Зображення сторінки
PDF
ePub
[ocr errors]

PAGE.

“ The Cake of Barley Bread ; or Emancipation of the Church of Christ from

Protestant Domination.” By William Vivian
Tyndale on “ Order,” &c.
Tyndale's “ Similitude to describe our Holy Father the Pope
Clerkenwell Election of Ministers .
Campbellism and Christianity at Variance.

598
602
603
604
607

83
85

GENERAL INTELLIGENCE.

Mr. Price's Letter to the Bishop of Exeter

26

Letter of an Episcopalian Presbyter

29

Christian Observer, and the Oxford Tracts

36

British Magazine ; Mr. Faber; Virgin Mary ; Tradition

37

Regius Professor of Oxford's Protest

38

Monument to the Martyrs at Oxford

39

Distresses of Dr. Hook

40

Scottish Episcopal Church

41

Persecution of Dissenters in Wales

ib.
The Dissenters' Festival at Sheffield

ib.

Remarks on the General Union for the Promotion of Religious “ Equality" 43

The Bishop of Exeter and the Rector of Feniton

47

Concors Discordia—The Episcopalians and Presbyterians

81

Bishop Tomline's Plan to Suppress the Dissenters

Episcopalian Ordination recommended in the Congregational Magazine

Puseyism

87

The Catholic Magazine-Prospects of Romanism—The Catholic Institute of

Great Britain—Prayer Meetings on the Continent for the Conversion of

England

89

Attempts to assume an Unsectarian Position— Thoughts on Independent

Missions

91

Piety among the Great in Prussia

93

Persecution of Native Romanists in China

95

Mr. Craik and the Bristol Young Men's Society

96

Rhenius and the Tinnevelly Mission

97

A Remonstrance with the Emperor of China on the Worship of Relics

131

Prayers for the Dead

133

The Oxford Memorial to the Memory of the Martyrs-Baptism

137

Sacerdotal Vestments—The British Magazine

142

Letter of George III. to Archbishop Cornwallis. A.D.

1772

144

The General Association for the Promotion of Religious Equality

145

The Papists rejoice in the Oxford Tracts

200

Episcopal Ordination of the Dissenters

203

Conduct of the American Government towards the Cherokee Indians

206

Lord Durham's Report on Canadian Religious Establishments

208

Oxford Tracts-Reserve

244

Short Account of the Conversion of the Hon. and Rev. G. Spencer to the Ro-

man Catholic Faith

252

The Church Magazine

257

Dr. Leifchild's Counsels to a Young Minister

259

Congregational Union

263

State of the American Church.—Finney's Lectures on Revivals

289

Louis Phillippe and the Queen of Tahiti

293

The Second Council of Orange

296

Thoughts on the Sonship of Christ. A Fragment, by Robert Hall, of Arnsby,

with a Short Sketch of the Author's Life

299

The Rev. W. Dodsworth

304

The Symbolieal Pictures in Littlemore Chapel

307

The Testimony of Elias Hicks, of America, against Slavery, and ill-treatmeni

of Free Men of Colour

308

The Yearly Meeting of the society of Friends, and the question of Birthright

Membership

309

[ocr errors]
[ocr errors]

.

.

[ocr errors]

.

[ocr errors]
[ocr errors]
[ocr errors]
[ocr errors]

PAGE.

Duelling. Remonstrance of the Bath Clergy to Lord Powerscourt

310

A Scene from Exeter Hall

312

Canonisation of Saints by the Pope

349

The Naval and Military Bible Society

353

Letter of Mr. Threlkelă the Missionary, to the King of the French, on behalf

of the Queen of Tahiti

355

On the Title “ Reverend".

357

Contention of the Wesleyans and the Established Church in Canada

358

Questions brought under consideration

at a Meeting of Christians, June 3, 1839 360

Journal of the Life and Labours of Thomas Shillitoe, in the service of the

Gospel of Jesus Christ

361

Mr. Gladstone and the “ Christian Observer'i

414

Controversy of the Clergy at Beverly

415

Descent of a Meteoric Stone at Wells.-Remarks on “ The Image which fell

down from Jupiter,” &c.

417

Clerical Advertisements

418

Indian Idolatry

419

Latimer's Answer to Papists

420

Dissenters' Colleges—A Learned Ministry

456

Presbyterian Ordination at Geneva

461

Liberty of Ministry—The Bishop of Chester

463

“ Truth will out”—The

Testimony of Andrew Fuller

464

The Immobility of the Evil that is done under the Sun-Slavery—The Opium

Trade, &c.

464

William Huntington's Views of the Millennium

466

The Golden Age of Puseyism.--Superstitions of the Clergy

518

The Bishop of Exeter

521

General Meeting of the - Société de la Morale Chrétienne"

523

An Elucidation of the Prophecies, by J. Tyso

ib.

Pitt's Death-bed

524

The Priestly Sentiments of Dissenting Ministers

564

Ordination amongst the Wesleyan Methodists

565

Letter addressed to Roman Catholics

566

Puseyistic Tracts (Registration not Baptism)

570

“German Evangelical Mission Station, Suviseshapuram in Tinnevelly

" 571

Letter from a Clergyman of the Church of England

612

Portrait of a Neologian Clergyman, from a German paper, Correspon-

dent" of Hamburgh

613

Memoir of Mr. King, of Doncaster

614

Death of Runjeet Sing-Lavish Gifts to the Brahmins, &c.

617

King of Burmah-Defender of the Faith

618

Hindoo Comparison between Duelling and the Suttee

ib,

Missionary Conference .

619

CORRESPONDENCE.

MISCELLANIES.

100

ib.

ib.

ib.

ib.

ib.

ib.
48

[ocr errors]

ib.

156

212

315

468

ib.

524

572

620

ib.

ib.

THE INQUIRER.

JANUARY, 1839.

What saith the Scripture ?-Rom. iv. 3.

THE CHURCH OF GOD.

Ephes. iii. 10. " To the intent that now unto the principalities and powers in heavenly places might be

known by the church the manifold wisdom of God.” The works of creation are not sufficient of themselves to explain the attributes of God. They argue, indeed, his "eternal power and godhead,” so as to render atheism inexcusable: but the belief in a supereminent and eternal Power, which has by design formed all things, mounts up but one degree towards a knowledge of the divine nature. To abide in the opinion that there has been a First Cause acting with omnipotent wisdom in the production of the universe, is but a melancholy progress in Theology, leaving the mind in a greater degree of perplexity than if it had never assented at all to the creed of Deism. The aspect of the moral world is such as to fill the contemplative deist with despair; for whence, he would enquire, is all this evil? whence this confusion, disorder, and distress? How comes it, that in the mournful succession of centuries, no remedy is discovered for the profound misery which prevails amongst rational creatures, and that time discloses no possible plan for the durable amelioration of the human race? The history of mankind is but an iteration of the same crimes and the same follies, varied a little by the impulses of the passions, as they are directed into new channels by the accidents of evolving events, but always coming round again to join the ancient stream of sorrow and disgrace, which from time immemorial has been rolling on, of the same magnitude, and in the same direction. Can the Creator of the universe have wished that the chief of his creatures should abide in this fallen and deplorable condition, in which he always has been ; and, for aught that can be seen to the contrary, ever must be ? What can be the principles of moral government by which the contriver of such a system is actuated ? Does the Almighty attend at all to moral events? Has he retired from any further consideration of the acts of his rational creatures, and is he contented if only the complicated wheels of the vast material

[blocks in formation]

machine continue in proper action, and proceed according to the original plan, in a fair and harmonious movement? Or is there some other antagonist god ? some power of evil, darkness, and obliquity, a successful adversary to goodness, light, and rectitude ? Is there indeed a dualism in the divine government, and are the Magi and the Manichæans right in their explanations of the misery and iniquity of mankind ?

Inquiries such as these are natural, and indeed almost inevitable, when the prospects of man and the attributes of God are contemplated out of the covenant of grace: for it is in vain, when the designs of the Almighty in his spiritual creation are unheeded, to attempt to explain his goodness, or to describe the nature of his excellency. If man had never been created, and if this earth had been peopled only by the tribes of irrational creatures, which never violate the harmony of the Creator's design, or transgress their prescribed boundaries, the goodness and wisdom of God might have been a subject of unlimited praise and ceaseless admiration : but as man is undeniably the chief and master of all creatures, and as it is with man only that evil is to be found, it follows that there is a striking defect in that which ought to be the most perfect part of the whole plan. And this is continually the difficulty with those who endeavour to solve the problem of the divine government, but who are unacquainted with God as Jehovah, the covenant God of his people. And truly it is no wonder that the difficulty of the problem should, to inquirers so circumstanced, be insuperable; for if, when we behold some fair design marvellously well executed in every part except in that which we should naturally expect to be the most perfect,—if, when we see a statue comely in the limbs, but deformed and graceless in the head, or a palace of majestic proportions and noble architecture spoiled by the principal tower or the centre dome of the building,—we then decide that the statuarist or the architect have eminently failed in their object, and more glaringly than if the whole plan had been ill executed; so do we, when we look on man as the chief of the works of God, but marred and ruined by the evil of his nature,—see in him a blot which has disfigured the whole design of the creation, and deteriorated all its excellency. In vain, therefore, is it for sentimentalists and ethnic moralists, or the followers of Socinus, to enlarge on the goodness of that Deity whom Nature preaches unto them; for though the wonders of the starry vault attest an artificer of skill divine; and though the vicissitudes of the seasons, and the wellcontrived fabric of this earth, read to us lectures of heavenly wisdom; and though the splendour of nature in its vernal wardrobe, and the joy of ten thousand happy animals, might well demand the thanksgiving of

« НазадПродовжити »