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the Royal Academy, but with regret at the absence of it in their own body; they consider that the silent perseverance of fifteen years, and the having rescued numbers from poverty by their exertions, entitle them to some reward,-a reward that will come most opportunely now, as it will enable them to accomplish for the public benefit, that which is so loudly [and so justly] called for."*

Well aware that this Society has really accomplished much--especially in landscape art-I have thought it but just to give a full statement of its claims. With respect to the best mode of meeting them, much consideration will doubtless be required. It is not, however, easy to perceive that any mischief is likely to arise from a grant enabling it henceforth to be free of rent,--provided the basis of the society be somewhat extended, and its permanency secured. And whatever the differences of constitution and plan, which obtain between this society and the Royal Academy, (which ought by no means to be overlooked,) it can scarcely be denied that the favour shown to the latter institution, in its present condition, greatly strengthens the claims of the former to the liberal consideration of the crown and of parliament.

* Ib. pp. 28-31.

CHAPTER XI.

OF THE PRESENT POSITION OF THE QUESTION OF NATIONAL

EDUCATION, AS A DUTY OF THE STATE, AND OF THE
CONNEXION OF AN ENLIGHTENED PUBLIC ENCOURAGE-

MENT OF THE FINE ARTS THEREWITH.

"Were but a hundred men to combine a deep conviction that VIRTUOUS HABITS MAY BE FORMED BY THE VERY MEANS BY WHICH KNOWLEDGE 18 COMMUNICATED; that men may be made better, not only in consequence, but by the mode, and in the process, of instruction: were but a hundred men to combine that clear conviction of this, which I myself at this moment feel, even as I feel the certainty of my being, with the perseverance of a Clarkson or a Bell, the promises of ancient prophecy would disclose themselves to our faith, even as when a noble castle, hidden from us by an intervening mist, discovers itself by its reflection in the tranquil lake, on the opposite shore of which we stand gazing. What an awful duty, wbat a source of all other, the fairest virtues, does not Hope become! We are bad ourselves because we despair of the goodness of others.

IF IT BE .SAID THAT IT SHOULD BE OUR ENDEAVOUR NOT SO MUCH TO REMOVE IGNORANCE, AS TO MAKE THE IGNORANT RELIGIOUS: RELIGION HERSELF THROUGH HER SACRED ORACLES ANSWERS FOR ME THAT ALL EFFECTIVE FAITH PRESUPPOSES KNOWLEDGE AND INDIVIDUAL CONVICTION."-SAMUEL TAYLOR COLERIDGE.

“Nor let us believe with the dupes of a sballow policy that there exists upon the earth one prejudice that can be deemed salutary, or one error beneficial to perpetuate. As the petty fish which is fabled to possess the property of arresting the largest vessel to which it clings, even so may a single prejudice, unnoticed or despised, more than the adverse blast, or the dead calm, delay the bark of knowledge in the vast seas of time.”—EDWARD LYTTON BULWER,

CHAPTER XI.

OF THE PRESENT POSITION OF THE QUESTION OF NATIONAL

EDUCATION, AS A DUTY OF THE STATE, AND OF THE

CONNEXION OF AN ENLIGHTENED PUBLIC ENCOURAGE

MENT OF THE FINE ARTS THEREWITH.

That branch of the subject which we now approach surpasses in importance any that has yet occupied our attention, and is surrounded with far more serious difficulties. While inseparably connected with what has preceded, it opens up an extensive field of enquiry, of which but a small portion lies within our immediate view.

The discouragements which at present surround the artist in his humblest as well as in his loftiest efforts, spring alike from the grossly insufficient nature of that general education which prevails in England. Every generous attempt to revive historical and religious art amongst us is impeded by the absence, even in our highest educational institutions, of any adequate culture fitting the mind to appreciate those branches of plastic art. It is not a rare but a common occurrence to find Englishmen of no mean acquirements expressing opinions in relation to the arts of design, which evince a total insensibility to their highest purpose,-regarding them as little more than a graceful means of gratifying a taste for ostentatious display. And descending lower in the scale, it is equally common to find such general and utter ignorance of the elementary principles of beauty in form and colour as renders nugatory the most energetic efforts to improve design in its application to

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