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Fig. 34.-S 6 Independent Brake-Valve. Sectional elevation, plan

view of rotary-valve seat, and transparent plan view of rotary valve.

100g by Ti.

the latter position the coil spring within the valve body is again encountered; some force is necessary to bring the handle to the quick application position, and when the hand is removed the brake-valve will rotate back to the slow-application position.

Like the automatic brake-valve, the S-6 Independent Brake-Valve is removable for repair, etc., without any pipe joints having to be disconnected. Fig. 32 shows the valve complete; and in Fig. 33 it is shown separated into the brake-valve proper, and the lower section, or pipe bracket, which carries the supporting stud-bolt.

Fig. 34 shows a vertical section through the INDEPENDENT BRAKE-VALVE, and a horizontal section through the valve body on the plåne of the rotary-valve seat, with rotary valve removed and shown aside as a transparent, top or plan view. In the sectional views the pipe connections and positions of the handle are indicated. The names of the parts are:

2, PIPE BRACKET; 3, ROTARY-VALVE SEAT; 4, VALVE BODY; 5, RETURN-SPRING CASING; 6, RETURN SPRING; 7, COVER; 8, CASING SCREW; 9, ROTARY VALVE; 10, ROTARY-VALVE KEY; II, ROTARY-VALVE SPRING; 12, KEY WASHER; 13, UPPER CLUTCH; 14, HANDLE NUT; 15, HANDLE; 16, LATCH SPRING; 17, LATCH SCREW; 18, LATCH; 19, COVER SCREW; 20, OIL PLUG; 21, BOLT AND NUT; 22, BRACKET STUD; 23, BRACKET-STUD Nut; 24, UPPER GASKET; 25,

Independent Brake-Valve. Details LOWER GASKET; 26, LOWER CLUTCH; 27, RETURNSPRING STOP; 28, CAP SCREW.

Unlike the automatic brake-valve, the air-pressure supply does not pass up through a port in the different sections of the INDEPENDENT BRAKE-VALVE BODY and come upon the rotary valve direct; this reducing-valve pressure (45 pounds), from its pipe connection with the bracket section, flows up through a passage to port

b and its channelled extension in the rotary-valve seat that connects with port e in the rotary valve in all positions; port e includes a groove in the face of the rotary valve and a port extending vertically through it, by means of which the reducing-valve pressure flows to the top of the rotary valve at all times, thus holding it to its seat. Port a leads to that section of the distributing-valve release pipe that goes to the distributing valve (connection IV-distributing-valve charts), and port c leads to the other section of this pipe that goes to the automatic brake-valve (connection IIIFig. 23). Port d leads to the application-cylinder pipe to the distributing valve (connection II-dist.-valve charts). Port h in the center of the rotary-valve seat is the exhaust port, leading directly down to the atmosphere beneath the brake-valve. The "warning port," k, also leads to the atmosphere. The long, radial groove, g, in the face of the rotary valve is always in communication with the atmosphere through its per

manent connection with the central exhaust port, h. Port m in the face of the rotary valve is connected with the channel, e, by a small, interior port. F is a channelled cavity in the face of the valve; and I is a port through the rotary valve from top to face, where it is extended as a short groove.

In Figs. 35, 36, 37, 38, and 39, the functions of the INDEPENDENT BRAKE-VALVE in its five operative positions are exemplified by views of the rotary valve as transparencies, and, through it, the rotaryvalve seat. In connection with this study, reference should be made to the piping diagram, and distributingvalve chart, that represent the effects of operation of the brake-valve in each position as taken up.

The red lines indicate ports and cavities in the ROTARY VALVE, the unbroken lines representing ports that pass clear through the valve from top to face; dotted lines indicate cavities that are channelled out in the face of the valve; and dot-and-dash lines indicate passages in the interior of the rotary valve that are used to connect facing ports. The ports and cavities in the ROTARYVALVE SEAT are shown in black lines.

Referring to Fig. 35, Release Position of the Independent Brake-Valve: the groove in the rotary-valve seat that is a part of the “reducing-valve pressure” port is always in connection with the large port, e, through the rotary valve, either directly or through the groove

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