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him, and, in short, sticks at nothing that may establish his character of a wit.' It is no wonder therefore he succeeds in it better than the man of humanity, as a person who makes use of indirect methods is more likely to grow rich than the fair trader.

L.

ADDISON,

INDEX.

No.
Action, the felicity of the soul.......

116
Affliction and sorrow, not always expressed by tears.. 95
True affliction labours to be invisible....

95
Age, the unnatural misunderstanding between age and
youth.........

153
The authority of an aged virtuous person prefera-
ble to the pleasures of youth.

153
Albacinda, her character..

144
Alexander, his artifice in his Indian expedition..... 127

His answer to those who asked him if he would

not be a competitor for the prize in the Olym-
pic games.

157
Amaryllis, her character..

144
Ambition, the occasion of factions...

125
Animals, the different make of every species.......... 120
The instinct of brutes...

120
Exemplified in several instances..........

120
God himself the soul of brutes...

121
The variety of arms with which they are provided
by nature......

121
Amusements of life, when innocent, necessary and al-
lowable

93
Apparitions, the creation of weak minds..

110
Arable (Mrs.) the great heiress, the Spectator's fellow-
traveller...

132
Aristotle, his account of the world...

166
Aristus and Aspasia, a happy couple........

128
Artist, wherein he has the advantage of an author....... 166
Association of honest men proposed by the Spectator.. 126
Author: in what manner one author is a mole to an-
other..........

124
Wherein an author has the advantage of an artist 166

No.

Author: the care an author ought to take of what he

writes ......
A story of an atheistical author...............

166
166

BAREFACE, his success with the ladies, and the reason
for it....

156
Bear-Garden, the Spectator's method for the improve-
ment of it.

141
Beauties, whether male or female, very untractable.... 87
And fantastical....

144
Impertinent and disagreeable

144
The efficacy of beauty

144
Board-wages, the ill effects of it...

88
Bodily exercises, of ancient encouragement..

161
Books reduced to their quintessence

124
The legacies of great geniuses..

166
Burnet (Dr.) some passages in his Theory of the Earth
considered....

143, and 146

CÆSAR (Julius) his reproof to an ill reader..

147
Cambray (thé bishop of) his Education of a Daughter
recommended....

95
Cant, from whence said to be derived..

147
Care: what ought to be a man's chief care....

122
Carneades, the philosopher, his definition of beauty.... 144
Cassius, the proof he gave of his temper in his child-
hood..

157
Castle-builders, who, and their follies exposed.. 167
Censure, a tax, by whom paid to the public, and for
what..

101
Chaplain, the character of Sir Roger de Coverley's.. 106
Chastity, the great point of honour in women.

99
Cheerfulness of temper, how to be obtained and pre-
served

143
Children, wrong measures taken in the education of
the British children

157
Children in the Wood, a ballad, wherein to be com-
mended..

85
Church-yard, the country change on Sunday

112
Common-prayer, some considerations on the reading
of it..

147
The excellency of it

147
Compassion, the exercise of it would tend to lessen the
calamities of life...

169

No.
Compliments in ordinary discourse censured..

103
Exchange of compliments...

155
Conde (prince of) his face like that of an eagle......... 86
Connecte (Thomas) a monk in the 14th century, a

zealous preacher against the women's commodes
in those days....

98
Contentment, the utmost good we can hope for in this
life.

163
Conversation, usually stuffed with too many mpli-
ments

103
What properly to be understood by the word con-
versation

143
Cotillus, his great equanimity.,

143
Coverley (Sir Roger de) he is something of an hu-
mourist.....

106
His choice of a chaplain.....

106
His management of his family.

107
His account of his ancestors.

109
Is forced to have every room in his house exor-
cised by his chaplain

110
A great benefactor to his church in Worcester-
shire......

112
In which he suffers no one to sleep but himself ... 112
He gives the Spectator an account of his amours,
and the character of his widow..

113, 118
The trophies of his several exploits in the coun-
try..

115
A great fox-hunter...

116
An instance of his good-nature.

116
His aversion to confidants...

118
The manner of his reception at the assizes.... 123
Where he whispers the judge in the ear..

122
His adventure when a school-boy..

125
A man for the landed interest...

126
His adventure with some gipsies.......

130
Rarely sports near his own seat.

131
Country, the charms of it

118
Country gentleman and his wife, neighbours to Sir

Roger, their different tempers described. 128
Country Sunday, the use of it..

112
Country wake described ..

161
Courage recommends a man to the female sex more
than any other quality

.99
One of the chief topics in books of chivalry ......... 99

...........

82

No.
Courage: false courage..

99
Mechanic courage, what

152
Cowley, his magnanimity.

114
Coxcombs, generally the women's favourites....... 128
DEATH, the contemplation of it affords a delight mixed
with terror and sorrow..

133
Intended for our relief.

133
Deaths of eminent persons the most improving
passages in history.

133
Debt, the ill state of such as run in debt
Decency, nearly related to virtue ..

104
Demurrers, what sort of women so to be called.

89
Devotion, the great advantage of it..

93
The most natural relief in our affictions.

163
Dick Crastin challenges Tom Tulip...

91
Disappointinents in love, the most difficult to be con-
quered of any other,..

163
Dissenters, their canting way of reading.

147
Dissimulation, the perpetual inconvenience of it........ 103
Duelling, a discourse against it......

84
Pharamond's edict against it .......

97
Duration, the idea of it how obtained, according to
Mr. Locke.......

94
Different beings may entertain different notions
of the same parts of duration ........

94
EDUCATION : an ill method observed in the educating
our youth.....

157
Eminent men, the tax paid by them to the public..... 101
Englishman, the peculiar blessing of being born one... 135
The Spectator's speculations upon the English
tongue

135
English not naturally talkative......... 135 and 148
The English tongue much adulterated

165
Epaminondas, his honourable death..

133
Ephraim, the quaker, the Spectator's fellow-traveller
in a stage-coach....

132
His reproof to a recruiting officer in the same
coach...

132
And advice to him at their parting.......

132
Equanimity, without it we can have no true taste of life 143
Equestrian order of ladies.......

104
Its origin .......

104

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