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St. George's Hall, is one hundred and eight feet long; and the whole north side is taken up with the Triumph of Edward the Black Prince. At the upper part of the ball is Edward III. the founder of the order, seated on a throne, receiving the kings of France and Scotland prisoners: the Black Prince is seated in the middle of the procession, crowned with laurel, and carried by slaves, preceded by captives; he is attended by the emblems of Victory, Liberty, and other insignia, with the banners of France and Scotland displayed. The painter has indulged his fancy, by closing the procession with the fiction of the countess of Salisbury, in the person of a fine lady making garlands for the prince, and the representation of the Merry Wives of Windsor. In this last, he has humourously introduced himself in a black hood and scarlet cloak.

At the lower end of the hall is a noble music gallery, supported by slaves larger than the life, in proper attitudes, said to represent a father and his three sons, taken prisoners by the Black Primce. Over the gallery, on the Jower compartment of the cieling, is the collar of the order of the Garter fully displayed. The painting of this room was by Verrio, in which, as well as in other parts of the palace, he has exhibited the prominence of his absurd stile. ·

St. George's, or The King's CHAPEL. On the cieling is represented the Ascension; and the altar-piece is adorned with a painting of The Last Supper. On the north side of the chapel The Resurrection of Lazarus, and other miracles, by Verrio; and in a group of spectators, the painter has introduced his own effigy, with those of SiR Godfrey KNELLER, and Cooper, who assisted him in these paintings. The east end of the chapel is taken up with the closets belonging to bis majesty and the royal family. The carved work is done by Gibbons, in lime-tree wood.

From this chapel visitors are conducted to the QUEEN'S GUARD CHAMBER, the first room entered, but the last of the state apartuients shewn to the public, the others being only opened when the court reside at Windsor. They con

sist

sist of many beautiful chambers adorned with paintings by the most eminent masters.

The INNER OR FORN Court, is so called from a pair of stags horns of a very extraordinary size, taken in the forest, and set up in that court, which is painted in bronze and stone colour. On one side is represented a Roman battle, and on the opposite side a sea fight, with the images of Jupiter, Neptune, Mercury, and Pallas; and in the gallery is a representation of David playing before the ark.

St. George's COLLEGIATE CHAPEL, is situated in the middle of the lower court of the Castle, and must not be confounded with ST. GEORGE's, or the King's CHAPEL, in the Castle. It is a beautiful structure, in the purest style of Gothic architecture; and was first erected by Edward III. in 1377, for the honour of the Order of the Garter. But however noble the first design, Edward IV. not finding it entirely completed, designed and undertook the present structure. The work was carried on by Henry VII. who finished the body of the chapel; and Sir Reginald Bray, K.G. assisted in ornamenting the chapel and completing the roof. The architecture of the inside has ever been esteemed for its great beauty ; the stone roof in particular is reckoned an excellent piece of workmanship. It is an ellipsis supported by Gothic pillars, whose ribs and groins sustain the whole roof, every part of which has some different device. On each side of the choir, are the stalls of the sovereign and knights of the Garter, with the helmet, mantling, crest, and sword of each knight, set up over his stall, on a canopy of antient carving curiously wrought. Over the canopy is affixed the banner of each knight blazoned on silk, and on the back of the stalls are the titles of the knights, with their arms neatly engraved and blazoned on copper. The sovereign's stall, on the right hand of the entrance into the choir, is distinguished by rich ornaments. The prince's stall is on the left, and has no distinction from those of the rest of the knights; the whole society, according to the statutes of the institution, being companions, equal in honour and power.

In

In a rault under the choir are interred Henry VIII. and his third queen Jane Seymour, Charles I. and a daughter of queen Anne. Under the south aisle, near the door of the choir, rest the remains of Henry VI.; Edward IV. is interred in the north aisle *. The tomb of this king is fronted with touchstone; over it is a beautiful monument of steel, said to have been the work of Quintin Matsys.

There are several chapels in this fabric, in which are the monuments of many illustrious persons; particularly, of Edward earl of Lincoln, a renowned naval warrior; George Manners lord Roos, and Anne, his consort, niece of Edward IV.; Anne, duchess of Exeter, her mother and sister; Sir Reginald Bray; the famous lord Hastings, beheaded by Richard III.; and Charles Brandon, duke of Suffolk, who married the sister of king Henry VIII.

MODERN MONUMENTS. Dr. Theodore Aylward, Gresham professor of Music, died 1801. Nathaniel Giles, Mus.D. 1633. William Child, Mus. D. sixty-five years organist at Windsor and Whitehall, 1697. Dr. Samuel Prat, dean of Windsor, 1723. Hon. Frederick Keppel, bishop of Exeter, 1778. John Buller, Esq. one of the lords of the treasury, 1786 ; and several others.

This chapel was repaired and beautified in 1790. The altar consists of curious and delicate workmanship, in va. rious carved devices, surrounding West's picture of the Last Supper. Over this altar is a noble painted window; the subject the Resurrection, divided into three compart. ments. In the centre is Our Saviour ascending from the

* In 1789, the workmen employed in repairing the church, discos vered the vault of king Edward. The body, inclosed in a leaden and wooden coffin, measuring six feet three inches in length, appeared reduced to a skeleton. The bottom of the coffin was covered with a muddy liquor, about three inches deep, of a strong and saline taste. Near this was a wooden coffin, supposed to have contained the body of his queen, who died three years after the king, in confinement, at Bermondsey Abbey, and is supposed to have been secretly interred. On the sides of this vault were inscribed, in characters resembling those of the times, “ Edward IV:” with some names, probably those of the workmen employed at the funeral.

sepulchre,

sepulchre, preceded by the angel, above whom, in the clouds, are cherubims and seraphims; and among these is a portrait of prince Octavius, eighth son of George III. and his consort. In the front ground are the Roman sol. diers, thrown into various postures with terror and astonishment. In the right hand compartment are represented Mary Magdalen, Mary the mother of James, and Salome, approaching the sepulchre, with unguents and spices, in order to anoint the body. In the left hand division are Peter and John, who are supposed to have been informed by Mary Magdalen, that the body of Christ was missing, and are running with the greatest anxiety, astonishment, and speed, toward the sepulchre. This masterly performance was designed by Mr. West in 1785, and executed by Mr. Jarvis, assisted by Mr. Forest, between that period and 1788. This window cost 40001. In the windows on each side are painted the arms of the sovereign and knights who subscribed toward the above sum.

Several of the windows in this beautiful fabric are finely stained, and consist of various scripture subjects.

The organ, of Gothic exterior construction, built by Green, is a noble production of genius. It is supposed to be superior to any in the kingdom, particularly in the swell. The organ case was built by Mr. Emlyn. The carved work to this erection is very curious and costly. The ascent to the choir, from the west door, is by, a flight of steps, under an arcade of artificial stone, extending the whole width of the choir.

The improvements in the choir are general, and particularly the stalls of the knights of the Garter, which have received great embellishments; the most conspicuous of which is the king's stall. It was erected in 1789, under the direction of Mr. Emlyn, and is carved in a neat Gothic style. In the centre are the arms of the sovereign, encircled with laurel, and crowned with the royal diadem; the whole surrounded with fleurs-de-luce, and the star of the order, with G. R. III. properly disposed. The curtains and cushions are of blue velvet fringed with gold. The old VOL.V. No. 119.

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banners

In a vault under the choir are interred Henry VIII. and his third queen Jane Seymour, Charles I. and a daughter of queen Anne. Under the south aisle, near the door of the choir, rest the remains of Henry VI.; Edward IV. is interred in the north aisle*. The tomb of this king is fronted with touchstone; over it is a beautiful monument of steel, said to have been the work of Quintin Matsys.

There are several chapels in this fabric, in which are the monuments of many illustrious persons; particularly, of Edward earl of Lincoln, a renowned naval warrior; George Manners lord Roos, and Anne, his consort, niece of Edward IV.; Anne, duchess of Exeter, her mother and sister; Sir Reginald Bray; the famous lord Hastings, beheaded by Richard III.; and Charles Brandon, duke of Suffolk, who married the sister of king Henry VIII.

MODERN MONUMENTS. Dr. Theodore Aylward, Gresham professor of Music, died 1801. Nathaniel Giles, Mus.D. 1633. William Child, Mus. D. sixty-five years organist at Windsor and Whitehall, 1697. Dr. Samuel Prat, dean of Windsor, 1723. Hon. Frederick Keppel, bishop of Exeter, 1778. John Buller, Esq. one of the lords of the treasury, 1786; and several others.

This chapel was repaired and beautified in 1790. The altar consists of curious and delicate workmanship, in various carved devices, surrounding West's picture of the Last Supper. Over this altar is a noble painted window; the subject the Resurrection, divided into three compartments. In the centre is Our Saviour ascending from the

* In 1789, the workmen employed in repairing the church, discovered the vault of king Edward. The body, inclosed in a leaden and Wooden coffin, measuring six feet three inches in length, appeared reduced to a skeleton. The bottom of the cofiia was covered with a muddy liquor, about three inches deep, of a strong and saline taste. Near this was a wooden coffin, supposed to have contained the body of his queen, who died three years after the king, in confinement, at Bermondsey Abbey, and is supposed to have been secretly interred. On the sides of this vault were inscribed, in characters resembling those of the times, “ Edward IV:” with some names, probably those of the workmen employed at the funeral.

sepulchre,

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