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NOTICE.

Education is a subject of very great importance to-day.

Papers on the great Catholic leaders and on present methods will be contributed to the Catholic World by EDWARD A. PACE, Ph.D., Professor of Psychology, Catholic University, Washington, D. C.

The Bible. The Holy Father has urged us to study the

Sacred Scriptures. J. F. FENLON, D.D., Head of the Sulpician House, St. Austin's College, Washington, D. C., will contribute to the Catholic World a number of papers on the Catholic version.

PhilosophyHaeckel is much talked of to-day. Would

you know the meaning and value of his philosophy ?-read the papers in the Catholic World by FRANCIS P. DUFFY, D.D., Professor of Philosophy, Dunwoodie Seminary, Editor New York Review. Nietzsche is widely discussed. M. D. PETRE, author of Where Saints Have Trod, etc., explains his theories and his aims in the Catholic World.

The Mission Work of the Catholic Church

throughout the World. ABBE KLEIN, whose Land of the Strenuous Life has been crowned by the French Academy, and other well-informed writers will tell of that work in the pages of the Catholic World.

Japan, Norway, Austria-Hungary, Italy, France,

and Russia are contributing in a wonderful way to day to the making of the world's history—both secular and religious; how they are doing so will be treated in papers by J. C. MONAGHAN, of U. S. Consular Bureau; MAX TURMANN, of La Quinzaine ; RENE HENRY, of Le Correspondant, and other distinguished writers in the lic World.

During the coming year the Catholic World will pu contributions by

VERY REV. GEORGE M. SEARLE, C.S.P.
JAMES J. FOX, DD. ETHELRED L. TAUNTON
WILLIAM BARRY, DD. G. TYRRELL, SJ.
JOSEPH MCSORLEY, C.S.P. WILLIAM L SULLIVAN, C.S

Hon. Mrs. M. M. MAXWELL SCOTT.
LOUISE IMOGEN GUINEY. AGNES REPPLIER.
M. F. QUINLAN.

JEANIE DRAKE

A Serial Story:
“ HER LADYSHIP,”.

By KATHARINE TYNAN,
Author of " Julia,” etc., is now running in

THE CATHOLIC WORLD.

A monthly summary and commentary on the world's events, capable reviews of the latest books, and a summary of the contents of all the more valuable foreign periodicals, appear in

The Catholic World.
PUBLISHED BY THE PAULIST FATHERS.

Subscription, $3 per Year.
Address, 120-122 West 60th Street,

NEW YORK CITY.

COMMENTS OF THE PRESS:
A credit to American Catholic literature.--Pittsburg Catholic.
THE CATHOLIC WORLD makes a fine record.---Iowa Catholic Messenger:
The literary standard of THE CATHOLIC WORLD is exceptionally high.-Lowell Courier.

It is able, courteous, and interesting, and presents the Catholic faith in its most attractive aspect.-New York Sun.

The thoughtful, intelligent man, Catholic or non-Catholic, will derive much pleasure and profit by reading it.--Daily News.

THE CATHOLIC WORLD is, as usual, weighted with matter of varied and vital interest. Its subjects are, as a rule, selected with remarkable judiciousness and freshness, and their discussion is always distinguished for fine philosophical spirit and intellectual vigor.-Detroit Free Press.

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THE OFFICE OF THE CATHOLIC WORLD, NEW YORK.

120-122 West 60th Street.
ART AND BOOK COMPANY, 22 Paternoster Row, London, E. G.

Peer ORUCE A SECOND CLASA MA

THE COLUMBIAN READING UNION.

M ANY even among the intelligent and instructed, imagine that they can in

M dulge with impunity in the indiscriminate reading of all kinds of litera. ture, but it is a grave mistake, says Cardinal Logue, Archbishop of Armagh, in his recent pastoral. Slowly perhaps, and insensibly, but not less certainly, will an injurious effect be produced. The body is not more certainly affected by the food upon which it has been nourished than the mind by the thoughts to which it has long been habituated. But if injurious effects may be produced on minds that are mature and judgments that have been regulated by experience, how much more certainly will they be produced on the impressionable, unsuspecting, inexperienced minds of youth. Here arises the very grave obligation by which the heads of families are bound to exercise care, vigilance, and judgment in excluding from their homes all literature which might be injurious to those under their care. Suspicion in this matter is laudable; over-confidence may be ruinous.

Nor is it enough to guard youth against doubtful or injurious literature. They should be supplied with sound, solid, wholesome reading-reading which will furnish both instruction and amusement without prejudice to either inno.cence or edification.

We take the following passage from the notable pastoral letter by Bishop McFaul, of Trenton, N. J., and at the same time strongly commend the pamphlet to our readers. It is published by Benziger Brothers, New York, and only costs ten cents; yet it is a whole volume of good, practical, Catholic reading:

What shall we say of the efficacy of good books upon family life and thought! When we speak of books we do not mean to restrict them to religious and devotional works. No; we include all healthy literature. In our day everybody reads. Periodicals, pamphlets, and newspapers are the literature of the millions. It is the daily newspaper, however, that enjoys the largest patronage. We must have the news warm, at our breakfast table every morning. No doubt, a newspaper is a potent factor for good or for evil; and America publishes some excellent secular newspapers, which may safely be introduced into the family. Our religious weeklies are performing a very beneficial work, and should receive a more generous support. Every Catholic family should subscribe for a Catholic newspaper and a Catholic magazine, possess a small library of religicus books, and such other works as will instruct and interest.

But, what about those purveyors of uncleanness, the vulgar sheets reeking with narratives so largely read by all classes ? Reprove them for their vileness, and the reply is :. “We print the news.Yes, they do, and such news; and such advertisements! Let us recall the words of the Apostle of the Gentiles: “But all uncleanness... let it not so much as be named among you, as becometh saints; or obscenity, or foolish talking, or scurrility, which is to no purpose" (Eph. V. 3, 4).

Every one will admit that some of our newspapers are a disgrace. It is shocking to witness the harm which these disreputable journals do by pandering to the lower passions of the multitude. They educate in crime, destroy purity; in a word, sow immorality. They are so many foul demons entering the family for its defilement and ruin. Perhaps the most terrible indictment that can be brought against America is that the public demand for the filth supplied by the “yellow journals" is so great as to render rich and prosperous the unscrupulous editors, writers, and publishers who cater to debased appetites.

We desire to employ all the power of our holy office to stem this flood of corruption, and we, therefore, most earnestly beseech parents to banish all such newspapers and books from their firesides. O fathers and mothers, never permit them to contaminate your homes !

The people of Vienna are going to give wholesome literature its chance. According to the Academy, that city has of late been terribly afflicted with cheap sensational printed matter, with the result that suicide is increasingly frequent and Hooliganism stalks abroad. Whereupon the Viennese have established a society for the encouragement of decent literature through the offering of substantial prizes for healthy novels. The idea is not simply to give authors an incentive, but to make a special appeal to the public. The prize-winning novels will be put on the market at so cheap a price that the unhealthy authors will be unable to compete, but will be compelled, like the rivals of the Standard Oil combination, to shut up shop. The Academy hopes for the best, but there is much to justify the surmise that the public which buys sensational fiction buys it because it prefers it, and not from any abstract desire to lay out money to the best advantage. The consumption of good or bad literature can never be arbitrarily fixed. The gradual education of the public is all that we can rely upon to work improvement in the matter, and this process is not only slow, but, at the best, is bound to leave a large area of ignorance, especially among those who, by the agency of secular education, are deprived of the Christian ideals upon which civilization is founded.

Professor W. F.P. Stockley, M.A., prepared a very suggestive outline for a study of the religious belief of Shakespeare by request of the management of the Champlain Summer-School. Some of our Reading Circles may profit by the following synopsis and bibliography:

THE RELIGIOUS SPIRIT OF SHAKESPEARE.—The subject of Shakespeare's Plays, and their Consequent Limitations.- What is Assumed, in Religion and in Morals, if not Expressed.—The Variety of Life, the Humor of Life, the Facts, and the Difficulties. —The Triumphs of Evil.—The Absolute Good. -No Bar in the Plays to Further Knowledge by Revelation.—The Scepticism of Hamlet and of Lear.-The Supernatural and the Fancies of the Midsummer Night's Dream and the Tempest.

SHAKESPEARE AND THE CHURCH.—The Age of Elizabeth, and the First Generation under the New Religion.—The Advantage of Catholic Insight in Feeling with and Understanding these Circumstances.—Shakespeare's Treatment of Anti-Catholic Passages in Older Plays.—The Spirit of Shakespeare's

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