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ment of rural scenery the didactic poet paid this merited eulogy, while he was living to enjoy it:

Him too, the living leader of thy powers,
Great Nature! him the Muse shall hail in notes
Which antedate the praise true Genius claims
From just posterity. Bards yet unborn
Shall pay to Brown that tribute, fitliest paid
In strains the beauty of his scenes inspire.

Masox. Instearl of trim formality, irregular groups of trees adorning beautiful swelling lawns, interspersed with slirubberies, broken clumps, and solemn woods; through the recesses of which are walks, that lead to various parts of these delightful gardens. The banks, along the margin of the Thames, are judiciously varied, forming a noble terrace, which extends the whole length of the gardens; in the south-east quarter of which a road leads to a sequestered spot, in which is a cottage, that cxbibits the most elegant simplicity. These gardens are open to the public, every Sunday, from Midsummer till toward the end of autumn.

At the font of Richmond Hill, on the Thames, is the duke of Buccleugh's villa. From the lawn a subterra. neous communication with the pleasure grounds on the opposite side of the road, extends almost to the summit of the bill. Near this is the charming residence of the Jate lady Diana Beauclerk, who berself decorated one of the rooms with lilacs and other flowers, in the same manner as at her former residence at Twickenham.

On Richmond Green is a house belonging to viscount Fitzwilliam, whose maternal grandfather, Sir Matthew Decker, bart. an eminent Duteb merchant, built a room here for the reception of George I. In this bouse is an antient painting of Richmond Palace, by Vinkeboom; another, said to be the work of one of Reuben's scholars, is supposed to represent the lodge in the Old Park, before it was pulled down by the duke of Ormond. Richmond Green is surrounded by lofty elms, and, at one corner of it, is

a theatre,

perty of the duke of Queensberry, who transferred hither the pictures and furniture from his sent a: Amesbury, in Wiltshire. The tapestry, which hung behind the curl of Clarendon in the court of Chancery, now decorates the hall of this house.

“ There was formerly a park adjoining Richmond Green, called the Old or Little Park, to distinguish it from the extensive one, made by Charles I. and called the New Park. In this Old Park was a lodge, the lease of which was granted, in 1707, for ninety-nine years, to James duke of Ormond, who rebuilt the house, and resided there till his impeachment in 1715, when he retired to Paris. Soon after George II. then prince of Wales, purchased the re. mainder of the lease, which, after the duke's impeachment, was vested in the earl of Arran, and made the lodge his residence. It was pulled down about the year 1772, at which time his present majesty, who had resided in it, had an intention of building a new palace on the site. The foundations were actually laid; and, in the public dining room at Hampton Court, is the model of the intended palace. Not far from the site of the lodge stands the Obserfatory, built by Sir William Chambers, in 1769. Among a very fine set of instruments are particularly to be no. ticed, a mural arch of a hundred and forty degrees, and cight feet radius; a zenith sector of twelve feet; a transit instrument of eight fcet; and a ten-fect reflector by leru. chel. On the top of the building is a movrable donne, which contains an equatorial instrument. The obowe Vila tory contains also a collection of subjects in natural ha tory, well preserved; an excellent apparatue fuit folokercesphical experiments, some modeh, and a chietion of twee from his majesty's mines in the forest of Barth, ini (imp many. A part of the Old Påsk i mwa dairyol grubong farm in bis majesty's own harris, 'Thora pemandu stitutes the royal gardens, which were laid out by Berlynas man in arenues, and afterward improved and a topood to their present form boy Lancelot Pt v*), the Justpions dit ciple of Kent, to who exquisite tante in the embalut

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ment of rural scenery the didaetic poet paid this merited eulogy, while he was living to enjoy it:

IIim too, the living leader of thy powers,
Great Nature! him the Muse shall hail in potes
Which antedate the praise true Genius claims
From just posterity. Bards yet unborn
Shall pay to Brown that tribute, fitliest paid
In strains the beauty of his scenes inspire.

Masox. Instead of trim formality, irregular groups of trees adorning beautiful swelling lawns, interspersed with sl subberies, broken clumps, and solemn woods; through the recesses of which are walks, that lead to various parts of these delightful gardens. The banks, along the margin of the Thames, are judiciously varied, forming a noble terrace, which extends the whole length of the gardens; in the south-east quarter of which a road leads to a sequestered spot, in which is a cottage, that exhibits the most elegant simplicity. These gardens are open to the public, every Sunday, from Midsummer till toward the end of autumn,

At the font of Richmond Hill, on the Thames, is the duke of Buccleugh's villa. From the lawn a subterra. neous communication with the pleasure grounds on the opposite side of the road, extends almost to the summit of the hill. Near this is the charming residence of the Jate lady Diana Beauclerk, who berself decorated one of the rooms with lilacs and other flowers, in the same manner as at ber former residence at Twickenham.

On Richmond Green is a house belonging to viscount Fitzwilliam, whose maternal grandfather, Sir Matthew Decker, bart. an eminent "Dutch merchant, built a room here for the reception of George I. In this bouse is an antient painting of Richmond Palace, by Vinkeboom; another, said to be the work of one of Reuben's scholars, is supposed to represent the lodge in the Old Park, before it was pulled down by the duke of Ormond. Richmond Green is surrounded by lofty elms, and, at one corner of it, is

a theatre,

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