Зображення сторінки
PDF
ePub

predecessors. The German Constitution gives to the Emperor very ample powers, the bare enumeration of which would occupy too much of our space, and the Emperor is, like most other officials, not unwilling to enlarge those powers and to violate the spirit and often the letter of the Constitution in order to have his own way. In order to understand his foreign policy, it must be borne in mind that Germany is, as it were, in a vice between France and Russia. To escape from this situation the Triple Alliance was formed. Further efforts for the same object were made by the endeavor to raise up for France other enemies. Jules Ferry was encouraged to annex Tunis. Russian schemes in Central Asia were encouraged in order that the possible enemy on the other side might become involved with Great Britain. The recent defeat of Russia in its conflict with Japan has formed a deliverance earnestly desired, indeed, but not, we believe, directly promoted by the Kaiser. One arm of the “vice” has been destroyed. But through the entente which has been brought about between France and England a new danger to German predominance had arisen. This the Emperor endeavored to render abortive by his proceedings in Morocco. His object was to detach France, to isolate her; even, some say, to render Paris dependent upon Berlin. Distrust and suspicion of England were insinuated by German agents. England, it was said, was using France as a cat's paw to work her will upon Germany. That England is the enemy of Germany seems now to be taken for granted throughout Europe. The question for France was to which side should she attach herself. There was a period of hesitation; nor can it be said with perfect confidence that that period is over. But signs are not wanting that the decision has been made. Nay, it may be shrewdly surmised that the entente cordiale will harden into a definite alliance between France and England, to which the Emperor's opposition will have distinctly contributed. The fêtes at Brest on the occasion of the visit of the British fleet bore evidence of the most hearty good will on the part of the French people and of the French government. The interests alike of France and England point in the same direction. England has it in her power, by means of her fleet, to free the army of France so that it may not have any care for the defence of the coast-line; and the services of the British Fleets in

other ways would render England a valuable ally in a defensive war. Whether or no an alliance is to be formed, there cannot be any reasonable doubt about the solidity of the entente.

The affairs of France have been so closely intermixed with those of Germany that there is but little left to mention. Anxiety is beginning to be felt on account of the delay of Germany in giving particulars with reference to the Conference about Morocco. Even after the concessions which France has made, it is feared that further trouble will arise. The concessions granted to a German firm, and the rumored issue of a loan to the Sultan by German bankers, seem to indicate a wish to take advantage of the present situation in a way which would be a violation of the terms agreed upon between the various powers.

In the Hungarian dominions the Austria-Hungary. conflict between the Fejervary

Ministry and the coalition majority is being continued throughout the country. Parliament having been prorogued, we do not hear of those scenes which attract the attention of the newspaper reader. The contest has taken the form of the “passive resistance” which has been so widely resorted to in England by those who object to the Education Act. This resistance to the tax collector is defended on the ground that the Ministry has no right to govern after it has been defeated in both Houses of Parliament, even after the Crown has refused to accept its resignation. “In the present circumstance it is the duty of every one to withhold all public services from an unconstitutional government.” This is the declaration of a manifesto issued by the managing Committee of the Coalition. The Government threatens to dismiss the local officials if they refuse to perform the duty of collecting the taxes. In this event the Committee promises to compensate them on the restoration of normal conditions. It is the government and its supporters that will have to pay the penalty in the end. How soon this end will come cannot be predicted; but the decisive conflict cannot long be delayed.

[ocr errors]

predecessors. The German Constitution gives to the Emperor very ample powers, the bare enumeration of which would occupy too much of our space, and the Emperor is, like most other officials, not unwilling to enlarge those powers and to violate the spirit and often the letter of the Constitution in order to have his own way. In order to understand his foreign policy, it must be borne in mind that Germany is, as it were, in a vice between France and Russia. To escape from this situation the Triple Alliance was formed. Further efforts for the same object were made by the endeavor to raise up for France other enemies. Jules Ferry was encour. aged to annex Tunis. Russian schemes in Central Asia were encouraged in order that the possible enemy on the other side might become involved with Great Britain. The recent defeat of Russia in its conflict with Japan has formed a deliverance earnestly desired, indeed, but not, we believe, directly promoted by the Kaiser. One arm of the “vice” has been destroyed. But through the entente which has been brought about between France and England a new danger to German predominance had arisen. This the Emperor endeavored to render abortive by his proceedings in Morocco. His object was to detach France, to isolate her; even, some say, to render Paris dependent upon Berlin. Distrust and suspicion of England were insinuated by German agents. England, it was said, was using France as a cat's paw to work her will upon Germany. That England is the enemy of Germany seems now to be taken for granted throughout Europe. The question for France was to which side should she attach herself. There was a period of hesitation; nor can it be said with perfect confidence that that period is over. But signs are not wanting that the decision has been made. Nay, it may be shrewdly surmised that the entente cordiale will harden into a definite alliance between France and England, to which the Emperor's opposition will have distinctly contributed. The fêtes at Brest on the occasion of the visit of the British feet bore evidence of the most hearty good will on the part of the French people and of the French government. The interests alike of France and England point in the same direction. England has it in her power, by means of her feet, to free the army of France so that it may not have any care for the defence of the coast-line; and the services of the British Fleets in

other ways would render England a valuable ally in a defensive war. Whether or no an alliance is to be formed, there cannot be any reasonable doubt about the solidity of the entente.

The affairs of France have been so closely intermixed with those of Germany that there is but little left to mention. Anxiety is beginning to be felt on account of the delay of Germany in giving particulars with reference to the Conference about Morocco. Even after the concessions which France has made, it is feared that further trouble will arise. The concessions granted to a German firm, and the rumored issue of a loan to the Sultan by German bankers, seem to indicate a wish to take advantage of the present situation in a way which would be a violation of the terms agreed upon between the various powers.

In the Hungarian dominions the Austria-Hungary. conflict between the Fejervary

Ministry and the coalition majority is being continued throughout the country. Parliament having been prorogued, we do not hear of those scenes which attract the attention of the newspaper reader. The contest has taken the form of the "passive resistance” which has been so widely resorted to in England by those who object to the Ed. ucation Act. This resistance to the tax collector is defended on the ground that the Ministry has no right to govern after it has been defeated in both Houses of Parliament, even after the Crown has refused to accept its resignation. “In the present circumstance it is the duty of every one to withhold all public services from an unconstitutional government." This is the declaration of a manifesto issued by the managing Committee of the Coalition. The Government threatens to dismiss the local officials is they refuse to perform the duty of collecting the taxes. In this event the Committee promises to compensate them on the restoration of normal conditions. It is the government and its supporters that will have to pay the penalty in the end. How soon this end will come cannot be predicted; but the decisive conflict cannot long be delayed.

[ocr errors]

Italian politicians are enjoying a Italy.

vacation, Parliament having ad

journed. We hope the study which it deserves is being given to the Encyclical addressed by the Pope to the Italian bishops. It can scarcely be doubted that it involves a new departure and that the Catholics of Italy will be called upon by their bishops to work for the wellbeing of their country, in order “to reintroduce Jesus Christ into the family, into the school, into society"; "to co-operate for the material and civil welfare of the nation.” “The Church,” the Pope declares, “in the long course of her history, has always and in every case clearly proved that she possesses a wonderful power of adaptation to the changeable conditions of human society, so that saving always the integrity and immutability of the faith and morals, and saving equally her sacred rights, she easily adapts and accommodates herself to all that is contingent and accidental to the changes of the times and to the new exigencies of society."

Spain is now under the rule of Spain.

the Liberals and looking forward

to a general election. The party in power carefully organizes these elections, as carefully as our fellow-citizens in the Southern States; nor is there any secret about it. In fact, for many years by mutual arrangement Liberals and Conservatives alternately governed the country, the one making way for the other, with the greatest equanimity and in the spirit of the most perfect fair play. This seems a truly enviable method, were it not that, as the recent war showed, bɔth also seemed to have been equally ready to neglect their real duties. The King is on the point of adding one more to the long list of royal visits. He will this time be the guest of the German Emperor.

The Committee appointed by the Sweden.

Swedish Riksdag have made their

Report as to the method to be adopted by Sweden in view of the action of the Norwegian Storthing in declaring the Dissolution of the Union. Sweden, of course, could not accept the action of Norway as final, from a legal point of view, however willing it might be to

« НазадПродовжити »