Зображення сторінки
PDF
ePub

PREFACE.

these are noticed in the concluding chapter, which contains a bric review of the whole subject.

In attempting to give a general, but-to the measure of the writer's abilitya conscientious survey of the state and prospects of the Plastic Arts in England, the subject has naturally divided itself into two parts, perfectly distinct: the one, the actual or internal state of the Arts-first, in their practice, and next, in their appreciation ; the other, the administrative or external economy of the Arts; the means of promoting the knowledge of them, as well for appreciation as for practice; and including the many public questions connected therewith, as Copyright-MuseumsAcademies- Public Works; in a word, the EDUCATION OF THE PEOPLE, so far as the Arts of Design ure capable of promoting it. It is to this latter branch of the subject that the present volume is confined.

That the writer has overcome the many difficulties connected with these topics, he dare not hope ; but he trusts he may have done something towards removing the obstructions which have hitherto stood in the way of their fair estimation. He will only add, that as this work treats but of Painting, Sculpture, and Architecture, he has retained the term Fine Arts on his title-page only in compliance with common usage Elsewhere he has most frequently employed the more precise and accurate terms of Plastic Arts and Arts of Design,

[merged small][ocr errors][ocr errors]

CHAPTER 1.

REPORT OF THE COMMONS' COMMITTEE ON ARTS AND MANU

FACTURES-PRELIMINARY REMARKS ON THE STATE OF ART AND PATRONAGE IN ENGLAND.

S

"Les Arts concourent a éclairer une nation, et à augmenter la prospérité générale, en contribuant au bonheur de chaque individu, par leur influence marquée sur la vie civile; ......... mais nulle part on n'en a fait une branche de L'EDUCATION PUBLIQUE pour adoucir par ces arts les mæurs du peuple.”—HEYNE.

“NATIONAL encouragement of the Fine Arts should in all cases be spirited,-generous,-impartial; and should not be subjected either to the caprices of power, to the varying humour of the transient depositories of the public confidence, or to the inconstant and ever mutable gusts of popular frenzy.”—DR. J. R. Scott.

“......... But the interposition of GOVERNMENT should not extend to interference; it should aim at the developement and extension of art, but it should neither control its action, nor force its cultivation.”-SELECT COMMITTEE OF THE COMMONS, 1836.

« НазадПродовжити »