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THE YEAR 1800,

OR

THE SAYINGS AND DOINGS OF OUR FATHERS AND MOTHERS

60 YEARS AGO.

As Recorded in the Newspapers and other periodicals.

Consisting of Extracts from-

THE TIMES, MORNING CHRONICLE, MORNING HERALD, ST. JAMES'S CHRONICLE, MORNING POST
AND GAZETTEER, LONDON CHRONICLE, STAR, PORCUPINE, TRUE BRITON, LONDON GAZETTE,
LLOYD'S EVENING POST, OBSERVER, BELL'S WEEKLY MESSENGER, READING

OXFORD GAZETTE, JOURNAL DES DÉBATS, ANNUAL
REGISTER, GENTLEMAN'S MAGAZINE, EUROPEAN MAGAZINE,

scoTS' MAGAZINE, AND UNIVERSAL MAGAZINE.

MERCURY AND

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AUTHOR OF

THE CHART OF THE NAVY OF GREAT BRITAIN FROM THE EARLIEST PERIOD OF HISTORY."

London :
THOMAS SANDERSON, 77, FLEET STREET, E.C.,
EDINBURGH : W. P. NIMMO. DUBLIN : Mc GLASHEN & GILL. GLASGOW : H. CAMPBELL.

LIVERPOOL: W. GILLING. MANCHESTER : DINHAM & Co.

AND TO BE HAD AT ALL BOOKSELLERS AND RAILWAY STATIONS.

1860.

226. 6. 2G.

Just published by the same Author,

A SECOND EDITION OF THE

CHART OF THE NAVY OF GREAT BRITAIN FROM THE EARLIEST

PERIOD OF HISTORY,

COMPILED FROM HISTORIOAL PUBLICATIONS, OLD RECORDS, PARLIAMENTARY RETURNS, AND OTHER AUTHORITIES.

OPINIONS OF THE PRESS.

Among recent statistical publications is A Chart This is a compilation of the various events con. of the Navy. It has been condensed with much skill nected with the Naval History of Great Britain, and clearness, and is calculated to prove highly commencing in the last century B.C. down to the year useful. Details are embraced of all the changes and 1857. It is the first attempt which we remember to reconstructions” of the Royal Navy from the reign have seen, of collecting and publishing, in the form of Henry VIII, together with a general view of the of a Chart, a comprehensive record of events in our increase of the mercantile marine.Times, July 5, Naval history. Mr. Perigal deserves great credit for 1859.

the manner in wbich he has produced this first This Chart exhibits at a glance the rise and pro- edition, and we hope that the publication will receive gress of the Royal Navy, showing its total force in the extent of support to which it is fairly entitled. each reign, and the numbers of ships in the several The Artizan, August 1, 1859. rates since the system of classification was adopted Mr. F. Perigal, of the Admiralty, has prepared a by Charles I. The relative strength of the Navy at new copy of his useful Chart of Naval History, which the principal periods of our history may, therefore, shows the naval strength of the country as it stood at be readily compared by means of it. Such a compi- the commencement of the present year.—Times, July lation as the present will be very useful.-Mechanics' 28, 1860. Magazine, July 8, 1859.

PUBLISHED BY
J. D. POTTER, 31, POULTRY, AND 11, KING STREET, TOWER HILL,

(Agent for the Admiralty Charts).

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THE YEAR 1800,

OR

THE SAYINGS AND DOINGS OF OUR FATHERS AND MOTHERS

60 YEARS AGO,

PREFATORY REMARKS.

This publication exhibits a variety of occurrences of general interest, as they were recorded in the newspapers and other periodicals of the last year of the eighteenth century; it will serve to illustrate the state of social life in this country at that particular period, and enable the reader to judge of the important advances which have been made in our public and domestic condition, during the intervening time.

The year selected is interesting on various accounts :-a general war existed ; Napoleon had become First Consul, and projected an invasion of England, Talleyrand being his Foreign Secretary ; Pitt, who had long been Prime Minister to George III, was making grand efforts to carry on the War with vigour; Nelson was pursuing his glorious career; many other celebrities were living ; and the course of events then being enacted, has had a powerful influence in securing for us the prosperity and happiness we now enjoy, both nationally and individually.

A comparison between the years 1800 and 1860, will remind us of the immense progress made in that brief interval, and enable us the better to appreciate the advantages which we possess in many respects over our immediate predecessors.

In 1800 the streets and houses were not lighted with gas ; steam travelling, by land or sea, was unknown; the electric telegraph was undreamt of; the laws were harsh ; commerce restricted ; the slave trade flourished; the press-gang was in active operation ; the pillory in frequent use ; footpads and mounted highwaymen numerous ; duelling and drunkenness fashionable ; the old stage coaches slow and unsafe travelling ; and the old watchmen an inefficient protection to life and property. Since then Parliament has been reformed; free-trade established ; religious and political liberty greatly extended ; and a thousand improvements and discoveries in the arts and sciences introduced.

The “news communicated at that time was scanty and long after date, and the newspapers were of a very limited character ; “The Times” (even then the leading paper) consisted of but 16 columns, of nearly 3 inches wide, and about 18 inches long, printed on very inferior paper; and it was by no means such a formidable business, as it now is, to wade through the quantity of matter it contained ; its price was 6d. The staple subjects of all the papers were, Napoleon and the prevailing fashions, both of which were the daily themes of severe criticism ; there were no well-written essays as “ leaders,” nor instructive dissertations on the money market and city affairs.

The articles here collected together have been selected from upwards of one thousand papers, issued during 1800, and it is hoped that the reader will derive both information and amusement from their perusal.

It was intended to have added to the collection a series of notes as a running commentary to its principal paragraphs, but the subjects comprised in them were found to be too multifarious to admit of this being done without too greatly extending the limits of the work.

Should this publication meet with an extensive amount of public support, it is contemplated to issue a similar collection of articles from the periodicals and pamphlets, of other periods, so as to exhibit the manners and habits of the people of this kingdom at intervals sufficiently separated to secure a distinctive character to each epoch selected for such delineation.

F. PERIGAT

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I. B

ATRIMONY-A Gentleman of a small fortune, MA

and have been brought up very gentely, and

of a good character, and of a respectable family, and THE Arhat he was. CHE Answer of a Letter to an Officer of Hereford about 30, and bave been brought up in the country,

and never been in any trade whatever, and very

agreeable company, his fortune being but small, 'HE Expenses attending the Ring are at present taken this mode of soine lady that has got a good ten guineas.

fortune in her own hands, to the amount of 4 or

5,0001. or more, that wish for domestick happiness, W. a :

for if he will send a line of address, directed Sunday and Satterday excepted for an interview, but for R. C., to be left at the Penny Post-office, Wood- | letters post paid taken in. Direct for C. D., No. 5, street, Cheapside, till called for.

Barron Street, Panton Vile, Islinton. — (The fore

going is verbatim. --Ed.)

, Whoever wallprise information of him loa Mr. Bad

: Fonder the agere marriagerila b0%. above that field, No. 2, Blossom's Inn-gateway, Laurence-lane, age, and who will convince me of her esteem, with Cheapside, so that he may be restored to his friends, her own handwriting in answer to this, and glory will be handsomely rewarded. Had on when he in her public and sacred affection, I, Sir J. went away a blue coat, pink striped waistcoat, and D.., Baronet, will settle eleven thousand pounds brown great coat.

Provided he will return to his friends immediately, he will be received, and every- with her; and will ever study to increase her happi

a year upon her, and other estates she may bring thing amicably adjusted.

ness, and indulge her ladyship to the highest degree IN

in my power, for her making the kindest and quickest NTERESTING intelligence. - To who it may con: steps to matrimony; and I will get her one thousand

cern. If F. Cozani will give himself the trouble pounds a year more by my well known practice of to call on Mr. Woodhouse, No. 10, Little Brook: physick, that appears in one of my Bills in the Court street, he will hear of something that most likely of Equity. I shall impatiently wait to see your

signal will afford him much pleasure.

with your second finger on your left hand; with it

make a snug scratcb between your eyes, before you IF F the person who left his home on Saturday, the

15th'instant, between one and two o'clock in pass by me, on the terrace, or elsewhere, to denote the afternoon, will return, he will be received with your, or, a lady's intention, to meet me in the alcove paternal kindness and affection, and all that has strikes one; where you inay find me every dry day. If

near my house in Windsor Castle, when the clock passed be forgotten. With a man of good sense and disposition this advertisement, doubtless, will you are alone, I shall hope to see you instantly move

towards the alcove. I shall introduce the subject by prevail.

asking you if you can tell me how the ladies approve ANTED to purchase, a place in a public office, offer that Sir J W

of the enterprizing and remarkable printed marriage

D has made them, with either under Government or otherwise, on a

dictations so nice, for the use of their favourable permanent establishment, where attendance is not required after 4 o'clock : the salary not less than 2001.

, pens, and limitations that they cannot be im

peached. or from that to 2501., and if with a prospect of future

N.B.-Pray let me tell your attorney (my sweetest preferment would be liked the better. Apply per comforter) about another noble estate in Herefordsonally or by letter, to I. D., at Mr. Houseman's, No. shire that must be yours for ever, if I die first, and 31, Threadneedle-street.

that the unintended joint act of me and my brother, THE THE young man, who left his employer's

count- has made me only a tenant for life in this estate we ing-house in the city, on Wednesday last, is not be obtained. This joint act was inadvertently

so intailed, as his joint act (after his death) could most earnestly entreated to return immediately. If he does not appear by Saturday, the 26th insti

, his inserted by our attorney, when we mortgaged this

estate to A * S * *, Esq., in Brook Street, name and all particulars will be advertised, and a reward offered for his apprehension.

Grosvenor Square, for two thousand pounds. F the person does not return immediately, who FOR

TOR a Wife.—Qualified Ladies, justice obliges me IF

to give you a fortnight's notice, that I have a Oakley-street, St. George's-fields, on Sunday evening letter lately from London, that tells me His Majesty's last, and was brought home in a coach to his situation knights here are shortly to have £600 a year added by two strangers, and the next day absconded from to your income, and that I have candid accounts in his employ, a prosecution will be issued against him, prints, as large as a newspaper, to read to you for and certain means used for his discovery.

your perfect satisfaction! Come two together, and

see me at church in my new grand physical feather'd A the undersigned, w..D.. CAUTION.—Whereas Elizabeth, the wife of me, / wig: I may modestly say, report declares I am

of Farley-hill, in captivating. See further in this paper of the 20th of the parish of Swallowfield, in the county of Berks, October last. shopkeeper, has lately eloped from me without any Windsor Castle.

J D just or reasonable cause, and I having great reason to suspect she has been seduced from me by comerciat

. To gentleman in the city appointed to meet at the designed person or persons, having wantonly threatened that she intends to contract debts in order to ruin west end of the town on Sunday morning last, will me, I do hereby caution all persons from entrusting send a line to him, mentioning where she may be the said Elizabeth, my wife, as I shall not pay any seen or heard of, it will be very thankfully received. debts she may contract.-Witness my hand this 3rd Address, by post, to J. W. H., to be left at the Bank. day of April, 1800.

W D Honour may be depended on.

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