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Mo..

Wyo.

Ala.
6 Ga..
6 Me.

Nebr

5
Ohio.

Texas. 4 Ariz 5 Idaho. 5

Md.
4 Nev

Okla.

Utah
Ark.

6%
III..
3 Mass.

N. H

Oreg

5 Vt. Calil. 3 Ind. Mich.. 3 N. J.

3 Pa

3 Va.
Colo.
Iowå.
Minn.
N. M.

R. I..

3 Wash,
Conn.
3 Kan.

Miss.
6 N. Y

S. C.

6 W. Va. Dela Ку.

2 N. C.

S. D.

Wis
D. of C.
La
Mont. 5 N. D..

Tenn

7 Fla..

There is a Federal tax on gasoline now of 172 cents per gallon, which is in addition to the amounts set opposite the various States; that is to say where the State tax is cataloged at 4 cents there is an additional Federal tax of 112 cents which makes the total in that particular jurisdiction 512 cents. UNITED STATES MOTOR VEHICLE REGISTRATIONS-1940, 1939

Source: Federal Works Agency
State

1940
1939
State
1940 1939 State

1940 1939

NO.

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No.
No.

No.
No.

No. Ala. 347,123 331,742 Md. 450.169 430,095 Oreg

401,328 376,736 Ariz. 143,451 136,037 Mass.

907,862 874,932 Pa.

2,169, 702 2,082,862 Ark 261.997 245.707 Mich. 1,556,571 1,475,616||R. I.

189,717 177,069 Calir. 2,810,566 2,642,006 Minn, 879, 862 848,572 S. C

343,688 321.235 Colo. 355,309 345,884 Miss. 264,439 248,789 S. D.

198,615 192,111 Conn. 498,463 465,346 |Mo 926.715 881,946|| Tenn

459,170 433,982 Dela. 72,973 69,109 Mont. 196.116 185,327 | Texas

1,719.313 1,641,662 Fls. 503,678 458,615 Nebr. 417.827 411,464|| Utah.

143,634 135,935 Ga 513,097 477.713Nev 45,708 42,296 Vt.

94,472 91,407 Idaho 167,066 156,8201 N. H. 136.109 131,963 Va.

509.191 469,518 1.941,206 1,863, 486|N. J.. 1,101,213 1,041,337|Wash.

576,248 546,435 Ind 1,003,240 969,593 N. M.

128,159 123,549||W. Va

309,361 292,484 Iowa. 802,885 774.227||N. Y 2,778,312 2,689,288 Wisc.

913,055 859,173 Kan. 584,380 575,980|N. C 610, 121 587,832||Wyo

88,166 84,990 Ку. 470,825 444,218 N D

184,016 178,161 D. of Col. 165,220 167,426 La . 372,830 346.820||Ohio 1,942,639 1,910,468||At large.

3,407 2,250 Me 208,595 203,793 Okla.

585,052 565,864

Total. 32,452,86131,009,870 of the 1940 registrations, busses numbered 62,- China, 71,140; Cuba, 46,817; Denmark, 164,830; 582; trucks and tractor trucks, 4,590,386; automo- Finland, 40,000; France, 2,398,500; Germany, 327,blies (including taxi cabs) 27,372,397; trailers and 000; India, 123,400; Ireland, 67,426; Italian E. semi-trailers, 1,314,547; motorcycles, 136, 402; Africa, 60.000; Italy, 498,500; Japan, 119,050; dealers cars, 152,085.

Mexico, 105, 470; Morocco (Fr.), 37,750; NetherThe figures for 1940 are as of Jan. 1, 1941. On lands. 164,430; Netherland E. Indies, 75,015; New that date other registrations were-Alaska, 4,156; Zealand, 268, 157; Norway. 99.326. Hawaii, 72,861; Puerto Rico, 27,030; Virgin Islands, Philippines, 54,023; Portugal, 49,320; Spain, 1,046. Total, U. S. and possessions, 32,557,954. 123,300; Switzerland, 56,200; Union of So. Africa, Motor Vehicle Registration Abroad

393,698 Motor vehicle registrations abroad, Jan. 1, 1941; United Kingdom, 2,429,580; Soviet Russia,

Algeria, 35,500; Argentina, 309,500; Australia, 1,060,000;. Uruguay, 45,765; Venezuela, 35,534. 858,905; Belgium, 225, 440; Brazil, 174,000; British Total abroad, 12,818,937; world total, 45,376,891, Malaya, 49,560; Canada, 1,477,282; Chile, 50,269; compared to 45, 422,411 in 1940.

U. S. HIGHWAY APPROPRIATIONS FOR YEAR ENDED JUNE 30, 1942

Source: Federal Works Agency
Elimination

Elimination
Secon- of Hazards

Secon- of Hazards Regular dary or at Railroad

Regular dary or at Railroad State Federal Feeder Grade Cross- State

Federal Feeder Grade CrossAld Roads ings

Ald Roads

ings Dollars Dollars Dollars

Dollars Dollars Dollars Ala. 2,080, 245 364,043 406,480

N. J.

1,274,429 223,025 376,651 Ariz. 1,435,382 251,192 129.679 NM

1.620.981 283,672 170,673 Ark 1,707,928 298,887 336.619 N. Y.

4,824,597 844,304 1,330,049 Calir. 3,982,125 696,872 799,099 N. C

2,378,838 416,297 515,538 Colo 1,798,524 314.742 252.705 N. D

1,504,377 263,266 300,388 Conn. 620,997 108, 674 164,330 Ohio

3,526,168 617,079 818,286 Dela. 487.500 85,313 97,500 Okla

2,271.217 397,463 439,081 Fla. 1,425,748 249,506 299,547

Ore..

1,647.906 288,383 228,715 Ga. 2,519,366 440,889 488,535 Penn.

4,095.568 716,724 1,091,120 Idaho 1,235,985 216,297 167,025

R. I.
487,500 85,313

97.500 111 3,954,419 692,023 1,011,900

S.C.

1,341,640 234,787 297.944 Ind. 2,415,900 422,782 501,817 S. D..

1,583,613 277,132 260.078 Iowa. 2.505,523 438.467 538,808 Tenn.

2,114,507 370,039 381,156 Kan. 2,539,360 444,388 487,825 Texas

6,294,440 1,101.527 1,096,857 Ky. 1.840,894 322,156) 357,973 Utah.

1,123,714 196.650 129,466 La. 1,467.188 256,758 318,101 Vt.

487,500 85,313 97,500 Maine. 866,500 151.637 133,657 Va.

1,844,069 322,712 375,157 Md. 833,715 145,900 204,759 Wash

1,580,939 276,664 304,376 Mass 1.311.369 229,489 387,602 W. Va.

1,095,332 191,683 264,524 Mich. 3,028.316 529,955 651,077 Wisc

2,406,404 421,121 484,129 Minn. 2,709,402 474,145 525,569

1,246.353 218,112 131.610 Miss 1.773,232 310.316 314,017 D. of C.

487,500 85,313 97.500 Mo 2,967,206 519,261 580,174 Hawaii

487.500 85,313 97.500 Mont.

2,018,907 353,309 262,484 Puerto Rico.. 495,603 86,731 166,250 Nebr

1,991,356 348,487 335,670 Nevada 1,274,718 223,076 97,500

97,500,000 17,062,500 19,500,000 N. H..

487,500 85.313 97,500 Gasoline (motor fuel) consumed (sold) in the United States in 1940 totaled 24,167,190.000 gallons, as against 22,907,170,000 gallons in 1939. Losses by evaporation on the way to consumers amount to an average of more than 345 million gallons a year. New York consumption was 1,970,555,000 gallons; California, 1,948,880.000.

Wyo.

Total......

Automobile Accidents in U. S.-How Caused (1940)

Source: Travelers' Insurance Company, Hartford, Conn.

TYPES OF ACCIDENTS RESULTING IN DEATHS AND INJURIES (1940)
Pers. Per Pers.
Per

Pers. Per Pers. Per
Killed Ct. Injured Ct.

Killed Ct. Injured Ct. Collision with:

Fixed object.

3,690 10.5 98,300 7.5 Pedestrian. 12,500 35.7 290,400 22.0 Bicycle

800 2.3 43,190 3.3 Automobile. 10,400 29.7 739,590 56.0 Non-collision

5,030 14.4 113,990 8.6 Horse-drawn vehicle. 70 ..2 3,940 .3 Miscellaneous.

200 .61 5,220 Railroad train

2,070 5.9 7,880 6 Street car

140
12,270 .9

35,000 100.0 1,320,000 100.0 Other vehicle

100 .3 5.220

Total....

ACTIONS OF DRIVERS RESULTING IN DEATHS AND INJURIES (1940)

Pers. Per Pers. Per

Pers. Per Pers. Per Killed Ct. Injured Ct.

Killed Ct. Injured Ct. Exceeding speed limit 9,600 40.0 221,190 25.9 Failed to signal and imOn wrong side of road. 4,150 17.3 123,830 14.5

proper signaling.

820 3.4 80,280 9.4 Didn't have right'way 3.000 12.5 235,700 27.6 Car ran away, no driver 40 .2 850 Cutting in. .....

360 1.5) 21.350 2.5 Drove off roadway. 1,230 5.1 23.060 2.7 Passing stand. st. car, 20

1,700 .2 Reckless driving.

3,580 14.9 100,770 11.8 Passing on curve or hill 290 10,250 1.2 Miscellaneous..

620 2.6 24,700 2.9 Passing on wrong side. 290 1.2 10,250 1.2

Total..

24,000 100.0 854,000 100.0

1.2

ACTIONS OF PEDESTRIANS RESULTING IN DEATHS AND INJURIES (1940)
Ped. Per Ped. Per

Ped. Per Ped. Per
Killed Ct. Injured Ct.

Killed Ct. Injured Ct,

1.5

500

Crossing at Inter.:

Children play. street.. 650

5.2 34,850 12.0 With signal.

190
15.390 5.3 At work in road

4.0 7,840 2.7 Against signal.

740 5.9 34,560 11.9 Rid. or hitch. on veh. 120 1.0 3,490 1.2 No signal.

2,150 17.2 48,210 16.6|Coming from behind
Diagonally
210 1.7 3,490 1.2 parked car.

890
7.1

38,910) 13.4 Crossing bet. Inter. 3,950 31.6 74,630 25.7|| Walk. on rural highway 2,270

18.2

11.330 3.9 Walting for or getting

Not on roadway..

310 2.5 7,550 2.6 on or otr street car.. 40 .3 1,450 .5 Miscellaneous .

290 2.3 4.350 1.5 Standing on safety isle 50

1,160 Getting on or off other

Total..

12,500 100.00 290,400 100.0 vehicle. ....

140 1.1 3,190 1.1 of the 35,000 persons killed in 1940, infants numbered 1,190: children (5-14 yrs.), 2,870; youths and grown-ups (15-64 yrs.), 25, 410; old people (65 yrs. and over), 5,530.

of the 1,320,000 persons injured in 1940, infants totaled 47,520; children, 183,480; youths and grown-ups, 1,025,640; old people, 63,360.

of the 36,580 auto drivers in fatal accidents, 2,710 were females; of the 1,374,400 drivers in nonfatalities, 133,320 were females.

In fatal accidents, 3 per cent of the drivers were under 18 yrs., 27 per cent were aged 18-24; 3.5 per cent were 65 or over; 8 per cent had less than 3 mos, experience: 85.8 per cent of the fatal accidents occurred in clear weather, and in 77.7 per cent of the cases the road was dry; in 91.3 per cent the car was apparently in good condition. Early morning and early evening (twilight) drivers got relatively the most victims.

Speed and its relation to cost-Speed is expensive, according to the insurance experts. "Take the average speed of 35 miles per hour, says one in the booklet Lest We Regret. “If you increase that average to 45, you will save a little over six hours in every thousand miles you drive. But it will cost you 650 for each hour you save. If you jump to 55, the difference in expense would be $1.20 an hour. About $12.45 a month for the average driver!

"It is also curious to note that these costs pile up at increased speeds somewhat after the startling fashion of Danger Units. After passing 45, for instance, you will save less and less time by increasing your speed; yet the expense soars. On a 1,000-mile journey you could save but 2.8 hours by stepping up your speed from 55 to 65, and you would pay almost $3.00 an hour for the time you saved."

4.3

Deaths in U. S. from Automobile Accidents Source: United States Bureau of the Census; figures in the table exclude deaths due to collisions with trains and street cars, and do not include deaths in motorcycle accidents.

These appear in the data beneath the table. Year Deaths) Rate Year Deaths Rate Year Deaths Rate Year Deaths Rate 1912. 1.758 2.9 1919. 7.968 9.4 1926. 18,871 18.0 1933. 29,323 23.3 1913. 2,488 3.9 1920. 9,103

10.4 1927 21,160 19.6 1934, 33,980 26.8 1914. 2,826 1921 10.168 11.4

1928

23,765 20.8 1935. 34,183 26.8 1915. 3,978 5.9 1922. 11,666 12.4 1929. 27,066 23.3 1936. 35,761 27.8 1916. 5,193 7.3 1923 14,411 14.7

1930. 29.080 24.5 1937 37.205 28.8 1917

6.724 9.0 1924. 15.529 15.5 1931 30,042 25.2 1938. 30,504 23.5 1918

7,525 9.3 1925... 17,571 17.1 11932 28,350 21.9 11939 32,386 24.8 Auto-train deaths-(1933) 1,437; (1934), 1,457; (1935) 1,587; (1936) 1,697; (1937) 1,810; (1938) 1,489. Auto-street car fatalities -(1933; 318;" (1934) 332; (1935) 253; (1936) 269;'(1937) 264; (1938) 165. Motorcycle deaths-(1933) 235; (1934) 332; (1935) 346; (1936) 362; (1937) 364; (1938) 369.

Canadian Motor Vehicle Production Combined 110,126 units, an increase of 1.6 per cent as comoutput of passenger cars in the United States and pared with 108,369 in 1939. Canada totaled 3,802,454 units, an increase of 28 The United States and Canada manufactured per cent as compared with 2,975,165 in 1939. Most 889,884 trucks and buses in 1940, an increase of of the increase was accounted for in the United 17.5 per cent as compared with 757,553 in 1939. States, where production increased to 3,692,328 Output in the United States numbered 777,026, units from 2,866,796 units in 1939, or a gain of against 710,496 in 1939, a gain of 9 per cent; while about 29 per cent.

Canadian production numbered 112,858, against Output of passenger cars in Canada totaled | 47,057, an increase of 140 per cent,

The American Merchant Marine
Source: Bureau of Marine Inspection and Navigation, U. Ş. Dept. of Commerce
Licensed Vessels Under 20 Gross Tons Total Merchant Marine (Gross Tons)

Year (Fiscal)

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No. Tons No. Tons No. Tons NO. Tons No. Tons

No. Tone 1915. 3,045 34,248 7,514 98,913 10,559 133,161 10.753 2,445,619 15,948 5.943,810 26,701 8,389,429 1920 2.113 24.710 7.735 105,411 9,848 130,121 9.369 2.500,575 18,814 13.823,449 28,183 16,324,024 1925 1,295 15,809 7,587 108,540 8,882 124,349 7.730 2,429,509 18,637 14,976,393 26,367 17,405,902 1926. 1.240 14,917 7.619 110,444 8.859 125.361 7,654 2,467,927 18,689 14.848.220 26,343 17,311,147 1927. 1,130 13,717 7,440 108,852 8,570 122,569 7,394 2,380.652 18,384 14,506.849 25,778 16,887,501 1928.

1,048 12,780 7,357 108,437 8,405 121,217 7,115 2.336,382 18,270 14,346,679 25,385 16,683,061 1929

950 11,280 7,372 109,867) 8,322 121.147 7.007 2,315,022 18,319 14.161.837 25,326 16,476,859 1930.

904 10,877 7.363 109.991 8,267 120.868 6,099 2,299,857 19,115 13,767,868 25,214 16,067,725 1931

842 10,360 7.434 110,951 8,276 121,311 7,235 2.380,237 18,236 13,528,019 25,471 15,908, 256 1932.

809 9.829 7,496 112,064 8,305 121,893 6,932 2,270,830 18,224 13,567.825 25,156 15,838,655 1933. 519 6,183 7.687 114,134 8,206 120,317 6,686 2,197,91718,182 12,862,240 24,868 15,060,157 1934.

710 8,723 7,901 116,446 8,611 125,169 6,571 2,185,682 18.333 12,676.132 24,904 14,861,814 1935

675 8.378 8,100 118,622 8,775 127,000 6.424 2,118,499 18,495 12,535,257 24,919 14,653,759 1936

696 8.601 9,161 132,800 8,857 141,407 6,686 2,230,126 18,706 12,266,561 25,392 14,496,687 1937

819 9.968 9.493 137.213 10,312 147.181 7,569 2,508,554 19,019 12.167.574 26,588 14,676,128 1938 620 9.804 10.051 147,011 10,671 156,815 7.806 2,644,288 19,349 12,007,077 27,155 14,651,365 1939

579) 8.754 10.413|152,046 10,992 160.800 7,864 2,679,988 19.606 11,952,003 27,470 14,631,991 1940

(Data not available) 11.067 160,048 7.708 2,665,446 19.504 11,352,742 27,212 14,018,188 1941 (Jan.) 4991 7.225/10.6371153,967 11,136 161,192 7,693 2,674.792 19,382 11,046,822 27,075 13,721,614

Included in the above on Jan. 1, 1941, were 38 canal boats (5,961 gross tons) and 7,138 barges (2,487,121 gross tons). Motor boats, included in steam, numbered 15,586 (1,233,284 gross tons).

The figures are no longer compiled on a fiscal year basis, but are now on a calendar year basis. Those for 1941 are as of Jan. 1.

The war has brought many changes and some confusion in classifications and ownerships, owing principally to changes in registration from one country to another.

Tonnage of Vessels Entered and Cleared at United States Ports

Source: U.S. Bureau of Foreign and Domestic Commerce
Total

Total

1938

American
Foreign

American

Foreign Year

Year (Fiscal) Net Per

Net
Per (Fiscal) Net

Per
Net

Per
Tons Ct. Tons

Ct.
Tons Ct. Tons

Ct. 1900. 12,344,570 22 44,099,576 78 1934 45,920.623 36 80,335,916 1910. 17,697,062 22 62,244,602 78 1935. 44,932,470 35 82,269.688 65 1920. 55,239,879 51 52,253,160 49 1936 43,325,347 33 87,391,668 67 1925. 57.733, 259 42 81,134,736 58

1937

39,389,412 29 98.779,828 71 1930. 64,233,114 39 100,679,741 61

39,676,370 27 105,617,806 73 1931.

59,007,223 38 96,519.327 62 1939 35,634.839 25 104,434,695 75 1932. 52,811.191 37 89,919,168 63 1940 38,809,334 20

93,277,545 71 1933.... 44,793,879 37 76,600,674 63

Gross tonnage applies to vessels and not to cargoes, and is determined by dividing by 100 the contents, in cubic feet, of the vessel's closed-in space.

Net tonnage is a vessel's gross tonnage minus deductions of space occupied by the crew's quarters, machinery for navigation, the engine room, storeroom and fuel.

The number of entrances practically balances the number of clearances, so that one-half of the total figures approximates either the entrances or the clearances.

50 Greatest Ports of the World
Source: United States Bureau of Foreign and Domestic Commerce
Net

Net
Rank
Port
Vessels Register Rank

Port

Vessels! Register No. Tons

No. Tons New York (Upper Bay) 92,032 68,598.000 26 Vancouver, Canada

16,970 11,488,000 2 London 29,137 29,673,000 27 Rio de Janeiro.

3,924 11,226,000 3 Kobe 26,776 28,334,000 28 Genoa

5,421 10,860,000 Yokohama 5,757 26,785,000 29 Naples

9,008 10,809,000 5 Rotterdam 110,406 22,415,000/ 30 Houston

7,275 10,091,000 6 Baltimore. 56,067 21,008,000 31 Sydney, Australla.

6,855 10,057,000 7 Colombo 2,708 20,425,000 32 Newcastle (England)

8,532 8,596,000 8 Osaka 18,999 19,600,000 33 Montreal

5,725 8,516,000 9 Antwerp 11.125 18,730,000 34 Bremen,

7,118 8,300,000 10 Hamburg 16,141 18,418,000 35 Seattle

3,416 8,210,000 11 Philadelphia 8,302 17,907,000 36 Montevideo

1,631 8,087,000 12 Shanghai 8,488 17,418,000 37 Piraeus

13,396) 7,758,000 13 Los Angeles 5,369 17.211,000 38 Melbourne

3,396 7,613,000 Liverpool 14,614 16,640,000 39 Copenhagen

25,432 7,452,000 15 Marseille 9,135 16,612,000 40 Portland, Oreg

9,548 7,051,000 16 Hong Kong 5,947 15,340.000 41 Bombay

33,731 6,547,000 Boston.. 7.340 14,978,000 42 Cherbourg

952 6,478,000 18 San Francisco. 17,35314,974,000 43 Capetown

1,629 5,454,000 19 Singapore 5,934 14,800,000 44 Galveston

1,762 5,383,000 20 Buenos Aires 14,826 13,435,000 45 Batavia

2,1831 5,338,000 21 New Orleans 16,28713,319,000 46 Jacksonville

1,810 4,523,000 22 Duluth Superior 2,807 12,882,000 47 Savannah

1,395 4,075,000 23 Bouthampton 15,628 12,509,000 48 Calcutta

1,296 4,059,000 24 Nortolk. 7,08912,222,000 49 Curacao

5,047 3.700.000 Havre 9,018/11,572,000 50 Charleston, S. (

10.668 3,226,000 The data cover entrances in 1935; there is no later available comparative information.

Data for ports in the United States are compiled by the Department of Commerce, and by the Chief of Engineers. War Department.

[graphic]

July

Balance of Trade Under Tariff Acts

Source: United States Tariff Commission
Act of

Years
Imports

Exports Av. Excesslmp. Av. Excess Exp. July 4, 1789.

1790 $23,000,000 $20,205,156 $2,794,844 Aug. 10, 1790.

1791-1792

60,700,000 39,765,139 10,467,430 May 2, 1792

1793-1794 65,700,000 59,153,297 3,273,351 June 7, 1794.

1795-1812 1,523,538,964 1,213,983,049 17,197,551 July 1, 1812

1813-1816 295,114,274 169,261,263 31,464,253 April 27, 1816.

1817-1824 686,033,674 608,707.242 9,728,304 May 22, 1824

1825-1828 349,308,444 331,720,223 4,397,055 May 19, 1828.

1829-1832 349,589,837 314,695.705 8,723,533 July 14, 1832

1833 108,118,311 90,140,433 17,977,878 March 2, 1833

1834-1842 1,218,445,645 1,060,257,281 17,576,485 Aug. 30, 1842 1843-1846 348,333,077 423,681,648

$18,589,648 July 30, 1846 1847-1857 2,336,430,244 2,512,765,531

16,030,481 March 3, 1857. 1858-1861 1,170,440,593 1,330.901,092

40,115,125 March 2, 1861 1862 178,330,200 227,558,141

49,227,941 July 14, 1862 1863-1864 526,488,602 532,355,587

2,933,492 June 30, 1964 1865-1870 2,176,889,958 2,193,871,147

2,830,198 July 14, 1870 1871-1872 1,059,359,997 1,065,317,286

2,978,644 June 6, 1872. 1873-1883 6,235,725,983 7,313,389,153

97,969,379 March 3, 1883 1884-1890 4,758,262,722 5,080,073,791

45,973,010 Oct. 1, 1890 1891-1894 3,112,621,836 3,588,238,021

118,904.046 Aug. 27, 1894. 1895-1897 2,280,107,204 2,688,606,689

136,164,495 24, 1897 1898-1909 11,981.155,035 | 17,964,809,699

498,645,389 Aug. 5, 1909. 1910-1913 6,482,467,103 8,322,459,209

459,998.026 Oct. 3, 1913. 1914-1922 27,279,046,087 48.480.705.084

2,355,739,889 Sept. 22, 1922 1923-1930 31, 795,962.536 36,846,025,405

631,257.859 June 18, 1930. 1935-1940 20,975,720,402 25,777,663,650

480,194,325! 42,642,252 Telephones in World, Jan. 1, 1940

Source: American Telephone and Telegraph Company
Countries

Total
Countries

Total

Countries Total North America: Europe:

Other Europe.

571,830 United States. 20,830,950 Belgium

430,000 Total..

15,766,994 Canada. 1,397.272 Bulgaria

31,225 Asla: Central America 32,680 Denmark 459,757 British India.

83,378 Mexico 175,600 Eire

45,513 China.

160,000 West Indies:

Finland
185,456 Japan

1,367,958 Cuba. 57,072 France 1,589,595 Other Asia.

310,183 Puerto Rico 16,758 Germany 4,226,504 Total.

1,921,499 Other W. I

29,287 Gt. Brit. and No. Ire. 3,375,902 Alrica: Other N. A. 19,108 Greece

54,404 Egypt

67,983 Total 22.558,727 Hungary

179, 115 Union South Africa 220,288 South America:

Itay.
650,000 Other Africa..

142,428 Argentina 434,017 Latvia

83,650 Total..

430,699 Bolivia 2,611 Lithuania

26,591 Oceania: Brazil. 272,728 Netherlands 460,000 Australia.

661,996 Chile 84,151 Norway 250,000 Hawail

37,154 Colombia 41.687 Portugal

72,872 Netherlands Indies. 52,813 Ecuador 7.650 Roumania 102,268 New Zealand

217,869 Paraguay. 3.658 Russia.

1,272,500 Philippine Islands. 32,796 Peru... 32,286 Spain. 300,000 Other Oceania.

5,593 Uruguay 46,656 Sweden 864,799 Total.

1,008, 221 Venezuela 28,650 Switzerland

462,013 Other So. Am 3,018 Yugoslavia.

72,000 Total World. 42,642,252 Total

957,112

[graphic]

TELEPHONES IN LARGE CITIES Telephones in chief cities–New York, 1,669,904; Chicago, 997, 174; Los Angeles, 456,564; Cleveland, 264,560; San Francisco, 290,990; Washington, 254,042; Minneapolis, 155,362; Seattle, 129,613; Denver, 108,244. Buenos Aires, 268,956; Rio de Janeiro, 103,797; Mexico City, 95,673; Montevideo, 33,447.

Brussels, 127,639 Copenhagen, 220,202; Dublin, 24,893; Paris, 437,139; Berlin, 599,911; Hamburg,
188,861; Vienna, 180, 166; London, 717,468; Budapest, 107,906; 'Rome. 122,442; 'Amsterdam, 67,927
Oslo, 73,786; Stockholm, 184,722.
Sydney, 159,825; Melbourne, 135,518; Shanghai, 79,554; Tokio, 290,510; Manila, 25,715.
TELEPHONE CONVERSATIONS AND TELEGRAMS, 1939 OR 1938
Tele-

Tele-
Country
Talks grams
Total Country

Talks

grams Total 1.000 1,000 1,000

1,000 1,000 1,000 Australia. 637,000 17.998 654,998 Hungary

187.000 2,439 189,439 Belgium 320,000 5.900 325,900 Japan.

5,339.000 68,475 5,407,475 Canada 2,774,000 11,629 2,785,629 Netherlands

468,000 3,588 471,588 Denmark 726,000 1,748 727,748 Norway,

281.000 3,489 284,489 Finland

309,000
811 309,811 Sweden

1,195.000 4,641 1,199.641 France. 972,000 27.524 999,524 Switzerland.

335.000 2,039 337.039 Germany

3.640,000 21.701 3,661,701 Union of S. Africa. 317.000 6,863 323,863 Gt. Brit., No. Ire.. 2,255,000 59,484 2,314,484 | United States. 30,300,000 195.000 30,495,000

[graphic]

Nieman Fellowships to Harvard

Source: An official of the fund Under the terms of the Lucius W. Nieman and and the fund was set up under the will of his Agnes Wahl Nieman Fund about $1,000,000 was widow. Harvard established fellowships providing bequeathed to Harvard in 1937 "to promote and working newspapermen, of at least 3 years' experielevate the standards of journalism in the United ence, the opportunity for a year's unrestricted states and educate persons deemed specially study while on leave from their papers. The qualified for journalism." Mr. Nieman was the amount of each fellowship equals each individual's founder and publisher of the Milwaukee Journal salary.

Mineral Products of U.S. and Chief Producing States

Source: The Bureau of Mines, Washington
Chief States

Product

Product

Chief States

Aluminum.
N. Y., Tenn., N. C.

Mica.

N. C., Va., Calif., Ga. Antimonial lead Not separable by States

Scгар..

N. C., Va., Calif., Ga. Antimony ore. Id., Alaska, Calif., Nev. Sheet

N. C., Conn., N. H., S. D. Arsenious oxide. Mont., Utah

Millstones. Asbestos..

Vt., Ariz., Ga., N. C., Md. Mineral paints (zinc and Asphalt:

lead pigments)..

Penn., Kan., II., Ind. Native.

Ky., Texas, Ala., Okla. Mineral waters.
Oil..
Not separable by States Molybdenum.

Colo., Utah., Ariz., N. M.
Barite (crude).
Mo., Ga., Calif., Tenn.
Natural gas.

Texa, Calll., La., Okla. Bauxite Ark., Ala., Ga.

Natural gasoline, Texas., Calli., Okla., La. Bismuth. Not separable by States Nickel.

Not separable by States Bitumen (natural sulton

Oilstones, etc

Ohio, N. H., Ind., Ark.
ated)
Utah
Olivine.

N. C.
Borates
Calif., Nev.

Ores (crude), etc.:
Bromine.
N.C., Mich., Calif., W. Va. Copper.

Ariz., Utah., Nev., Mich. Cadmium

Not separable by States Dry and siliceous (gold Cadmium compounds. Not separable by States and silver)

Alaska, Calif., Nev., S. D. Calcium magnesium

Lead.

Mo., Id., Utah, Mont. chloride.. Mich., W. Va., Ohio

Lead-copper

N. M., Colo., Utah, Nev. Cement. Penn., Calif., Mich.,jN. Y. Zinc.

Okla., Kan., Tenn., N. J. Chats. Okla., Mo., Kan.

Zinc-copper

Ariz.
Chromite.
Calif., Oreg.

Zinc-lead

Okla., Kan., Id., Va. Clay:

Peat.

N. Y., N. J., Mich., Calll. Products (other than

Pebbles for grinding Calll., Minn. pottery & refractories)..

Petroleum.

Texas, Calif., Okla., Ill. Raw (sold by pro l'ers).Ga., Penn. (Calif., Mo. Phosphate rock

Fla., Tenn., Mont., Id. Coal:

Platinum & allied metals. Alaska, Calif., Oreg,
Bituminous.
W. Va., Penn., III., Ky, Potassium salts..

N. M, Calif., Md., Utah
Penn, anthracite
Penn.
Pumice.

Kan., Calif., Nebr.
Coke.
Penn., N. Y., Ohio., Ind. Pyrites.

Tenn., Va., N. Y., Calll.
Copper, ,
Ariz., 'Utah, Mont., Nev. Salt.

Mich., N. Y., Ohio, La. Diatomite. Calif., Oreg., Wash., Nev. Sand and gravel.

N. Y., Calif.,

Wash,
Feldspar (crude)
N. C., S. D., Colo., N. H.

Mich.
Ferro-alloys.
Penn., N. Y., Ohio, Va. Sand-lime brick

N. Y., Minn., N. J., Mich. Flint lining for tube mills Minn

Selenium)..

Not separable by States Fluorspar... III., Ky., N. M., Colo. Silica (quartz)

Wisc., Ohio, Calif., N. C. Fuller's earth

Ga., Texas, III., Fla. Silica sand & sandstone
Garnot (abrasive),
N, Ý, N. C., N, H, Vt. (ground)

Ill., N. J., Penn., Ohio Gems and precious stones No canvass

Silver.

Id., Utah, Colo., Mont.. Gold

Calii., Alaska, S, D., Colo. Slate..
Graphite:

Sodium salts (other than
Amorphous.
Nev., Ga.

NaCl) (natural). Calif., Texas, Wyo., Utah
Crystalline.
New York
Stone...

Penn., N. Y., Ohio, Mich. Grindstones, pulpstones. . Ohio, W. Va., Wash, Sulfur.

Texas., La., Calif., Utah Gypsum (crude)

N. Y., Mich., Iowa, Texas Sulfuric acid from copper
Helium
Texas

and zinc smelters and
Iodine (natural)
Calll.

roasters and from roastIron:

ing of high-sulfide gold Ore.

Minn., Ala., Mich., Penn. and silver concentrates .. Penn., Ill., Tenn., Ariz.
Pig
Penn., Ohio., Ind., III. Sulfur ore..

Nev., Colorado
Sinter.
Tenn.

Talc and ground soap
Kyanite.
Calif., Ga., Va., N. C. stone..

N. Y., Vt., Calif., N. C.
Lead..
Mo., Idaho, Utah, Okla. Tantalum ore.

S. D., N. M., Wyo.
Limne.
Ohio, Penn., Mo., W. Va. | Tallurium

Not separable by States
Lithiurn minerals
S.D., Calir.

Alaska, S. D. Mont.. Magnesite (crude) Wash., Calif., Nev., Vt.

N. M.
Magnesium..
Mich.

Titanium ore:
Magnesium salts (nat.) Mich., Nev., Calif., Wash. Ilmenite.

Va., Calit.
Manganese ore.
Mont., Tenn., Ga., Ark. Rutile.

Va.. Ark.
Manganiferous ore.. Minn., N. M., Colo., Ga. Tripoli.

IU., Mo., Okla., Ark. Manganiferous zinc resi

Tungsten ore

Nev., Calif., Idaho, Colo. duum. N. J.

Uranium and vanadium Mart:

ores.

Ariz., Colo., Utah
Calcareous.
W. Va., Va., Nev., Wis. Vermiculite.

Mont., Colo., Wyo., N. C.
Greensand.
N. J.

Okla., N. J., Kan., Id. Mercury

Calif., Oreg., Idaho, Nev.

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Zinc..

Yr. Cal.

Gua- Africa

1906.. 1907.. 1908.. 1909.. 1910.. 1911.. 1912. 1913. 1914.. 1915. . 1916.. 1917.. 1918.. 1919. 1920.. 1921.. 1922, 1923..

World Production of Rubber

Source: United States Department of Commerce
Mexi-

Mexi-
Middle Ama- can

Yr. Middle Ama- can
East

Africa
Gua-

Total
zon

Cal. East
zon

Total
Valley yule

Valley yule
Long Long Long
Long Long

Long Long Long Long Long tong

tons
tons
tons
tong

tong tons tons tons tons 2,879| 34,274 1,624 20,539 62.711||1924. . 394,037 23.165 1.356 5,416 425,991 7,785 36.817 3,844 18,883 73,783|1925.. 488,82525,298 3,781 7,778 528,485 5,145/ 37.420 4,8501 15,096 69,550|1926.. 581,443 24,298 4,305 8,713 621,757 5,556 38,874 7,533 18,593 78,170|1927.. 562, 252) 28,782 5,019 8.160 606,667 10,979| 37,938 9.542 20,143 94,013|1928.. 622,018 21.129 3,076 6.124 653.837 17,501 35,970 7.172 18,283 94,055|1929.. 835,252 21,148 1,275 4,596 863,267 33,306 41,619 6,192 18,918 114.276 1930.. 802,082 14,260 1,095 3,961 821,914 53,644 35,659 1,969 15,986 120.123||1931.. 782,909 12.121

3,072 798,324 74,328 33,001 265 7,719 122,914|1932. 700.239 6,420

1,751 708,449 116,370 34,610 1,386 8,138 170,826||1933. . 838.836 9,883

2,098 851,456 161,842 30.997 283 10,372 214,089|1934. . 1,004,253 8,903 398 2.921 1,016,509 221, 452) 33.461 1,026 10,446 278,140 1935. . 855,038 11,275 459 5,031 872,413 181,061 22,303 1,799 7,122 219.684 1936.. 833,656/ 14,216 1.228 6,122 856,376 348,990 32, 726 1,083

7,021 399.731 1937.. 1,108.717 15,576 2,691 7,882 1,135.398 305,106) 23,216 982 6,402 341,994 - 1938.. 864,098 14,293 2,485 7,919 889,438 277,516) 17,164 29 3,494 301,512 1939. . 985,141 13.968 1.914 16.090 1.017.458 379,520 19,542

275

2,941 406.3941 1940.. 1,353,052 17,661 3,634 16.314 1,390,661 380,0581 16,765 1.2241 5,5861 408.64111

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