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APPENDIX CC.

Extracted from M'Culloch's Geographical Dictionary, in reference to the

Distribution of Property in Fee in the several Counties of England and Wales.

Bedford ............... Some large estates—but property notwithstanding a

good deal subdivided. Berkshire ............ Property much subdivided-a third of county occu

pied by proprietors. Bucks .................. There are some large estates. Cambridge ............ Estates of all sizes—some large—but many small

some being worth only £20, £50, to £100 per

annum-size of farms equally various. Cheshire ............... Estates for the most part large-farms mostly small. Cornwall...............Property much divided, and “vexatiously inter

mixed”_farms for the most part small. Cumberland ......... Property much divided—a few large estates—but by

far the largest portion of the county in small pro.

perties, worth £10, £20, or £200 per annum. Derby ................ (Not stated). Devon ................ .Property much divided. Dorset .............. Property in large estates – farms mostly large. Durham ............... Much property belongs to the church_also some

large estates-but property is notwithstanding a

good deal subdivided. Essex ................. .. Estates of all sizes, from £5 to £20,000 per annum.

Moderate sized farms, occupied by their owners. Gloucester ............. Estates and farms of all sizes. Hampshire........... Estates mostly large-farms of all sizes. Hereford ............... Property very variously divided a few large estates

-many medium, and some small. Hertford .............. Few large estates-farms not generally large. Huntingdon .......... Estates generally extensive.

Kent ............ Property much divided – no great estates. Yeo

manry of Kent a very superior class, and some, besides their own, occupy extensive hired farms. Land in Kent held by the tenure of gavel. kind, descending, in the event of the father dying intestate, not to the eldest son, but to all the sons

alike in equal portions. Lancaster ............ Some large estates, but property a good deal sub

divided. Leicester ...............Property mostly in large estates. Lincoln ............... Property very variously divided - estates from

£25,000 a year to £5; but the great majority

small. Middlesex ............ Property is very much divided. Monmouth ............ Some large estates, but property a good deal divided. Norfolk ............... Estates of all sizes, from £40,000 a-year downwards. Northampton......... Estates generally large-few large farms. Northumberland ... Estates of all sizes, but mostly large. Nottingham ........... Estates of all sizes--many small. Oxford ...............But few large estates—farms generally small. Rutland ............... Estates and farms of various sizes. Salop .................. Property variously divided—some estates very large

-while many are of very inferior degrees of size. Somerset............... Property variously divided-some large estates, a

good deal of land occupied by yeomen-farmers. Stafford ............... Estates varying from £10,000 a year down to £2. Suffolk ................ Property much divided—a good deal in the hands of

respectable yeomen who farm their own estates. Surrey ...............No very large estates-farms of all sizes. Sussex...... ............ Property much divided. Warwick ............ Some estates very large-others small. Westmoreland ........ Similar to Cumberland. Wiltshire ........... Some large estates—but property much subdivided. Worcester ............ Estates of all sizes-farms mostly small. York ..................Property in the West and North Ridings very much

sub-divided. In the East Riding less subdivided than in most parts of England—many families in this riding have held their estates for centuries.

APPENDIX DD.

A Comparative Statement of the Exports by steam vessels, of Horned

Cattle, Pigs, and Eggs, from the Ports of Dublin, Cork, and Waterford, in the first Ten Months of the years 1846 and 1847.

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* It may be interesting to state, that the shipments of eggs to London are generally in boxes, containing about 2,500 eggs ; and those to Liverpool in crates, containing from 6,000 to 8,000 eggs.

THE END.

WORKS ON IRELAND

PUBLISHED BY

HODGES AND SMITH,

BOOKSELLERS TO THE UNIVERSITY,

104, GRAFTON-STREET, DUBLIN.

LONDON: LONGMAN AND CO., AND SIMPKIN, MARSHALL, AND CO.

The Annals of the Four Masters, from A.D. 1172,

to the Conclusion, in 1616; consisting of the Irish Text, from the original MS. in the Royal Irish Academy, and an English Translation, with copious Explanatory Notes. By John O'Donovan, Esq., M. R. I. A. 3 vols., 4to., pp. 2498. Price £8 8s.

thaterroa

acquain be write

There are few countries in which events of greater interest for the historian have taken place, or in which matters of greater curiosity for the man of general learning have left their traces, than in Ireland. Long after the other Celtic nations had adopted new forms of Roman and feudal civilization, Ireland retained the peculiar institutions and manners of the primitive European family: and, rude and imperfect as these unquestionably were, in comparison with those of the neighbouring nations, they must be admitted to have exercised a material influence on the progrees of events in some of the most stirring periode of modern history. Nevertheless, it still remains a singular but just reproach to the learned in these countries, that the history of Ireland is yet to be written." Until lately, Irish scholars, Acquainted with the places of deposit, and competent to the translation of the native annals, have been careless of consulting, or unable to obtain access to, official records; while those to whom the sources of official information have heen open, either disregarded the aid, or were ignorant of the existence, of the other class of authorities. Hence, the reader of our principal Irish histories finds, on the one hand, a purely English version of events, as in Hollingshed or Cox; or, on the other, an equally partial Irish story, as in O'Sullivan or Keating. In fact, until the very recent exertions of the Irish Archæological Society, it might fairly have been said, that, since the publication of Sir Richard Cox's Hibernia Anglicana, there had been no addition made to the materials of medieval Irish history, with

the single exception of the splendid collection of Irish annaly translated into Latin by Dr. Charleg O'Conor, and given to the world, by the munificence of the late Duke of Buckingham, under the title of Rerum Hibernicarum Scriptores Veteres.

Of the Rerum Hibernicarum Scriptorce, the most voluminous and most interesting part is that of the FOUR MASTERS, of which it is now proposed to publish the continuation, with an English translation and notes. The early portion of these Annals, as of all the others, is, as has been observed, brief, and even meagre in its notices, and valuable chiefly for the settlement of ancient topography and family history; but from the twelfth and thirteenth centuries onward, the narrative is copious and graphic, and abounds with varied incident and characteristic details. This hitherto unpublished portion, extending from A. D. 1172 to A. D. 1616, and of which the original authorities are now, in great part, lost, comprises more than three-fourths of the entire compilation ; so that the proposed publication may be regarded as virtually giving these Annals to the world for the first time.

Considerable expense and trouble have been incurred in selecting models for the Irish Type, from the best written and most valuable of the early Irish Manuscripts. The Publishers are happy to say, that their selection has met with the full approbation of all persons capable of forming a judgment on the subject; and has been adopted by the Royal Irish Academy, and the Irish Archæological Society.

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