhoun 4,408 648 4,322 581 Lowndes.

1.132
12 1.204

10 Chambers

4,141
110 3.626 112 Macon.

1.259
41 1,146

39 Cherokee.. 2,617 381 2,113

376 Madison.

5.515 556 5.663 514 Chilton.

2,746
1,995 2.565
1,469 Marengo.

2,284
70 2,287

33 Choctaw.

2,023
73 1,507
74 Marion

2.654 · 1.081 2,655 892 Clarke. 3,753 2,673 60 Marshall

4.142 913

4.208

925 Clay 2,153 854 2,139

700 Mobile..

11,480

1,885!

11.1651 1,072 Cleburne.. 1,369 434 1.212 543 Monroe.

2.953
40 2.559|

29 Coffee 2.226 145 3.178

110 Montgom'y.

11.311 230 12.061 223 Colbert 3,998 365 3.365 251 Morgan,

5,3451 500 5,5981 433 Conecuh 2,345

2,195
891|Perry

1,509

39 1,527 24 Coosa 1,347 317 1.346 239 Pickens.

1,714 140 1,665 107 Covington. 4,635 186 4,265

1671 Pike

3,049
121 3.100

55 Crenshaw

2.680
84 2.371
96) Randolph

2,407 670 2,766 793 Cullman 5.603 3,057 3.779 1,705 Russell

2,435

2.181

66 Dale.

2,543

374
2,404 193 Shelby

2,777 938 2,371 777 Dallas 3,106 157 2,5051 49 St. Clair.

2,462 1,540 2.399 1,465 DeKalb 5,432 2,810 6.123

4,620 Sumter

1,404
46 1.3691

24 Elmore

4,267
144 3.967
182 Talladega.

3,965 534 3,751
Escambia.
2,772 137 2,587

103 Tallapoosa.

4.325 139 3.625 141 Etawah.

7,012 1,270 5,739 1,207|Tuscaloosa. 6,2841 426 6.0301 332 Fayette. 2,091 737 2,244 732 Walker

5,940 2,007

5,697

1,699 Franklin 3.523 1.989 3,059 1,875 Washington

1.892

1,736

72 Geneva. 2,565 364 2.652

295 Wilcox.

1.534
20 1,365

11 Greene..

894

77
861
20 Winston.

1,394 1.686 1,275 1.428 Hale.

1,691
32 1.626

20 Henry

1.960
69 1.925
35 Totals.. 250,726| 42,174

35,358 Houston 3.941 483

3,538 230 1940 (President)--Babson, Proh., 698; Browder, Com., 509; Thomas, Soc., 100. 1938 (U. S. Senator)-Hill, Dem., 113,413; Pennington. Rep., 217,885. 1936 (President)-Browder. Com., 679; Colvin, Proh., 719; Lemke, Union, 549; Thomas, Soc., 242. 1936 (U. S. Senator)-Bankhead, Dem., 239,532; Berkstresser, Rep., 33,697.

PAST VOTE OF ALABAMA 1872 (Pres.), Grant, Rep., 90,272 Greeley, Dem. 22,472: Swallow, Proh., 612: Debs, 'Soc., 853. and Lib., 79.444.

1908 (Pres.), Bryan, Dem., 74,374; Taft. Rep., 1876 (Pres.), Hayes, Rep., 68,230; Tilden, Dem.. 25,308; Chafin. Proh. 665; Debs, Soc., 1.399. 102.002.

1912 (Pres.), Wilson, Dem.. 82,438: Taft, Rep.. 1880 (Pres.). Garfield. Rep.. 56.221; Hancock,

9.732; Roosevelt, Prog., 22.680; Debs, Soc., 3.029. Dem., 91,185; Weaver, Greenback, 4.642. 1884 (Pres.). Cleveland, Dem., 93,951; Blaine,

1916 (Pres.). Wilson, Dem., 99,409; Hughes, Rep., Rep., 59,591; St. John, Proh., 612; Butler.

22.809; Hanly, Proh., 1.034: Benson, Soc., 1.925 Greenback, 873.

1920 (Pres.). Cox. Dem., 163.254; Harding. Rep.. 1888 (Pres.), Cleveland, Dem., 117,320: Harrison,

74,690; Watkins, Proh. 757: Debs, Soc., 2.369. Rep., 56,197; Fisk, Proh., 583.

1924 (Pres.). Davis. Dem., 112.966; Coolidge, Rep., 1892 (Pres.), Cleveland, Dem., 138, 138; Harrison,

45,005; LaFollette, Prog., 8.084; Faris, Proh., Rep., 9.197: Weaver, People's 85.181.

538. 1896 (Pres.), Bryan, Dem. and People's (Populist). 1928 (Pres.), Smith, Dem., 127,797; Hoover. Rep.. 131,226; Palmer, Nat'l (Gold) Dem.,

6,464

120.725: Thomas. Soc. 460. McKinley, Rep., 54,737; Levering. Proh., 2.147. 1932 (Pres.), Roosevelt, Dem., 207,910; Hoover, 1900 (Pres.). Bryan. Dem., 96.368: McKinley, Rep., Rep., 34.675; Foster, Com., 406; Thomas, Soc., 55,634; Woolley, Proh., 2.762.

2.030; Upshaw, Proh., 13. 1904 (Pres.), Parker, Dem., 79,857; Roosevelt, Rep.,

Arizona

(Presidential vote, 1940, 1936)
1940
1936

1940

1936 Counties Roos., Willkle, Roos., Landon, Counties Roos., Willkie,l Roos., Landon, Dem. Rep. Dem. Rep.

Dem. Rep. Dem. Rep. Apache. 1.969 926 1,674 638 Navajo.

3,052 1.533 3.037 1,052 Cochise. 8.748 3,170 8.130 2.092 | Pima

14,035 2,445 12,249 6,079 Coconino. 3.025 1,913 2,578 1,140||Pinal.

4,411

3,498 1.216 Gila 5.752 2,624 4,8591 1.526 Santa Cruz. 1,536

978

1.729 742 Graham. 3,130 1,161 3,541 680|Yavapai.

6,217 3.987 6.628 2,794 Greenlee 2,175 619 1,526 218|| Yuma..

4,138 1.870 3,428 976 Maricopa. 35,056 22,610 32,031 13,671 Mohave.

2.024
1,198
1.8141 609 Totals

95,267 54,0301 86,7221

33,433 1940 (President)-Babson, Proh., 742. 1940 (U. S. Senator)-McFarland, Dem., 101,495; Jennings, Rep., 39,657; Gehres, Proh., 579. 1940 (Governor)-Osborn, Dem.; '97,606; Lee Rep., 50,358 Osborn, Proh., 1,003. 1938 (Governor)--R. T. Jones, 'Dem., 80,350; Lee, Rep., 32,022; Kerby, 'Ind., Dem., 4,814.

PAST VOTE OF ARIZONA 1912 (Pres.), Wilson, Dem., 10.324; Taft, Rep. Christensen, Farm.-Lab., 15. 3.021; Roosevelt, Prog., 6.949; Debs. Soc. 3,163. 1924 (Pres.), Coolidge, Rep., 30,516; Davis, Dem.,

26.235; LaFollette, Prog., 17.210. 1916 (Pres.). Wilson, Dem., 33.170; Hughes, Rep.. 20,524; Hanly, Proh., 1.153; Benson, Soc., 3.174.

1928 Pres. Hoover, Repaa 52,533; Smith, Dem., 1920 (Pres.), Cox, Dem., 29.546; Harding. Rep.. 1932 (Pres.) Roosevelt, Dem., 79,264; Hoover, Rep.,

37.016: Watkins. Proh.. 4; Debs, Soc.. 222: 36,104; Thomas, Sec., 2,030; Foster, Com., 406.

1,996

2,689

Arkansas

(Presidential vote, 1940, 1936)
1940
1936

1940

1936 Counties Roos., Willkie, Roos., Landon, Counties Roos., Wilkie, Roos., Landon, Dem. Rep. Dem. Rep.

Dem. Rep. Dem. Rep. Arkansas. 2,345 742 2.008 341 Lincoln

916
99 913

39 Ashley. 1,864 184 1,382

95 Little River 1,104 276 1,056 192 Baxter 859 489 773

375|Logan.

2,831 1,065 2,663 770 Benton 2,442 1.962 2,418

1,672| Lonoke.

1,899 323 2,735 310 Boone. 2.054) 786 2,386 1.052|| Madison,

2,196 2,107 1,679 1,184 Bradley 1,939 123 1,571

65 Marion.

804
320

989 425 Calhoun.

818

44
704
30|| Miller
3,019 563

323 Carroll..

2,935 1,081 1,649 940||Mississippi. 5,257 616 4,835 303 Chicot. 1,592 161

1,145
75 Monroe.
1.494 1281 1,102

S2 Clark. 2,008 311 1,962 193 Montgom'y..

1,012 400 1,034 485 Clay.. 1,676 1,029 1,778 795 || Nevada..

1.399

224 1,252 204 Cleburne.

838
374 927
336|| Newton..

1,202 1,392 938 1,053 Cleveland

989
58 1,088
45|| Ouachita.

2,951 284 2,808 262 Columbia. 2,270 149 1,847

64|Perry

783 206

899

249 Conway. 2,067 272 2,013

305 Phillips

2,235 245 2,259 Craighead.. 3,300 935 3,335 ! 710 Pike.

974 424

994 283 Crawford.. 1,581 091 1,963 697 Poinsett.

4,138 670

3,457 Crittenden, 1.966

72 1,8581
22 Polk.

1.255 585 1,170 537 Cross 1,746 285 1,644

133 Pope.

3.765

769 2,678 348 Dallas,

1.295
118 1,433
103 Prairie.

1,069) 336 1,321 282 Desha. 1.370 146 1,411

55 | Pulaski

14.219 2,955 11,482 1,320 Drew.. 1,329 152 1.229 70 | Randolph.

1.687 474 1,693 Faulkner, 2,535 519 2,521

511 | Saline.

- 1,963 274 1,520 359 Franklin 1,601 319 1,890

345 Scott,

992
353 1,137

363 Fulton. 883 333 946

427 Searcy

982
1,292 767

1,010 Garland. 3,335 1.424 2,931

1,217 Sebastian.

5,249 1,908 4,539 1,161 Grant.

1,043

160
978 147 || Sevier.

1,374 293

1.200 289 Greene. 2,220 510 1,811

410|Sharp...
1,099 433 934

289 Hempstead.. 2.814 415 2,431 192 || St. Francis

1,671 192

1,938

94 Hot Spring 1,730 482 1.581

444 Stone

644
406

521 243 Howard

1,540
419 1,437 275 | Union

4,842 489 4,141 254 Indep'nce. 2,276 928 2,101 686|| Van Buren. 1,0681 402 1,422 541 Izard.

1,058 366 1.350 416 Washington, 2,873 1,819 3,378 1,579 Jackson.. 2,223 382 2,151 327

White

3.345 876 2,503 535 Jefferson. 3,829 587 3,414 224|Woodrufi..

1,280
193 1,473

253 Johnson. 1,429 318 1.432

318|| Yell...

2,236

224 2,382 318 Lafayette. 1,352

159 1.279 100 Lawrence. 2,484 852 2,230 457 Totals 158,622 42,121 146,765 32,039 Lee...

1,100
109 1.257

66
1940 (President)-Thomas, Soc., 305; Babson, Proh., 793.
1940 (Governor)-Adkins, Dem., 184,678; Stump, Rep., 16,606; McNutt, Ind., 866.
1938 (Governor)--Bailey, Dem., 120,653; McNutt, Rep., 6,729; Cole, Ind.. 11,974.
1938 (U. S. Senator) Caraway, Dem., 122,883; Atkinson, Rep., 14,290.
1936 (President)-Thomas, Soc., 446; Browder, Com., 164; Lemke, Union, 4.
1936 (U. S. Senator)--Robinson, Dem., 154,866; Ledbetter, Rep., 27,746.

PAST VOTE OF ARKANSAS 1872 (Pres.), Grant, Rep., 41,373; Greeley, Dem. 1904 (Pres.), Parker, Dem., 64,434; Roosevelt, Rep. and Lib., 37,927.

46.860; Swallow, Proh.. 993; Debs, Soc., 1.816. 1876 (Pres.), Hayes, Rep., 38,669; Tilden, Dem.,

1908 (Pres.), Bryan, Dem., 87,015; Taft. Rep., 58,071.

56.760; Chafin, Proh., 1,194; Debs. Soc., 5.842. 1880 (Pres.), Hancock, Dem., 60,775; Garfield, Rep., 42,436: Weaver, Greenback, 4,079.

1912 (Pres.), Wilson, Dem., 68,838; Taft. Rep.. 1884 (Pres.), Cleveland, Dem., 12,927; Blaine, 191€ (Pres.), Wilson, Dem., 112, 148; Hughes, Rep.

24,467; Roosevelt, Prog., 21,673. Rep.. 50,895; Butler. Greenback 1.847. 1888 (Pres.), Cleveland, Dem., 86,717; Harrison,

47.148: Hanly, Proh., 2,015; Benson, Soc., 6,999. Rep., 60,245; Fisk, Proh., 615; Streeter, United 1920 (Pres.), Cox, Dem., 107,408; Harding, Rep.. Labor, 10.761.

71,117; Debs, Soc., 5,111. 1892 (Pres.), Cleveland, Dem., 87,834; Harrison, 1924 (Pres.), Davis, Dem., 84,795: Coolidge, Rep., Rep., 46,974; Weaver, People's, 11,831; Bidwell,

40,564; LaFollette, Prog., 13,173. Proh., 120.

1928 (Pres.), Smith, Dem., 119, 196: Hoover, Rep.. 1896 (Pres.). Bryan, Dem. and People's (Populist), 77,751; Thomas, Soc., 429: Foster, Com., 317

110.103; McKinley. Rep., 37.512; Proh. 893. 1932 (Pres.), Roosevelt, Dem., 189,602; Hoover, 1900 (Pres.), Bryan, Dem., 81,091; McKinley, Rep., Rep., 28,467; Thomas, Soc., 1,269; Harvey, Ind.. 44,770; Woolley, Proh., 584; Debs, Soc., 27. 1,049; ter, Com., 175.

Arkansas or Arkansaw?

(From the Official Manual of that State) From 1844 to 1848 the State was represented in "Whereas, Confusion of practice has arisen in the United States Senate by Chester Ashley and the pronunciation of the name of our State, and it Ambrose H. Sevier. Ashley, a New Englander by is deemed important that the true pronunciation birth, always pronounced the name of the State should be determined for use in oral official prophonetically as it is spelled, “Ar-kan-sas.". Sevier, ceedings; and, a Tennesseean, the grandnephew of Col. John "Whereas, the matter has been thoroughly in. Sevier, the hero of King's Mountain and the vestigated by the State Historical Society of Little Governor of the "state of Franklin," as Tennessee Rock, which have agreed upon the correct prowas then called, always gave to the last syllable of nunciation, as derived from history and the early the name of his adopted State the pronunciation of use of the American immigrants: be it, therefore, the broad "a," as if it were spelled "Ar-kan-saw." **Resolved, by both houses of the General Assem

At that time Mr. Dallas was Vice-President, and bly, That the only true pronunciation of the name in addressing Mr. Ashley, always said, "the Senator of the State, in the opinion of this body, is that from Arkansas," while Mr. Sevier was always "the received by the French from the native Indians, Senator from Ar-kan-saw.' The opinion of the and committed to writings in the French word people differed on this subject, as did the opinions representing the sound, and that it should be of the Senators. Finally, to settle the disputation, pronounced in three syllables, with the final 's. the General Assembly of 1881 appointed a learned silent, the 'a' in each syllable with the Italian and able committee to investigate the whole sub- sound, and the accent on the first and last sylject.

lables, being the pronunciation formerly universal. This committee made & critical and exhaustively and now still most commonly used, and that the examination, and, based upon the report of this pronunciation with the accent on the second syl. committee, 'the General Assembly unanimously Table with the sound of 'a' as in 'man' and the adopted the following concurrent resolution, in sounding of the terminal 's' is an innovation to March that vear

be discouraged."

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